113

Is it possible to inspect the return value of a function in gdb assuming the return value is not assigned to a variable?

3 Answers 3

131

I imagine there are better ways to do it, but the finish command executes until the current stack frame is popped off and prints the return value -- given the program

int fun() {
    return 42;
}

int main( int argc, char *v[] ) {
    fun();
    return 0;
}

You can debug it as such --

(gdb) r
Starting program: /usr/home/hark/a.out 

Breakpoint 1, fun () at test.c:2
2               return 42;
(gdb) finish
Run till exit from #0  fun () at test.c:2
main () at test.c:7
7               return 0;
Value returned is $1 = 42
(gdb) 

The finish command can be abbreviated as fin. Do NOT use the f, which is abbreviation of frame command!

3
  • 4
    Great answer dude. I was using "return" which actually forcefully returns from the frame (with no return value obviously), and couldn't work out what was wrong :P Jul 30, 2010 at 17:21
  • 1
    May b a stupid question What if function does not have return value?
    – Roon13
    Oct 15, 2018 at 23:29
  • @hark how to do this when gdb can t step inside the function like when the debugging symbols for a specific library aren t availaible? Dec 23, 2020 at 22:00
48

Yes, just examine the EAX register by typing print $eax. For most functions, the return value is stored in that register, even if it's not used.

The exceptions to this are functions returning types larger than 32 bits, specifically 64-bit integers (long long), doubles, and structs or classes.

The other exception is if you're not running on an Intel architecture. In that case, you'll have to figure out which register is used, if any.

3
  • 9
    Not using an intel machine, running on sparc. g0 is where the return value is stored but I'd like something independent of architecture..
    – fuad
    Nov 6, 2008 at 5:08
  • 1
    Thanks for the clarification; I'd assumed you were using x86. But unless you're going to be scripting GDB across multiple architectures, I don't see a good reason not to use "print $g0", which doesn't have any side effects (unlike the other answers). Nov 6, 2008 at 5:11
  • Sure. Sorry though, it's o0 and not g0. Register g0 is always 0.
    – fuad
    Nov 6, 2008 at 6:03
8

Here's how todo this with no symbols.

gdb ls
This GDB was configured as "ppc64-yellowdog-linux-gnu"...
(no debugging symbols found)
Using host libthread_db library "/lib64/libthread_db.so.1".

(gdb) break __libc_start_main
Breakpoint 1 at 0x10013cb0
(gdb) r
Starting program: /bin/ls
(no debugging symbols found)
(no debugging symbols found)
(no debugging symbols found)
(no debugging symbols found)
(no debugging symbols found)
(no debugging symbols found)
Breakpoint 1 at 0xfdfed3c
(no debugging symbols found)
[Thread debugging using libthread_db enabled]
[New Thread 4160418656 (LWP 10650)]
(no debugging symbols found)
(no debugging symbols found)
[Switching to Thread 4160418656 (LWP 10650)]

Breakpoint 1, 0x0fdfed3c in __libc_start_main () from /lib/libc.so.6
(gdb) info frame
Stack level 0, frame at 0xffd719a0:
 pc = 0xfdfed3c in __libc_start_main; saved pc 0x0
 called by frame at 0x0
 Arglist at 0xffd71970, args:
 Locals at 0xffd71970, Previous frame's sp is 0xffd719a0
 Saved registers:
  r24 at 0xffd71980, r25 at 0xffd71984, r26 at 0xffd71988, r27 at 0xffd7198c,
  r28 at 0xffd71990, r29 at 0xffd71994, r30 at 0xffd71998, r31 at 0xffd7199c,
  pc at 0xffd719a4, lr at 0xffd719a4
(gdb) frame 0
#0  0x0fdfed3c in __libc_start_main () from /lib/libc.so.6
(gdb) info fr
Stack level 0, frame at 0xffd719a0:
 pc = 0xfdfed3c in __libc_start_main; saved pc 0x0
 called by frame at 0x0
 Arglist at 0xffd71970, args:
 Locals at 0xffd71970, Previous frame's sp is 0xffd719a0
 Saved registers:
  r24 at 0xffd71980, r25 at 0xffd71984, r26 at 0xffd71988, r27 at 0xffd7198c,
  r28 at 0xffd71990, r29 at 0xffd71994, r30 at 0xffd71998, r31 at 0xffd7199c,
  pc at 0xffd719a4, lr at 0xffd719a4

Formatting kinda messed up there, note the use of "info frame" to inspect frames, and "frame #" to navigate your context to another context (up and down the stack)

bt also show's an abbreviated stack to help out.

0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.