23

I am trying to create this design in CSS. Is it possible?

the  design is it:

This is my code:

.triangle{
    border-radius: 50%;
    width: 120px;
    height: 120px;
}
.triangle img {
    width: 120px;
    height: 120px;
}
.triangle::after{
    right: 150px;
    top: 50%;
    border: solid transparent;
    content:"";
    height:  0px;
    width:  0px;
    position: absolute;
    pointer-events: none;
    border-color: white;
    border-left-color: white;/*white is the color of the body*/
    border-width: 60px;
    margin-top: -60px
}
<div class="triangle">
    <img src="http://deskode.com/images/placeholder/team/07.jpg">
</div>

The triangle is formed, but not in the same way as the image.

jsFiddle

16

With a single class.

http://jsfiddle.net/koh36dsz/1/

.wedge {
  width: 0px;
  height: 0px;
  border-right: 60px solid transparent;
  border-top: 60px solid red;
  border-left: 0px solid red;
  border-bottom: 60px solid red;

}

<div class='wedge'></div>
  • :o thank you very much at the end I'll stay with this simple code: D – grijalvaromero Nov 6 '14 at 19:21
23

This can be achieved using just CSS. Pseudo elements :before and :after are used to make the triangles (positioned relatively to the container), while border-radius creates the rounded corners.

.triangle {
    border-radius: 0 60px 60px 0;
    height: 120px;
    overflow: hidden;    
    position: relative;
    width: 120px;
}
.triangle:before, .triangle:after {
    content: "";
    height: 0;
    left: 0;
    position: absolute;
    width: 0;
}
.triangle:before {
    border-right: 60px solid transparent;
    border-top: 60px solid #FFFFFF;
    top: 0;
}
.triangle:after {
    border-bottom: 60px solid #FFFFFF;
    border-right: 60px solid transparent;
    bottom: 0;
}
<div class="triangle">
    <img alt="" src="http://placehold.it/120x120" />
</div>

JS Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/rw7q2te2/1/

  • I applaud your ingenuity, however the use of border for the triangle shape means that when placed on a different colour background the colour won't show through. – Chris Spittles Nov 6 '14 at 9:36
  • 2
    @ChrisSpittles That is true, the border-color of the triangle needs to be set to the same background-color of the element containing .triangle for this to work. I don't think this is an issue in this case (unless the grijalvaromero would like to correct me!) as the OP does not specifically state that this needs to work for different background colours and border-left-color: white;/*white is the color of the body*/ in the code suggests that this will be used on a white background. – Hidden Hobbes Nov 6 '14 at 9:45
  • Could border-color: inherit maybe be used as a hackish workaround to the different-background-colors-problem? You'd have to set the border-color of the container to the same as the background though, I suppose. – Svish Nov 6 '14 at 11:20
  • @Svish That would work, although as you note you'll still be declaring the border colour just in a different place. – Hidden Hobbes Nov 6 '14 at 19:46
15

While Hidden Hobbes already provided a good answer, there's another way by rotating the div and the image. However, this requires a rather larger image which will be clipped. Basic code is

    .triangle{
        border-radius: 50%;
        width: 120px;
        height: 120px;
        margin:0 auto;
        transform: rotate(-45deg);
        position: relative;
        overflow:hidden;
        border-radius: 0 50% 50% 50%;
    }
    .triangle img{
        width: 200%;
        height: 200%;   
        transform: rotate(45deg);
        position: relative;
        left: -60px;
        top: -30px;
    }

DEMO

  • It's @HiddenHobbes as in Calvin and Hobbes not Galadriel and Hobbits ^^ – FelipeAls Nov 6 '14 at 9:43
  • +1 This method has the advantage that it can be used on parent elements with different background colours/images. Oh, and I'm definitely not a Hobbit! :P – Hidden Hobbes Nov 6 '14 at 9:53
  • Again, I am truly sorry, I love Calvin&Hobbes, shouldn't have slipped my attention. – Paul Nov 6 '14 at 9:54
  • @Paul, it's no problem, don't sweat it! :) – Hidden Hobbes Nov 6 '14 at 19:33
10

Here is a version based on @HiddenHobbes answer and @misterManSam's comment where the container is completely transparent.

http://jsfiddle.net/jkz8bkb8/1/

body {
    background: #f00;
}
.triangle {
    overflow: hidden;
    position: relative;
    width: 90px;
    height: 90px;
    margin: 15px;
    transform: rotate(45deg);
}
.triangle img {
    border-radius: 50%;
    position: absolute;
    right: 0;
    top: 0;
    width: 120px;
    height: 120px;
    transform: rotate(-45deg);
}
<div class="triangle">
    <img alt="" src="http://placehold.it/120x120" />
</div>

5

As Austin Brunkhorst pointed out in the comments, it's possible using SVG clipping. I've put together a quick Fiddle showing how it can be done and I'll add the HTML below:

<svg width="120px" height="100px" version="1.1" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg">
    <defs>
        <clipPath id="mask">
            <path d="M230 80 A 45 45, 0, 1, 0, 275 125 L 275 80 Z" fill="red"  transform="rotate(-135 133 120)" />
        </clipPath>
    </defs>
    <image xlink:href="http://placehold.it/120x100" x="0" y="0" height="100px" width="120px"  clip-path="url(#mask)" />
</svg>

It's worth pointing out that I'm no expert and I'll bet that transform attribute can be removed from the path element if you can work out how to correctly tweak the d value.

  • This is actuality the simplest answer XD. Should have used some more markup to format the text and answer. +1 – Persijn Jun 4 '15 at 21:01

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