43

I need to normalize a list of values to fit in a probability distribution, i.e. between 0.0 and 1.0.

I understand how to normalize, but was curious if Python had a function to automate this.

I'd like to go from:

raw = [0.07, 0.14, 0.07]  

to

normed = [0.25, 0.50, 0.25]

10 Answers 10

80

Use :

norm = [float(i)/sum(raw) for i in raw]

to normalize against the sum to ensure that the sum is always 1.0 (or as close to as possible).

use

norm = [float(i)/max(raw) for i in raw]

to normalize against the maximum

  • 23
    Nice. It's maybe worth noting that computing the sum in advance, rather than for each element in the comprehension, would be more efficient. So: s = sum(raw); norm = [float(i)/s for i in raw] – ohruunuruus May 5 '15 at 23:43
  • Is that the same as (np.array(x) / np.array(x).sum()) / np.array(x).max() ? – alvas Feb 21 '18 at 2:40
  • 1
    @alvas sorry - I can't be sure about numpy - but assuming dividing an array by a single value divides each value in the array; then it looks right. – Tony Suffolk 66 Feb 21 '18 at 14:18
7

if your list has negative numbers, this is how you would normalize it

a = range(-30,31,5)
norm = [(float(i)-min(a))/(max(a)-min(a)) for i in a]
6

try:

normed = [i/sum(raw) for i in raw]

normed
[0.25, 0.5, 0.25]
6

How long is the list you're going to normalize?

def psum(it):
    "This function makes explicit how many calls to sum() are done."
    print "Another call!"
    return sum(it)

raw = [0.07,0.14,0.07]
print "How many calls to sum()?"
print [ r/psum(raw) for r in raw]

print "\nAnd now?"
s = psum(raw)
print [ r/s for r in raw]

# if one doesn't want auxiliary variables, it can be done inside
# a list comprehension, but in my opinion it's quite Baroque    
print "\nAnd now?"
print [ r/s  for s in [psum(raw)] for r in raw]

Output

# How many calls to sum()?
# Another call!
# Another call!
# Another call!
# [0.25, 0.5, 0.25]
# 
# And now?
# Another call!
# [0.25, 0.5, 0.25]
# 
# And now?
# Another call!
# [0.25, 0.5, 0.25]
4

There isn't any function in the standard library (to my knowledge) that will do it, but there are absolutely modules out there which have such functions. However, its easy enough that you can just write your own function:

def normalize(lst):
    s = sum(lst)
    return map(lambda x: float(x)/s, lst)

Sample output:

>>> normed = normalize(raw)
>>> normed
[0.25, 0.5, 0.25]
  • This is one of the two answers that extract sum() from the loop... I still prefer mine but I think this is a + exactly for the auxiliary variable s = sum(lst). – gboffi Nov 6 '14 at 17:37
  • 4
    normalize([1,0,-1]) will raise ZeroDivisionError :) – Yan Foto Nov 14 '15 at 14:06
4

If you consider using numpy, you can get a faster solution.

import random, time
import numpy as np

a = random.sample(range(1, 20000), 10000)
since = time.time(); b = [i/sum(a) for i in a]; print(time.time()-since)
# 0.7956490516662598

since = time.time(); c=np.array(a);d=c/sum(a); print(time.time()-since)
# 0.001413106918334961
  • Ru sure this equation is right? I am getting vals in d < 0. Not sure if this should happen. Maybe I did something wrong. I am inputting vals from ~ -0.5 to 05.? – ScipioAfricanus Sep 2 '19 at 21:43
  • @ScipioAfricanus random.sample only works on integer. If float is required, check `np.random.uniform' or something similar instead. – Tengerye Sep 3 '19 at 1:59
1

Try this :

from __future__ import division

raw = [0.07, 0.14, 0.07]  

def norm(input_list):
    norm_list = list()

    if isinstance(input_list, list):
        sum_list = sum(input_list)

        for value in input_list:
            tmp = value  /sum_list
            norm_list.append(tmp) 

    return norm_list

print norm(raw)

This will do what you asked. But I will suggest to try Min-Max normalization.

min-max normalization :

def min_max_norm(dataset):
    if isinstance(dataset, list):
        norm_list = list()
        min_value = min(dataset)
        max_value = max(dataset)

        for value in dataset:
            tmp = (value - min_value) / (max_value - min_value)
            norm_list.append(tmp)

    return norm_list
1

If working with data, many times pandas is the simple key

This particular code will put the raw into one column, then normalize by column per row. (But we can put it into a row and do it by row per column, too! Just have to change the axis values where 0 is for row and 1 is for column.)

import pandas as pd


raw = [0.07, 0.14, 0.07]  

raw_df = pd.DataFrame(raw)
normed_df = raw_df.div(raw_df.sum(axis=0), axis=1)
normed_df

where normed_df will display like:

    0
0   0.25
1   0.50
2   0.25

and then can keep playing with the data, too!

1

For ones who wanna use scikit-learn, you can use

from sklearn.preprocessing import normalize

x = [1,2,3,4]
normalize([x]) # array([[0.18257419, 0.36514837, 0.54772256, 0.73029674]])
normalize([x], norm="l1") # array([[0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4]])
normalize([x], norm="max") # array([[0.25, 0.5 , 0.75, 1.]])
0

Use scikit-learn:

from sklearn.preprocessing import MinMaxScaler
data = np.array([1,2,3]).reshape(-1, 1)
scaler = MinMaxScaler()
scaler.fit(data)
print(scaler.transform(data))

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.