24

I've always considered C++ to be one of the most strongly typed languages out there.
So I was quite shocked to see Table 3 of this paper state that C++ is weakly typed.

Apparently,

C and C++ are considered weakly typed since, due to type-casting, one can interpret a field of a structure that was an integer as a pointer.

Is the existence of type casting all that matters? Does the explicit-ness of such casts not matter?

More generally, is it really generally accepted that C++ is weakly typed? Why?

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  • 5
    C++ isn't weakly typed, but you can subvert the type system if you want to. So one could argue that it isn't fully strongly typed. Nov 5, 2014 at 9:28
  • .. and if it allows you (type punning is tricky) Nov 5, 2014 at 9:29
  • 4
    @Mehrdad I think "weakly typed" is a quite subjective term. "Strictly typed" and "statically typed" vs. "loosely typed" and "dynamically typed" are more objective, more precise words. From what I can tell, generally people use "weakly typed" as a diminutive-pejorative term which means "I don't like the notion of types in this language". It's sort of an argumentum ad hominem (or rather, argumentum ad linguam) for those who can't bring up professional-technical arguments against a particular language. Nov 5, 2014 at 9:32
  • 1
    @Mehrdad It also has slightly different interpretations; the generally accepted meaning is "the compiler generates errors if types don't match up". Another interpretation is that "there are no or few implicit conversions". Based on this, C++ can actually be considered a strictly typed language, and most often it is considered as such. Nov 5, 2014 at 9:36
  • 4
    Bjarne Stroustrup's book mentions that C++ is a strongly typed language on page 2. Who would know better than him :-)
    – Damon
    Nov 5, 2014 at 11:04

5 Answers 5

38

That paper first claims:

In contrast, a language is weakly-typed if type-confusion can occur silently (undetected), and eventually cause errors that are difficult to localize.

And then claims:

Also, C and C++ are considered weakly typed since, due to type-casting, one can interpret a field of a structure that was an integer as a pointer.

This seems like a contradiction to me. In C and C++, the type-confusion that can occur as a result of casts will not occur silently -- there's a cast! This does not demonstrate that either of those languages is weakly-typed, at least not by the definition in that paper.

That said, by the definition in the paper, C and C++ may still be considered weakly-typed. There are, as noted in the comments on the question already, cases where the language supports implicit type conversions. Many types can be implicitly converted to bool, a literal zero of type int can be silently converted to any pointer type, there are conversions between integers of varying sizes, etc, so this seems like a good reason to consider C and C++ weakly-typed for the purposes of the paper.

For C (but not C++), there are also more dangerous implicit conversions that are worth mentioning:

int main() {
  int i = 0;
  void *v = &i;
  char *c = v;
  return *c;
}

For the purposes of the paper, that must definitely be considered weakly-typed. The reinterpretation of bits happens silently, and can be made far worse by modifying it to use completely unrelated types, which has silent undefined behaviour that typically has the same effect as reinterpreting bits, but blows up in mysterious yet sometimes amusing ways when optimisations are enabled.

In general, though, I think there isn't a fixed definition of "strongly-typed" and "weakly-typed". There are various grades, a language that is strongly-typed compared to assembly may be weakly-typed compared to Pascal. To determine whether C or C++ is weakly-typed, you first have to ask what you want weakly-typed to mean.

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  • 1
    +1 great point. But to answer the question you should also mention whether or not C++ is strongly typed by whatever the accepted definition is!
    – user541686
    Nov 5, 2014 at 9:35
  • 2
    @Mehrdad Agreed, and expanded my answer.
    – user743382
    Nov 5, 2014 at 9:40
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    @AndreyChernyakhovskiy No, they cannot. "Cast" means "explicit conversion" (or specifically, the syntax used to write an explicit conversion). There are implicit conversions, like I already noted in my answer, but they aren't called casts.
    – user743382
    Nov 5, 2014 at 9:55
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    @AndreyChernyakhovskiy: Unsafe conversions don't occur implicitly in C++, but they do in C (e.g. pointer conversions).
    – user541686
    Nov 5, 2014 at 9:55
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    @Mehrdad Ah, yes, I think you may have a good point there. I should add that to my answer.
    – user743382
    Nov 5, 2014 at 9:57
12

"weakly typed" is a quite subjective term. I prefer the terms "strictly typed" and "statically typed" vs. "loosely typed" and "dynamically typed", because they are more objective and more precise words.

