24

So, vtable is a table maintained by the compiler which contains function pointers that point to the virtual functions in that class.

and

Assigning a derived class's object to an ancestor class's object is called up-casting.

Up-casting is handling a derived class instance/object using a base class pointer or reference; the objects are not "assigned to", which implies an overwriting of value ala operator= invocation.
(Thanks to: Tony D)

Now, how it is known at run time "which" class's virtual function is supposed to be called?

Which entry in vtable refers to the function of "particular" derived classes which is supposed to be called at run time?

5
  • I try to explain the mechanisms for virtual dispatch in my answer here. Re Assigning a derived class's object to an ancestor class's object is called up-casting." - no - upcasting is handling a derived class instance/object using a base class pointer or reference; the objects are not "assigned to", which implies an overwriting of value ala operator= invocation. Commented Nov 5, 2014 at 6:44
  • Since my answer clearly isn't good enough, I'd like to understand what part of it ISN'T answering the question - I understand it may not be the greatest illustration, but I'd like to understand where I'm going wrong for future reference. Commented Nov 7, 2014 at 8:27
  • @MatsPetersson I did think that you'd think the way you did. :) Actually I waited for 2 days. Your answer did not receive any votes so I did not know whether it was fully correct or not - I am not an expert in this topic so I wasn't the best judge - that's one reason for the bounty. Commented Nov 7, 2014 at 8:36
  • Well, technically, the answer may be "my magic". The C++ standard does not state how this works, just that it does. If you someone can implement it using Magic(tm), then that's a valid implementation. Unfortunately, most of the time Magic doesn't actually work, so we have to rely on more tedious methods... Commented Nov 7, 2014 at 8:54
  • There is excellent book "Inside C++ Object Model By Stanley-Lippman" on these topics. Commented Nov 7, 2014 at 9:46

9 Answers 9

19

You can imagine (although the C++ specification doesn't say this) that the vtable is an identifier (or some other metadata that can be used to "find more information" about the class itself) and a list of functions.

So, if we have a class like this:

class Base
{
  public:
     virtual void func1();
     virtual void func2(int x);
     virtual std::string func3();
     virtual ~Base();
   ... some other stuff we don't care about ... 
};

The compiler will then produce a VTable something like this:

struct VTable_Base
{
   int identifier;
   void (*func1)(Base* this);
   void (*func2)(Base* this, int x);
   std::string (*func3)(Base* this); 
   ~Base(Base *this);
};

The compiler will then create an internal structure that, something like this (this is not possible to compile as C++, it's just to show what the compiler actually does - and I call it Sbase to differntiate the actual class Base)

struct SBase
{
   VTable_Base* vtable;
   inline void func1(Base* this) { vtable->func1(this); }
   inline void func2(Base* this, int x) { vtable->func2(this, x); }
   inline std::string func3(Base* this) { return vtable->func3(this); }
   inline ~Base(Base* this) { vtable->~Base(this); }
};

It also builds the real vtable:

VTable_Base vtable_base = 
{ 
   1234567, &Base::func1, &Base::func2, &Base::func3, &Base::~Base 
};

And in the constructor for Base, it will set the vtable = vtable_base;.

When we then add a derived class, where we override one function (and by default, the destructor, even if we don't declare one) :

class Derived : public Base
{
    virtual void func2(int x) override; 
};

The compiler will now make this structure:

struct VTable_Derived
{
   int identifier;
   void (*func1)(Base* this);
   void (*func2)(Base* this, int x);
   std::string (*func3)(Base* this); 
   ~Base(Derived *this);
};

and then does the same "structure" building:

struct SDerived
{
   VTable_Derived* vtable;
   inline void func1(Base* this) { vtable->func1(this); }
   inline void func2(Base* this, int x) { vtable->func2(this, x); }
   inline std::string func3(Base* this) { return vtable->func3(this); }
   inline ~Derived(Derived* this) { vtable->~Derived(this); }
};

We need this structure for when we are using Derived directly rather than through the Base class.

(We rely on the compiler chainin the ~Derived to call ~Base too, just like normal destructors that inherit)

And finally, we build an actual vtable:

VTable_Derived vtable_derived = 
{ 
   7654339, &Base::func1, &Derived::func2, &Base::func3, &Derived::~Derived 
};

And again,the Derived constructor will set Dervied::vtable = vtable_derived for all instances.

Edit to answer question in comments: The compiler has to carefully place the various components in both VTable_Derived and SDerived such that it matches VTable_Base and SBase, so that when we have a pointer to Base, the Base::vtable and Base::funcN() are matching Derived::vtable and Derived::FuncN. If that doesn't match up, then the inheritance won't work.

