I am trying to create a generic method in Go that will fill a struct using data from a map[string]interface{}. For example, the method signature and usage might look like:

func FillStruct(data map[string]interface{}, result interface{}) {
    ...
}

type MyStruct struct {
    Name string
    Age  int64
}

myData := make(map[string]interface{})
myData["Name"] = "Tony"
myData["Age"]  = 23

result := &MyStruct{}
FillStruct(myData, result)

// result now has Name set to "Tony" and Age set to 23

I know this can be done using JSON as an intermediary; is there another more efficient way of doing this?

  • 1
    Using JSON as an intermediary will use reflection anyway.. assuming you're going to be using the stdlib encoding/json package to do that intermediate step.. Can you give an example map and example struct that this method could be used on? – Simon Whitehead Nov 4 '14 at 21:09
  • Yea, that is the reason I am trying to avoid JSON. Seems like there hopefully is a more efficient method that I don't know about. – tgrosinger Nov 4 '14 at 22:01
  • Can you give an example use case? As in - show some pseudocode that demonstrates what this method will do? – Simon Whitehead Nov 4 '14 at 22:02
  • Question has been updated – tgrosinger Nov 4 '14 at 22:05
  • Mmm... there might be a way with the unsafe package .. but I dare not try it. Other than that .. Reflection is required, as you need to be able to query the metadata associated with a type in order to place data into its properties. It would be fairly straight forward to wrap this in json.Marshal + json.Decode calls.. but that's double the reflection. – Simon Whitehead Nov 4 '14 at 22:19
up vote 49 down vote accepted

The simplest way would be to simply use https://github.com/mitchellh/mapstructure

import "github.com/mitchellh/mapstructure"

mapstructure.Decode(myData, &result)

If you want to do it yourself, you could do something like this:

http://play.golang.org/p/tN8mxT_V9h

func SetField(obj interface{}, name string, value interface{}) error {
    structValue := reflect.ValueOf(obj).Elem()
    structFieldValue := structValue.FieldByName(name)

    if !structFieldValue.IsValid() {
        return fmt.Errorf("No such field: %s in obj", name)
    }

    if !structFieldValue.CanSet() {
        return fmt.Errorf("Cannot set %s field value", name)
    }

    structFieldType := structFieldValue.Type()
    val := reflect.ValueOf(value)
    if structFieldType != val.Type() {
        return errors.New("Provided value type didn't match obj field type")
    }

    structFieldValue.Set(val)
    return nil
}

type MyStruct struct {
    Name string
    Age  int64
}

func (s *MyStruct) FillStruct(m map[string]interface{}) error {
    for k, v := range m {
        err := SetField(s, k, v)
        if err != nil {
            return err
        }
    }
    return nil
}

func main() {
    myData := make(map[string]interface{})
    myData["Name"] = "Tony"
    myData["Age"] = int64(23)

    result := &MyStruct{}
    err := result.FillStruct(myData)
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
    }
    fmt.Println(result)
}
  • Very nice +1 :) – Simon Whitehead Nov 4 '14 at 22:58
  • 1
    Thank you. I am using a slightly modified version. play.golang.org/p/_JuMm6HMnU – tgrosinger Nov 4 '14 at 22:58
  • I want the FillStruct behavior on all my various structs and not have to define func (s MyStr...) FillStruct ... for every one. Is it possible to define FillStruct for a base struct then have all my other structs 'inherit' that behavior? In the paradigm above it's not possible since only the base struct ... in this case "MyStruct" will actually have it's fields iterated – Michael Mügge Aug 12 '15 at 23:31
  • I mean you could have it work for any struct with something like this: play.golang.org/p/0weG38IUA9 – dave Aug 12 '15 at 23:39
  • Is it possible to implement tags in Mystruct? – vicTROLLA Mar 18 '16 at 19:48

Hashicorp's https://github.com/mitchellh/mapstructure library does this out of the box:

import "github.com/mitchellh/mapstructure"

mapstructure.Decode(myData, &result)

The second result parameter has to be an address of the struct.

You can do it ... it may get a bit ugly and you'll be faced with some trial and error in terms of mapping types .. but heres the basic gist of it:

func FillStruct(data map[string]interface{}, result interface{}) {
    t := reflect.ValueOf(result).Elem()
    for k, v := range data {
        val := t.FieldByName(k)
        val.Set(reflect.ValueOf(v))
    }
}

Working sample: http://play.golang.org/p/PYHz63sbvL

  • 1
    This appears to panic on zero values: reflect: call of reflect.Value.Set on zero Value – James Taylor Apr 23 '17 at 4:17
  • @JamesTaylor Yes. My answer assumes you know exactly what fields you're mapping. If you're after a similar answer with more error handling (including the error you're experiencing), I would suggest Daves answer instead. – Simon Whitehead Apr 23 '17 at 5:00

I adapt dave's answer, and add a recursive feature. I'm still working on a more user friendly version. For example, a number string in the map should be able to be converted to int in the struct.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "reflect"
)

func SetField(obj interface{}, name string, value interface{}) error {

    structValue := reflect.ValueOf(obj).Elem()
    fieldVal := structValue.FieldByName(name)

    if !fieldVal.IsValid() {
        return fmt.Errorf("No such field: %s in obj", name)
    }

    if !fieldVal.CanSet() {
        return fmt.Errorf("Cannot set %s field value", name)
    }

    val := reflect.ValueOf(value)

    if fieldVal.Type() != val.Type() {

        if m,ok := value.(map[string]interface{}); ok {

            // if field value is struct
            if fieldVal.Kind() == reflect.Struct {
                return FillStruct(m, fieldVal.Addr().Interface())
            }

            // if field value is a pointer to struct
            if fieldVal.Kind()==reflect.Ptr && fieldVal.Type().Elem().Kind() == reflect.Struct {
                if fieldVal.IsNil() {
                    fieldVal.Set(reflect.New(fieldVal.Type().Elem()))
                }
                // fmt.Printf("recursive: %v %v\n", m,fieldVal.Interface())
                return FillStruct(m, fieldVal.Interface())
            }

        }

        return fmt.Errorf("Provided value type didn't match obj field type")
    }

    fieldVal.Set(val)
    return nil

}

func FillStruct(m map[string]interface{}, s interface{}) error {
    for k, v := range m {
        err := SetField(s, k, v)
        if err != nil {
            return err
        }
    }
    return nil
}

type OtherStruct struct {
    Name string
    Age  int64
}


type MyStruct struct {
    Name string
    Age  int64
    OtherStruct *OtherStruct
}



func main() {
    myData := make(map[string]interface{})
    myData["Name"]        = "Tony"
    myData["Age"]         = int64(23)
    OtherStruct := make(map[string]interface{})
    myData["OtherStruct"] = OtherStruct
    OtherStruct["Name"]   = "roxma"
    OtherStruct["Age"]    = int64(23)

    result := &MyStruct{}
    err := FillStruct(myData,result)
    fmt.Println(err)
    fmt.Printf("%v %v\n",result,result.OtherStruct)
}

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