7

In C++, I declare a custom class to store some values for an object. Then, I declare a vector of said object. Finally, I iterate through the vector to assign values to the fields.

#include <vector>

using namespace std;

class Custom
{ 
    public:
        int metric,nX,nY;
    private:

};

int main( int argc, char** argv )
{

vector<Custom> MyWonderfulVector;

// Some code//

for(int i=0 ; i<10 ; i++){

MyWonderfulVector[i].metric = computation1();
MyWonderfulVector[i].nX= computation2();
MyWonderfulVector[i].nY= computation3();
}

return 0;

}

It throws a vector subscript out of range when it tries to evaluate MyWonderfulVector[i].metric = computation1();. metric is an int and computation1() too. at the first iteration, i=0 so it should be ok. Curiously, somewhere else in the code, I have a vector of another class (included in a library) and this syntax works for it, so I don't understand why it doesn't work here.

EDIT :

Ok with the comments I changed to following line: vector MyWonderfulVector(10);

So my problem is that I did not initialize the size of the vector (bad habit from Matlab ;) ) From what I understand, if I don't initialize the vector's to a fixed size, I must push_back the objects to "increase" the size of the vector. So, I should create a temporary Custom Object to assign the fields, then push_back this temp object into the vector. If one of the commenter wants to put this into an answer...

8
  • Does your MyWonderfulVector has objects ? You need to allocate objects to the vector by a push_back operation. Did you do that in the code you didn't show ?
    – Mahesh
    Nov 5, 2014 at 15:56
  • 3
    I suspect some_variable > MyWonderfulVector.size(). Your problem is likely somewhere in // Some code//. Nov 5, 2014 at 15:58
  • No, it is empty. What I want to do is like: "vector<int> MyIntVector"
    – Doombot
    Nov 5, 2014 at 15:59
  • 2
    Then give it a size, like vector<Custom> MyWonderfulVector(some_variable);. Even with the int case, it's undefined behavior. Nov 5, 2014 at 16:00
  • 1
    @Doombot You can use resize to set the size of the vector.
    – sjdowling
    Nov 5, 2014 at 16:05

5 Answers 5

9

You declare a vector of Customs in the line

   vector<Custom> MyWonderfulVector;

but it is an empty vector. There are no items in it. When you try to access the elements of the vector in the for loop, you are accessing the vector using out of bounds indices.

I can think of the following options for fixing that problem.

  1. Create the vector with an initial size.

     vector<Custom> MyWonderfulVector(10);
    
  2. Add to the vector in the for loop.

    for(int i=0 ; i<10 ; i++){
      Custom c;
      c.metric = computation1();
      c.nX= computation2();
      c.nY= computation3();
      MyWonderfulVector.push_back(c);
    

    }

8

You defined a vector with no elements

vector<Custom> MyWonderfulVector;

If you call its member function empty like

std::cout << std::boolalpha << MyWonderfulVector.empty() << std::endl;

then you will get true

So you may not use the subscript operator applied to an ampty vector except with index 0 but in any case you may not assign a value.

You could either define the vector initially with some_variable elements like

vector<Custom> MyWonderfulVector( some_variable );

and then you could use your loop. Or you could reserve space for some_variable elements in the vector and in this case use member function push_back instead of the subscript operator. For example

vector<Custom> MyWonderfulVector;
MyWonderfulVector.reserve( some_variable );


for ( int i=0 ; i<some_variable ; i++ )
{
    Custom obj;
    obj.metric = computation1();
    obj.nX= computation2();
    obj.nY= computation3();

    MyWonderfulVector.push_back( obj );
}
5
  • Hahaha this exactly what I was about to do. Thanks!
    – Doombot
    Nov 5, 2014 at 16:11
  • So the reserve is preallocating memory. Ok I'll add that!
    – Doombot
    Nov 5, 2014 at 16:14
  • @Doombot You are right. reserve preallocates memory for future elements that can be added by means of push_back Nov 5, 2014 at 16:15
  • @@Doombot Take into account that you may use push_back without reserving memory. But in this case the memory will be reallocated each time when a new element is addeed. So it is more efficient to reserve memory that there will not be a reallocation. Nov 5, 2014 at 16:20
  • "But in this case the memory will be reallocated each time when a new element is addeed" Huh? Since when? Nov 5, 2014 at 17:56
2

I got the same problem before. I tried using the push_back function from vector class and it worked. Maybe it will solve your problem

1

Vectors are not like arrays. You need to use push_back

5
  • He's not adding items to the vector, he's getting a reference to the object at i and assigning a value to one of it's members.
    – Stormenet
    Nov 5, 2014 at 15:59
  • @Stormenet Except what if there isn't an object at i? Then you get a vector subscript out of range exception.
    – sjdowling
    Nov 5, 2014 at 16:04
  • @sjdowling You won't get any such exception unless you use .at(i) instead of [i]. If you use the operator[] method to get or set elements out of range, it's simply undefined behavior.
    – cdhowie
    Nov 5, 2014 at 16:05
  • @cdhowie According to the standard and in release mode. However most implementations do bounds checking on operator [] in Debug which is what Doombot is seeing.
    – sjdowling
    Nov 5, 2014 at 16:07
  • True, I am in debug mode of MSVS C++.
    – Doombot
    Nov 5, 2014 at 16:12
0

Try using resize() before accesing an element. So your code will become:

for(int i=0 ; i<10 ; i++){

MyWonderfulVector.resize(i);

MyWonderfulVector[i].metric = computation1();
MyWonderfulVector[i].nX= computation2();
MyWonderfulVector[i].nY= computation3();
}

If you further want to add some other elements, you can store the size of the vector in size_t variable, and increment it every time you want to add other element.

size_t my_vector_size = MyWonderfulVector.size();
for(int i=0 ; i<10 ; i++)
{
    my_vector_size++;
    MyWonderfulVector.resize(my_vector_size);
}

This is a way to do it.

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