If new virtual functions are added to Derived, they must then be placed after the ones inherited from Base.

End Edit.

So, when we do:

Base* p = new Derived;

p->func2(); 

the code will look up SBase::Func2, which will use the correct Derived::func2 (because the actual vtable inside p->vtable is VTable_Derived (as set by the Derived constructor that is called in conjunction with the new Derived).

5
  • Isn't the identifier in the vtable kind of redundant? I mean you can identify by the value of the vtable pointer, plus it saves a level of indirection.
    – dtech
    Commented Nov 8, 2014 at 11:09
  • Ok, calling it an identifier, it is more like a pointer to "more data about the object". But there is some "not pointer to function" stuff at the beginning of the vtable, typically. At least in the compilers where I have looked at the vtable. Commented Nov 8, 2014 at 12:51
  • That makes sense - if you are going to have extra data in the vtable, you would want to put it in a uniform location. My point was the location of the vtable in memory is "id enough". Haven't looked what is inside of the vtables of production compilers.
    – dtech
    Commented Nov 8, 2014 at 13:38
  • I understood your remaining answer excluding this statement: because the actual vtable inside p->vtable is VTable_Derived). I couldn't get this. Please point out where in your answer it is shown that actual vtable inside p->vtable is VTable_Derived. I have missed some point here. Commented Nov 13, 2014 at 6:05
  • I have added a section to explain that SBase and SDerived must be equivalent (match each othter), otherwise this won't work. Commented Nov 13, 2014 at 8:46
9
+200

I'll take a different route from the other answers and try to fill just the specific gaps in your knowledge, without going very much into the details. I'll address the mechanics just enough to help your understanding.

So, vtable is a table maintained by the compiler which contains function pointers that point to the virtual functions in that class.

The more precise way to say this is as follows:

Every class with virtual methods, including every class that inherits from a class with virtual methods, has its own virtual table. The virtual table of a class points to the virtual methods specific to that class, i.e. either inherited methods, overridden methods or newly added methods. Every instance of such a class contains a pointer to the virtual table that matches the class.

Up-casting is handling a derived class instance/object using a base class pointer or reference; (...)

Perhaps more enlightening:

Up-casting means that a pointer or reference to an instance of class Derived is treated as if it were a pointer or reference to an instance of class Base. The instance itself, however, is still purely an instance of Derived.

(When a pointer is "treated as a pointer to Base", that means that the compiler generates code for dealing with a pointer to Base. In other words, the compiler and the generated code know no better than that they are dealing with a pointer to Base. Hence, a pointer that is "treated as" will have to point to an object that offers at least the same interface as instances of Base. This happens to be the case for Derived because of inheritance. We'll see how this works out below.)

At this point we can answer the first version of your question.

Now, how it is known at run time "which" class's virtual function is supposed to be called?

Suppose we have a pointer to an instance of Derived. First we upcast it, so it is treated as a pointer to an instance of Base. Then we call a virtual method upon our upcasted pointer. Since the compiler knows that the method is virtual, it knows to look for the virtual table pointer in the instance. While we are treating the pointer as if it points to an instance of Base, the actual object has not changed value and the virtual table pointer within it is still pointing to the virtual table of Derived. So at runtime, the address of the method is taken from the virtual table of Derived.

Now, the particular method may be inherited from Base or it might be overridden in Derived. It does not matter; if inherited, the method pointer in the virtual table of Derived simply contains the same address as the corresponding method pointer in the virtual table of Base. In other words, both tables are pointing to the same method implementation for that particular method. If overridden, the method pointer in the virtual table of Derived differs from the corresponding method pointer in the virtual table of Base, so method lookups on instances of Derived will find the overridden method while lookups on instances of Base will find the original version of the method — regardless of whether a pointer to the instance is treated as a pointer to Base or a pointer to Derived.

Finally, it should now be straightforward to explain why the second version of your question is a bit misguided:

Which entry in vtable refers to the function of "particular" derived classes which is supposed to be called at run time?

This question presupposes that vtable lookups are first by method and then by class. It is the other way round: first, the vtable pointer in the instance is used to find the vtable for the right class. Then, the vtable for that class is used to find the right method.