From what I can tell, people generally use "weakly typed" as a diminutive-pejorative term which means "I don't like the notion of types in this language". It's sort of an argumentum ad hominem (or rather, argumentum ad linguam) for those who can't bring up professional or technical arguments against a particular language.

The term "strictly typed" also has slightly different interpretations; the generally accepted meaning, in my experience, is "the compiler generates errors if types don't match up". Another interpretation is that "there are no or few implicit conversions". Based on this, C++ can actually be considered a strictly typed language, and most often it is considered as such. I would say that the general consensus on C++ is that it is a strictly typed language.

Of course we could try a more nuanced approach to the question and say that parts of the language are strictly typed (this is the majority of the cases), other parts are loosely typed (a few implicit conversions, e. g. arithmetic conversions and the four types of explicit conversion).

Furthermore, there are some programmers, especially beginners who are not familiar with more than a few languages, who don't intend to or can't make the distinction between "strict" and "static", "loose" and "dynamic", and conflate the two - otherwise orthogonal - concepts based on their limited experience (usually the correlation of dynamism and loose typing in popular scripting languages, for example).

In reality, parts of C++ (virtual calls) impose the requirement that the type system be partially dynamic, but other things in the standard require that it be strict. Again, this is not a problem, since these are orthogonal concepts.

To sum up: probably no language fits completely, perfectly into one category or another, but we can say which particular property of a given language dominates. In C++, strictness definitely does dominate.

0
3

In contrast, a language is weakly-typed if type-confusion can occur silently (undetected), and eventually cause errors that are difficult to localize.

Well, that can happen in C++, for example:

#define _USE_MATH_DEFINES
#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>
#include <limits>

void f(char n) { std::cout << "f(char)\n"; }
void f(int n) { std::cout << "f(int)\n"; }
void g(int n) { std::cout << "f(int)\n"; }

int main()
{
    float fl = M_PI;   // silent conversion to float may lose precision

    f(8 + '0'); // potentially unintended treatment as int

    unsigned n = std::numeric_limits<unsigned>::max();
    g(n);  // potentially unintended treatment as int
}

Also, C and C++ are considered weakly typed since, due to type-casting, one can interpret a field of a structure that was an integer as a pointer.

Ummmm... not via any implicit conversion, so that's a silly argument. C++ allows explicit casting between types, but that's hardly "weak" - it doesn't happen accidentally/silently as required by the site's own definition above.

Is the existence of type casting all that matters? Does the explicit-ness of such casts not matter?

Explicitness is a crucial consideration IMHO. Letting a programmer override the compiler's knowledge of types is one of the "power" features of C++, not some weakness. It's not prone to accidental use.

More generally, is it really generally accepted that C++ is weakly typed? Why?

No - I don't think it is accepted. C++ is reasonably strongly typed, and the ways in which it has been lenient that have historically caused trouble have been pruned back, such as implicit casts from void* to other pointer types, and finer grained control with explicit casting operators and constructors.

3

Well, since the creator of C++, Bjarne Stroustrup, says in The C++ Programming Language (4th edition) that the language is strongly typed, I would take his word for it:

C++ programming is based on strong static type checking, and most techniques aim at achieving a high level of abstraction and a direct representation of the programmer’s ideas. This can usually be done without compromising run-time and space efficiency compared to lower-level techniques. To gain the benefits of C++, programmers coming to it from a different language must learn and internalize idiomatic C++ programming style and technique. The same applies to programmers used to earlier and less expressive versions of C++.

In this video lecture from 1994 he also states that the weak type system of C really bothered him, and that's why he made C++ strongly typed: The Design of C++ , lecture by Bjarne Stroustrup

-2

Let me give you a simple example:

 if ( a + b )

C/C+= allows an implicit conversion from float to int to Boolean.

A strongly-typed language would not allow such an implicit conversion.

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