5

I have a few logical processes implemented in the same class. A class instance get a generator for each process, and run() advances said generators. In my case generators don't end.

How would you call foo_function and foo_object in the code below

class C(threading.Thread):
    def foo_function(self):
        """ generator *function*,
            logical process foo """
        while True:
            # some state checks
            if self.some_attr:
                # side-effects here
                pass
            yield

    def __init__(self):
        # generator *object*
        # i.e. process instance
        self.foo_object = self.foo_function()  # <- here

    def run(self):
        while True:
            next(self.foo_object)
            next(self.another_object)
            if xxx:
                next(self.yet_another_object)

Typical processes are discovery, authentication, watchdog, etc.

How can I name function that defines the generator and the attribute that contains generator object in a sensible way?

Finally just for the kicks, same name name would be insane, right?

class C:
    def foo(self):
        yield 1; yield 2
    def __init__(self):
        self.foo = self.foo()

c = C()            
type(C.foo) is function
type(c.foo) is generator
  • 1
    Lads, how about you leave a comment what you consider opinion-based? After all it deals with martinfowler.com/bliki/TwoHardThings.html :) – Dima Tisnek Nov 10 '14 at 12:46
  • 1
    As written, yes this is very confusing. :) Do you have some concrete specifics that might help to clarify this very abstract example? Details: foo() is run purely for side-effect? self.maybe_foo = foo_if_some_attr() – spazm Nov 18 '14 at 8:01
  • 1
    you really lost me on this line: self.name_me_process_generator = self.name_me_process_function() – spazm Nov 18 '14 at 8:02
  • Good point, I'll attempt to re-edit. – Dima Tisnek Nov 18 '14 at 8:09
4

You could make the members containing generators be created automatically from the function's name, using some kind of covention designed by your self. For instance, in my convention all generators will be contained by a member called: <function_name>_gen.

I would call the function name as its responsability: discovery, authentication and watchdog are good names. So you only need a way to automatically set: self.discovery_gen, self.authentication_gen and self.watchdog_gen.

Code sample:

class C:

    def discovery(self):
        yield 1; yield 2

    # Register all the functions for wich you want to have a generator
    # object.
    REGISTERED_GEN_FUNCTIONS = [discovery]

    def __init__(self):

        for func in self.REGISTERED_GEN_FUNCTIONS:
            name = func.__name__
            # All generators objects will be called <function_name>_gen.
            setattr(self, "{0}_gen".format(name), getattr(self, name)())

a = C()
for i in a.discovery_gen:
    print(i)

Ouput

>>> 1
>>> 2 
  • Cool idea to instantiate all generators in one go. – Dima Tisnek Nov 20 '14 at 8:19
  • This was a close call. !Raydel actually provided a naming convention, and @parchment pointed to using anonymous objects to avoid naming convention at all. I didn't like this naming convention, and avoidance is an answer to a different question. Thus, the prize is shared, accepted answer to one respondent and bounty to the other. – Dima Tisnek Nov 24 '14 at 7:47
3
+100

If the generators are only accessed inside the run method you can do something like this:

class C:
    def a_process(self):
        while True: yield

    def another_process(self):
        while True: yield

    def run(self):
        # Use itertools.izip in python 2
        for _ in zip(a_process(), another_process()):
            pass

Here, zip and the for loop will create and advance the generators automatically. This way, you don't need to keep track of them.

If you need access to the generators outside the run method, you can create an ordered dictionary of generators (in case the generators need to be advanced in a defined order):

from collections import OrderedDict

class C:
    # Processes here

    def __init__(self):
        self.generators = OrderedDict()
        for gn in ('a_process', 'another_process'):
            self.generators[gn] = getattr(self, gn)()

    def run(self):
        while True:
            for g in self.generators.values():
                next(g)
  • Interesting take on the problem. A funny side-note is that I was able to refactor my code to use iterools.izip; This is in a way similar to scoping (keep function ref's in a class and instance ref's as local variables). However I am still interested in the answer to the original problem. How to name things to keep generator function and instance unambiguous. – Dima Tisnek Nov 18 '14 at 20:17
  • This was a close call. @Raydel actually provided a naming convention, and !parchment pointed to using anonymous objects to avoid naming convention at all. I didn't like this naming convention, and avoidance is an answer to a different question. Thus, the prize is shared, accepted answer to one respondent and bounty to the other. – Dima Tisnek Nov 24 '14 at 7:48
0

Addressing only the headline "python generator function naming convention".

Personally, I like to name generator functions like "yield_items". The code reads naturally and the keyword yield indicates that it outputs a generator object.

def yield_squares(iter_max=10):
    for i in range(iter_max):
        yield i**2

squares = yield_squares()
for square in squares:
    print(square)
  • Interesting idea! Explicit yield_smth feels a bit Python2 though, doesn't it? I mean Python3 returns iterators for map, filter, reversed, thus perhaps it's just standard now? – Dima Tisnek May 21 '19 at 1:57

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