4
  • Could you please expound on this: ` While we are treating the pointer as if it points to an instance of Base` How does it get treated as a base pointer? What does that even mean? I think that would be the key to my understanding of the concept. Commented Nov 13, 2014 at 6:44
  • I have added a clarification between parentheses in my answer. Basically, "treating A as B" means "have the compiler generate code for B even though it might actually be dealing with A".
    – Julian
    Commented Nov 13, 2014 at 7:54
  • Thanks for nice answer. One more clarification is needed: compiler generate code for B I would like to understand - are you talking about the memory allocations which would happen according to B? Is there anything more than memory allocations that happen when compiler generate code for B? And how does the compiler know that it doesn't have to create a new vtable pointer for B? Commented Nov 15, 2014 at 8:01
  • Thanks for the compliment, you're welcome. No, memory allocation does not interact with dynamic binding in any way at all. When talking about code generated by the compiler, I meant the story about using the vtable in order to look up the right method for the instance. The vtable trick is only applied to user-defined virtual methods such as the classic Shape.draw() example. By the time your program dynamic-binds a method, the instance was already allocated with its true type, and by the time it is deallocated, the allocator has its own means to determine what to do.
    – Julian
    Commented Nov 15, 2014 at 13:42
5

Which entry in vtable refers to the function of "particular" derived classes which is supposed to be called at run time?

None, it is not an entry in the vtable, but the vtable pointer that is part of each and every object instance that determines which are the correct set of virtual functions for that particular object. This way, depending on the actual vtable pointed to, invoking the "first virtual method" from the vtable may result in the calling of different functions for objects of different types in the same polymorphic hierarchy.

Implementations may vary, but what I personally consider the most logical and performing thing to do is to have the vtable pointer being the first element in the class layout. This way you can dereference the very address of the object to determine its type based on the value of the pointer sitting in that address, since all objects of a given type will have that pointer pointing to the same vtable, which is created uniquely for every object that has virtual methods, which is required to enable features as overriding certain virtual methods.

How do upcasting and vtables work together to ensure correct dynamic binding?

Upcasting itself isn't strictly needed, neither is downcasting. Remember that you already have the object allocated in memory, and it will already have its vtable pointer set to the correct vtable for that type which is what ensures it, up an down casting doesn't change the vtable for that object, it only changes the pointer you operate through.

Downcasting is needed when you want to access functionality that is not available in the base class and is declared in the derived class. But before you try to do that, you must be sure that particular object is of or inherits the type which declares that functionality, which is where dynamic_cast comes in, when you dynamic cast the compiler generates a check for that vtable entry and whether it inherits the requested type from another table, generated at compile time, and if so the dynamic cast succeeds, otherwise it fails.

The pointer you access the object through doesn't refer to the right set of virtual functions to call, it merely serves as a gauge to which functions in the vtable you can refer to as the developer. That is why it is safe to upcast using a C style or static cast, which performs no runtime checks, because then you only limit your gauge to the functions available in the base class, which are already available in the derived class, so there is no room for error and harm. And that's why you must always use a dynamic cast or some other custom technique still based on virtual dispatch when you downcast, because you have to be sure that object's associated vtable does indeed contain the extra functionality you may invoke.

Otherwise you will get undefined behavior, and of the "bad kind" at that, meaning something fatal will most likely happen, since interpreting arbitrary data as an address of a function of particular signature to be called is a very big no-no.

Also note that in a static context, i.e. when it is known at compile time what the type is, the compiler will most likely not use the vtable to call virtual functions but use direct static calls or even inline certain functions, which will make them that much faster. In such cases upcasting and using a base class pointer instead of the actual object will only diminish that optimization.

4

Polymorphism and Dynamic Dispatch (hyper-abridged version)

Note: I was not able to fit enough information about multiple inheritance with virtual bases, as there is not much of anything simple about it, and the details would clutter the exposition (further). This answer demonstrates the mechanisms used to implement dynamic dispatch assuming only single inheritance.

Interpreting abstract types and their behaviors visible across module boundaries requires a common Application Binary Interface (ABI). The C++ standard, of course, does not require the implementation of any particular ABI.

An ABI would describe:

  • The layout of virtual method dispatch tables (vtables)
  • The metadata required for runtime type checks and cast operations
  • Name decoration (a.k.a. mangling), calling conventions, and many other things.

Both modules in the following example, external.so and main.o, are assumed to have been linked to the same runtime. Static and dynamic binding give preference to symbols located within the calling module.


An external library

external.h (distributed to users):

class Base
{
    __vfptr_t __vfptr; // For exposition

public:

    __attribute__((dllimport)) virtual int Helpful();
    __attribute__((dllimport)) virtual ~Base();
};

class Derived : public Base
{
public:

    __attribute__((dllimport)) virtual int Helpful() override;

    ~Derived()
    {
        // Visible destructor logic here.


        // Note: This is in the header!


