3

I have a report that needs downloaded on a daily basis. I'd like to download this file once per per day, and have that file end in report_[date][time].html

example code

wget -k -p -O C:\Users\[user]\Desktop\New\report_%date%%time%.html www.report.com

I have tried multiple combinations such as

report_date +%Y-%m-%d-%H%M%S

and

report_yyyymmdd_hhnnss

without any luck.

Is it possible to give wget a date/timestamp within an output file?

2
  • 1
    This is a Windows question (judging from your backslash usage). It's got nothing to do with wget. How would you create any file in windows with the date and time as part of the filename? (BTW if you want to know how to do this in Unix, that I do know...) Nov 5, 2014 at 22:27
  • Windows CMD options are whats needed. Thanks for the tip.
    – schwiap28
    Nov 5, 2014 at 23:19

2 Answers 2

1
wget --output-document=`date +"%Y-%m-%d"`.file 
www.report.com/reports/report.file

The command “wget” will download the file “report.file” from exemplary destination “www.report.com/reports/“ an save it with the (output) document name that is The current date in the format YYYY-MM-DD with the arbitrary extension “.file”. The date command fetches the full time stamp of the operation. %Y, %m and %d take the year, month and day parts of that, respectively. The apostrophes and quotation marks are required to format the output as string. An examplary output for today would be “2020-08-15.file”.

5
  • 2
    Could you please provide an explanation to your code?
    – Skully
    Aug 14, 2020 at 0:23
  • The command “wget” will download the file “report.file” from exemplary destination “www.report.com/reports/“ an save it with the (output) document name that is The current date in the format YYYY-MM-DD with the arbitrary extension “.file”. The date command fetches the full time stamp of the operation. %Y, %m and %d take the year, month and day parts of that, respectively. The apostrophes and quotation marks are required to format the output as string. An examplary output for today would be “2020-08-15.file”.
    – tipavi
    Aug 15, 2020 at 15:06
  • I really wonder how the question for an explanation of the code by @Skully gets an upvote, but neither the explanation nor the code do. Stackoverflow sometimes is a bit odd.
    – tipavi
    May 8, 2021 at 10:14
  • Good answers include explanation and details, not just 2 lines of code. You should edit your explanation into the answer.
    – endolith
    Dec 13, 2021 at 21:20
  • I don't quite see the need for it, but here you go.
    – tipavi
    Dec 15, 2021 at 16:23
0

This will get you YYYY-MM-DD.png

wget --output-document=%DATE:~-4%-%DATE:~4,2%-%DATE:~7,2%.png www.webpage.com
1
  • 1
    Defining the output-documents name is the right idea. However, the date format seems a bit odd to me.
    – tipavi
    Aug 13, 2020 at 22:14

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.