        // __vft@Base gets treated like any other imported symbol:
        // The address is resolved at load time.
        //
        this->__vfptr = &__vft@Base;
        static_cast<Base *>(this)->~Base();
    }
};

__attribute__((dllimport)) Derived *ReticulateSplines();

external.cpp:

#include "external.h" // the version in which the attributes are dllexport

__attribute__((dllexport)) int Base::Helpful()
{
    return 47;
}
__attribute__((dllexport)) Base::~Base()
{
}

__attribute__((dllexport)) int Derived::Helpful()
{
    return 4449;
}

__attribute__((dllexport)) Derived *ReticulateSplines()
{
    return new Derived(); // __vfptr = &__vft@Derived in external.so
}

external.so (not a real binary layout):

__vft@Base:
[offset to __type_info@Base] <-- in external.so
[offset to Base::~Base] <------- in external.so
[offset to Base::Helpful] <----- in external.so

__vft@Derived:
[offset to __type_info@Derived] <-- in external.so
[offset to Derived::~Derived] <---- in external.so
[offset to Derived::Helpful] <----- in external.so

Etc...

__type_info@Base:
[null base offset field]
[offset to mangled name]

__type_info@Derived:
[offset to __type_info@Base]
[offset to mangled name]

Etc...

An application using the external library

special.hpp:

#include <iostream>
#include "external.h"

class Special : public Base
{
public:

    int Helpful() override
    {
        return 55;
    }

    virtual void NotHelpful()
    {
        throw std::exception{"derp"};
    }
};

class MoreDerived : public Derived
{
public:

    int Helpful() override
    {
        return 21;
    }

    ~MoreDerived()
    {
        // Visible destructor logic here

        this->__vfptr = &__vft@Derived; // <- the version in main.o
        static_cast<Derived *>(this)->~Derived();
    }
};

class Related : public Base
{
public:

    virtual void AlsoHelpful() = 0;
};

class RelatedImpl : public Related
{
public:

    void AlsoHelpful() override
    {
        using namespace std;

        cout << "The time for action... Is now!" << endl;
    }
};

main.cpp:

#include "special.hpp"

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    Base *ptr = new Base(); // ptr->__vfptr = &__vft@Base (in external.so)

    auto r = ptr->Helpful(); // calls "Base::Helpful" in external.so
    // r = 47

    delete ptr; // calls "Base::~Base" in external.so



    ptr = new Derived(); // ptr->__vfptr = &__vft@Derived (in main.o)

    r = ptr->Helpful(); // calls "Derived::Helpful" in external.so
    // r = 4449

    delete ptr; // calls "Derived::~Derived" in main.o



    ptr = ReticulateSplines(); // ptr->__vfptr = &__vft@Derived (in external.so)

    r = ptr->Helpful(); // calls "Derived::Helpful" in external.so
    // r = 4449

    delete ptr; // calls "Derived::~Derived" in external.so



    ptr = new Special(); // ptr->__vfptr = &__vft@Special (in main.o)

    r = ptr->Helpful(); // calls "Special::Helpful" in main.o
    // r = 55

    delete ptr; // calls "Base::~Base" in external.so



    ptr = new MoreDerived(); // ptr->__vfptr = & __vft@MoreDerived (in main.o)

    r = ptr->Helpful(); // calls "MoreDerived::Helpful" in main.o
    // r = 21

    delete ptr; // calls "MoreDerived::~MoreDerived" in main.o


    return 0;
}

main.o:

__vft@Derived:
[offset to __type_info@Derivd] <-- in main.o
[offset to Derived::~Derived] <--- in main.o
[offset to Derived::Helpful] <---- stub that jumps to import table

__vft@Special:
[offset to __type_info@Special] <-- in main.o
[offset to Base::~Base] <---------- stub that jumps to import table
[offset to Special::Helpful] <----- in main.o
[offset to Special::NotHelpful] <-- in main.o

__vft@MoreDerived:
[offset to __type_info@MoreDerived] <---- in main.o
[offset to MoreDerived::~MoreDerived] <-- in main.o
[offset to MoreDerived::Helpful] <------- in main.o

__vft@Related:
[offset to __type_info@Related] <------ in main.o
[offset to Base::~Base] <-------------- stub that jumps to import table
[offset to Base::Helpful] <------------ stub that jumps to import table
[offset to Related::AlsoHelpful] <----- stub that throws PV exception

__vft@RelatedImpl:
[offset to __type_info@RelatedImpl] <--- in main.o
[offset to Base::~Base] <--------------- stub that jumps to import table
[offset to Base::Helpful] <------------- stub that jumps to import table
[offset to RelatedImpl::AlsoHelpful] <-- in main.o

Etc...

__type_info@Base:
[null base offset field]
[offset to mangled name]

__type_info@Derived:
[offset to __type_info@Base]
[offset to mangled name]

__type_info@Special:
[offset to __type_info@Base]
[offset to mangled name]

__type_info@MoreDerived:
[offset to __type_info@Derived]
[offset to mangled name]

__type_info@Related:
[offset to __type_info@Base]
[offset to mangled name]

__type_info@RelatedImpl:
[offset to __type_info@Related]
[offset to mangled name]

Etc...

Invocation is (or might not be) Magic!

Depending on the method and what can be proven at the binding side, a virtual method call may be bound statically or dynamically.

A dynamic virtual method call will read the target function's address from the vtable pointed to by a __vfptr member.

The ABI describes how functions are ordered in vtables. For example: They might be ordered by class, then lexicographically by mangled name (which includes information about const-ness, parameters, etc...). For single inheritance, this approach guarantees that a function's virtual dispatch index will always be the same, regardless of how many distinct implementations there are.

In the examples given here, destructors are placed at the beginning of each vtable, if applicable. If the destructor is trivial and non-virtual (not defined or does nothing), the compiler may elide it entirely, and not allocate a vtable entry for it.

Base *ptr = new Special{};
MoreDerived *md_ptr = new MoreDerived{};

// The cast below is checked statically, which would
// be a problem if "ptr" weren't pointing to a Special.
//
Special *sptr = static_cast<Special *>(ptr);

// In this case, it is possible to
// prove that "ptr" could point only to
// a Special, binding statically.
//
ptr->Helpful();

// Due to the cast above, a compiler might not
// care to prove that the pointed-to type
// cannot be anything but a Special.
//
// The call below might proceed as follows:
//
// reg = sptr->__vptr[__index_of@Base::Helpful] = &Special::Helpful in main.o
//
// push sptr
// call reg
// pop
//
// This will indirectly call Special::Helpful.
//
sptr->Helpful();

// No cast required: LSP is satisfied.
ptr = md_ptr;

// Once again:
//
// reg = ptr->__vfptr[__index_of@Base::Helpful] = &MoreDerived::Helpful in main.o
//
// push ptr
// call reg
// pop
//
// This will indirectly call MoreDerived::Helpful
//
ptr->Helpful();

The logic above is the same for any invocation site that requires dynamic binding. In the example above, it doesn't matter exactly what type ptr or sptr point to; the code will just load a pointer at a known offset, then blindly call it.


Type casting: Ups and Downs

All information about a type hierarchy must be available to the compiler when translating a cast or function call expression. Symbolically, casting is just a matter of traversing a directed graph.

Up-casting in this simple ABI can be performed entirely at compile time. The compiler needs only to examine the type hierarchy to determine if the source and target types are related (there is a path from the source to the target in the type graph). By the substitution principle, a pointer to a MoreDerived also points to a Base and can be interpreted as such. The __vfptr member is at the same offset for all types in this hierarchy, so RTTI logic doesn't need to handle any special cases (in certain implementations of VMI, it would need to grab another offset from a type thunk to grab another vptr and so on...).

Down-casting, however, is different. Since casting from a base type to a derived type involves determining if the pointed-to object has a compatible binary layout, it is necessary to perform an explicit type check (conceptually, this is "proving" that the extra information exists beyond the end of the structure assumed at compile time).

Note that there are multiple vtable instances for the Derived type: One in external.so and one in main.o. This is because a virtual method defined for Derived (its destructor) appears in every translation unit that includes external.h.

Even though the logic is identical in both cases, both images in this example need to have their own copy. This is why type checking cannot be performed using addresses alone.

A down-cast is then performed by walking a type graph (copied in both images) starting from the source type decoded at runtime, comparing mangled names until the compile-time target is matched.

For example:

Base *ptr = new MoreDerived();

// ptr->__vfptr = &__vft::MoreDerived in main.o
//
// This provides the code below with a starting point
// for dynamic cast graph traversals.

// All searches start with the type graph in the current image,
// then all other linked images, and so on...

// This example is not exhaustive!

// Starts by grabbing &__type_info@MoreDerived
// using the offset within __vft@MoreDerived resolved
// at load time.
//
// This is similar to a virtual method call: Just grab
// a pointer from a known offset within the table.
//
// Search path:
// __type_info@MoreDerived (match!)
//
auto *md_ptr = dynamic_cast<MoreDerived *>(ptr);

// Search path:
// __type_info@MoreDerived ->
// __type_info@Derived (match!)
//
auto *d_ptr = dynamic_cast<Derived *>(ptr);

// Search path:
// __type_info@MoreDerived ->
// __type_info@Derived ->
// __type_info@Base (no match)
//
// Did not find a path connecting RelatedImpl to MoreDerived.
//
// rptr will be nullptr
//
auto *rptr = dynamic_cast<RelatedImpl *>(ptr);

At no point in the code above did ptr->__vfptr need to change. The static nature of type deduction in C++ requires the implementation to satisfy the substitution principle at compile time, meaning that the actual type of an object cannot change at runtime.


Summary

I've understood this question as one about the mechanisms behind dynamic dispatch.

To me, "Which entry in vtable refers to the function of "particular" derived classes which is supposed to be called at run time?", is asking how a vtable works.

This answer is intended to demonstrate that type casting affects only the view of an object's data, and that the implementation of dynamic dispatch in these examples operate independently of it. However, type casting does affect dynamic dispatch in the case of multiple inheritance, where determining which vtable to use may require multiple steps (an instance of a type with multiple bases may have multiple vptrs).

4

casting casting is a concept associated with variable. So any variable can be casted. It can be casted up or down.

char charVariable = 'A';
int intVariable = charVariable; // upcasting

int intVariable = 20;
char charVariale = intVariable; // downcasting 

for system defined data type Up cast or downcast is based on your current variable and it mainly related to how much memory compiler is allocating to both compared variable.

If you are assigning a variable which is allocating less memory than the type what is converting to, is called up cast.

If you are assigning a variable which is allocating more memory than the type what is converting to, is called down cast. Down cast create some problem when the value is trying to cast can't fit in to that allocated memory area.

Upcasting in Class level Just like system defined data type we can have object of base class and derived class. So if we want to convert derived type to base type , it is known as down upcasting. That can be achieved by pointer of a base class pointing to a derived class type.

class Base{
    public:
        void display(){
          cout<<"Inside Base::display()"<<endl;
    }
};
class Derived:public Base{
    public:
      void display(){
           cout<<"Inside Derived::display()"<<endl;
    }
};

int main(){
   Base *baseTypePointer = new Derived(); // Upcasting
   baseTypePointer.display();  // because we have upcasted we want the out put as Derived::display() as output

}

output

Inside Base::display()

Excepted

Inside Derived::display()

In the above scenario the output wasn't as excepted. Its because we don't have the v-table and vptr (virtual pointer) in the object the base pointer will call the Base::display() though we have assigned derived type to the base pointer.

To avoid this problem c++ gives us virtual concept. Now the base class display function need to be changed to a virtual type.

virtual void display()

full code is:

class Base{
    public:
        virtual void display(){
          cout<<"Inside Base::display()"<<endl;
    }
};
class Derived:public Base{
    public:
      void display(){
           cout<<"Inside Derived::display()"<<endl;
    }
};

int main(){
   Base *baseTypePointer = new Derived(); // Upcasting
   baseTypePointer.display();  // because we have upcasted we want the out put as Derived::display() as output

}

output

Inside Derived::display()

Excepted

Inside Derived::display()

To understand this we need to understand v-table and vptr; when ever compiler find a virtual along with a function it will generate a virtual table for each of the classes (both Base and all the derived classes).

If virtual function is present than every object will be containing vptr (virtual pointer) pointing to the respective class vtable and vtable will contain the pointer to the respective class virtual function. when you will call the function throught vptr the virutal function will get called and it will invoke the respective class function and we will achieve the required output.

enter image description here

1
  • You have "output" and "Expected" results, in the non-virtual case you don't address why they don't match. Commented Nov 12, 2014 at 13:49
2

I believe, this is best explained by implementing polymorphism in C. Given these two C++ classes:

class Foo {
    virtual void foo(int);
};

class Bar : public Foo {
    virtual void foo(int);
    virtual void bar(double);
};

the C structure definitions (i. e. the header file) would look like this:

//For class Foo
typedef struct Foo_vtable {
    void (*foo)(int);
} Foo_vtable;

typedef struct Foo {
    Foo_vtable* vtable;
} Foo;

//For class Bar
typedef struct Bar_vtable {
    Foo_vtable super;
    void (*bar)(double);
}

typedef struct Bar {
    Foo super;
} Bar;

As you see, there are two structure definitions for each class, one for the vtable and one for the class itself. Note also that both structures for class Bar include a base class object as their first member which allows us upcasting: both (Foo*)myBarPointer and (Foo_vtable*)myBar_vtablePointer are valid. As such, given a Foo*, it is safe to find the location of the foo() member by doing

Foo* basePointer = ...;
(basePointer->vtable->foo)(7);

Now, lets take a look at how we can actually fill the vtables. For that we write some constructors that use some statically defined vtable instances, this is what the foo.c file could look like

#include "..."

static void foo(int) {
    printf("Foo::foo() called\n");
}

Foo_vtable vtable = {
    .foo = &foo,
};

void Foo_construct(Foo* me) {
    me->vtable = vtable;
}

This makes sure that it is possible to execute (basePointer->vtable->foo)(7) on every object that has been passed to Foo_construct(). Now, the code for Bar is quite similar:

#include "..."

static void foo(int) {
    printf("Bar::foo() called\n");
}

static void bar(double) {
    printf("Bar::bar() called\n");
}

Bar_vtable vtable = {
    .super = {
        .foo = &foo
    },
    .bar = &bar
};

void Bar_construct(Bar* me) {
    Foo_construct(&me->super);    //construct the base class.
    (me->vtable->foo)(7);    //This will print Foo::foo()
    me->vtable = vtable;
    (me->vtable->foo)(7);    //This will print Bar::foo()
}

I have used static declarations for the member functions to avoid having to invent a new name for each implementation, static void foo(int) restricts the visibility of the function to the source file. However, it can still be called from other files by the use of a function pointer.

Usage of these classes could look like this:

#include "..."

int main() {
    //First construct two objects.
    Foo myFoo;
    Foo_construct(&myFoo);

    Bar myBar;
    Bar_construct(&myBar);

    //Now make some pointers.
    Foo* pointer1 = &myFoo, pointer2 = (Foo*)&myBar;
    Bar* pointer3 = &myBar;

    //And the calls:
    (pointer1->vtable->foo)(7);    //prints Foo::foo()
    (pointer2->vtable->foo)(7);    //prints Bar::foo()
    (pointer3->vtable->foo)(7);    //prints Bar::foo()
    (pointer3->vtable->bar)(7.0);  //prints Bar::bar()
}

Once you know how this works, you know how C++ vtables work. The only difference is that in C++ the compiler does the work that I did myself in the code above.

2

Let me try to explain it with some examples:-

class Base  
 {  
 public:  
    virtual void function1() {cout<<"Base :: function1()\n";};  
    virtual void function2() {cout<<"Base :: function2()\n";};  
    virtual ~Base(){};
};  

class D1: public Base  
{  
public:  
   ~D1(){};
   virtual void function1() { cout<<"D1 :: function1()\n";};
};  

class D2: public Base  
{  
public:  
   ~D2(){};
   virtual void function2() { cout<< "D2 :: function2\n";};  
}; 

So, compiler would generate three vtables one for each class as these classes have virtual functions. ( Although it's compiler-dependant ).

NOTE:- vtables contain only pointers to virtual functions. Non-virtual functions would still be resolved at compile time...

You are right in saying that vtables are nothing just pointers to functions. vtables for these classes would be like something:-

vtable for Base:-

&Base::function1 ();
&Base::function2 ();
&Base::~Base ();

vtable for D1:-

&D1::function1 ();
&Base::function2 ();
&D1::~D1();

vtable for D2:-

&Base::function1 ();
&D2::function2 ();
&D2::~D2 ();

vptr is a pointer which is used for look-up purpose on this table. Each object of polymorphic class has extra allocated space for vptr in it ( Although where vptr would be in object is entirely implementation dependant ).Generally vptr is at the beginning of object.

With taking all into account , if I make a call to func, compiler at run time would check what b is actually pointing to:-

void func ( Base* b )
{
  b->function1 ();
  b->function2 ();
}

Let's say we have object of D1 passed to func. Compiler would resolve calls in following manner:-

First it would fetch vptr from object and then it will use it to get correct address of function to call. SO, in this case vptr would give access to D1's vtable. and when it looksup for function1 it would get the address of function1 defined in base class. In case of call to function2, it would get address of base's function2.

Hope I have clarified your doubts to your satisfaction...

2

The implementation is compiler specific. Here I am going to do some thoughts that have NOTHING TO DO WITH ANY ACTUAL KNOWLEDGE of how exactly it is done in compilers, but just with some minimal requirements that are needed in order to work as required. Keep in mind that each instance of a class with virtual methods knows at run time which is the class it belongs too.

Lets suppose we have a chain of base and derived classes with a length of 10 ( so a derived class has a gran gran ... gran father ). We may call these classes base0 base1 ... base9 where base9 derives from base8 etc.

Each of these classes define a method as: virtual void doit(){ ... }

Let's suppose that in the base class we use that method inside a method called "dowith_doit" non overridden in any derived class. The semantics of c++ imply that depending on the base class of the instance we have at hand, we must apply to that instance the "doit" defined in the base class of the instance at hand.

Essentially we have two possible ways of doing it: a) Assign to any such virtual method a number that must be different for each method defined in the chain of derived classes. In that case the number could be also a hash of the name of the method. Each class defines a table with 2 columns were the first column holds the number of the method and the second column the address of the function. In that case each class will have a vtable with so many rows as the number of virtual methods defined inside the class. The execution of the method happens by searching inside the class the method under consideration. That search may be done linearly ( slow ) of by bisections ( when there is an order based on the number of the method).

b) Assign to any such method a progressively increasing integer number (for each different method in the chain of classes), and for each class define a table with only one column. For virtual methods defined inside the class the function address will be in the raw defined by the number of the method. There will be many rows with null pointers because each class doesn't override always the methods of previous classes. The implementation may choose in order to improve efficiency to fill null rows with the address hold in the ancestor class of the class under consideration.

Essentially no other simple ways exist in order work with virtual methods efficiently.

I suppose that only the second solution (b) is used in actual implementations, because the trade of between space overhead used for non existing methods compared to execution efficiency of case (b) is favorable for case b (taking into consideration too that methods are limited in number - may be 10 20 50 but not 5000 ).

2

Upon instantiation every class with at least one virtual function gets a hidden member usually called vTable (or virtual dispatch table, VDT).

class Base {
hidden: // not part of the language, just to illustrate.
  static VDT baseVDT; // per class VDT for base
  VDT *vTable; // per object instance
private:
  ...
public:
  virtual int base1();
  virtual int base2();
  ...
};

The vTable contains pointers to all functions in Base.

As a hidden part of Base's constructor vTable gets assigned to baseVDT.

VDT Base::baseVDT[] = { 
  Base::base1, 
  Base::base2 
};

class Derived : public Base {
hidden:
  static VDT derivedVDT; // per class VDT for derived
private:
  ...
public:
  virtual int base2();
  ...
};

The vTable for Derived contains pointers to all functions defined in Base followed by functions defined in Derived . When objects of type Derived gets constructed, vTable gets set to derivedVDT.

VDT derived::derivedVDT[] = { 
  // functions first defined in Base
  Base::base1, 
  Derived::base2, // override
  // functions first defined in Derived are appended
  Derived::derived3 
}; // function 2 has an override in derived.

Now if we have

Base *bd    = new Derived;
Derived *dd = new Derived;
Base *bb    = new Base;

bd points to an object of type derived who's vTable points to Derived

So the function calls

x = bd->base2();
y = bb->base2();

actually is

// "base2" here is the index into vTable for base2.
x = bd->vTable["base2"]();  // vTable points to derivedVDT
y = bb->vTable["base2"]();  // vTable points to baseVDT

The index is the same in both due to the construction of the VDT. This also means the compiler knows the index at the moment of compilation.

This could also be implemented as

// call absolute address to virtual dispatch function which calls the right base2.
x = Base::base2Dispatch(bd->vTable["base2"]); 

inline Base::base2Dispatch(void *call) {
  return call(); // call through function pointer.
}

Which with O2 or O3 will be the same.


There are some special cases:

dd points to a derived or more derived object and base2 is declared final then

z = dd->base2();

actually is

z = Derived::base2();  // absolute call to final method.

If dd pointed to a Base object or anything else your in undefined behaviour land and the compiler can still do this.

The other case is if the compiler sees there are only a few derived classes from Base it could generate a Oracle interface for base2. [free after a MS or Intel compiler guy at some C++ conference in 2012 or 2013? showing that (~500%?) more code gives (2+ times?) speedup on average]

inline Base::base2Dispatch(void *call) {
  if (call == Derived::base2)  // most likely from compilers static analysis or profiling.
    return Derived::base2(); // call absolute address
  if (call == Base::base2)
    return Base::base2(); // call absolute address

  //  Backup catch all solution in case of more derived classes
  return call(); // call through function pointer.
}

Why on earth do you want to do this as a compiler??? more code is bad, unneeded branches diminish performance!

Because calling a function pointer is very slow on many architectures, optimistic example

Get the address from memory, 3+ cycles. Delayed pipeline while waiting for ip value, 10 cycles, on some processors 19+ cycles.

If the most complex modern cpu's can predict the actual jump address [BTB] as well as it does branch prediction, this might be a loss. Else the ~8 extra instructions will easily save the 4*(3+10) instructions lost due to pipeline stalls (if the prediction failure rate is less than 10-20%).

If the branches in the two if's both predict taken (ie evaluate to false) the ~2 cycles lost is nicely covered by the memory latency to get the call address and we are no worse off.
If one of the if's are mispredicts the the BTB will most likely also be wrong. Then the cost of the mispredicts is around 8 cycles of which 3 are paid by the memory latency, and the correct not take or the 2nd if might save the day or we pay the full 10+ pipeline stall.
If only the 2 possibilities exists one of them will be taken and we save the pipeline stall from the function pointer call and we will max. get one mispredict resulting in no (significant) worse performance than calling directly. If the memory delay is longer and the result is correctly predicted the effect is much larger.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.