15

I feel like I'm overlooking something totally obvious here but what is the correct way (if any) to use point-free notation for composing a binary function and a unary function? For example, the following code compiles:

sortedAppend :: (Ord a) -> [a] -> [a] -> [a]
sortedAppend xs ys = sort $ xs ++ ys

but the following code does not compile:

sortedAppend :: (Ord a) -> [a] -> [a] -> [a]
sortedAppend = sort . (++)

Are we able to compose (++) with sort (in the order shown above)? If so, how?

18

I don't think that any of these solutions (mine or the others) is that pretty, but I prefer....

let sortedAppend = (sort .) . (++)

The reason I prefer this is because it is easy for me to think of.... If you ignore the parenthesis, you basically need to add an extra (.) for each parameter

f . g --one parameter
f . . g --two params
f . . . g --three params

which makes sense, since g x returns a function with N-1 inputs....

....but those needed parens make it so ugly....

((f .) .) . g
  • 2
    The SEC perspective: result = (.), then result f g, (result.result) f g, (result.result.result) f g – luqui Nov 6 '14 at 22:18
12

You could use the "owl-operator" (sometimes called breast.operator too I think):

Prelude> :t (.).(.)
(.).(.) :: (b -> c) -> (a -> a1 -> b) -> a -> a1 -> c

BUT: I don't think you should - what you wrote is very readable - using this:

sortedAppend = ((.).(.)) sort (++)

is not IMO

PS: yeah you could do

(.:.) = (.).(.)
sortedAppend = sort .:. (++)

but still .... not digestible

PPS: I just found out that this operator is defined as (.:) in a package called pointless-fun ^^

  • 5
    One other possibility: sortedAppend xs = sort . (xs ++) – Michael Snoyman Nov 6 '14 at 18:44
  • 3
    A more generalized form of (.).(.) is fmap fmap fmap. Keep in mind that this can be turned into fmap `fmap` fmap, which is equivalent to fmap . fmap, but I like the first version best. This will let you do something like (+1) .: [Just 1, Nothing, Just 2] and get [Just 2, Nothing, Just 3], or something like sequence $ length .: replicate 3 getLine (might be better as fmap length $ replicateM 3 getLine), but there are other uses for the operator. Essentially all it does is map a function 2 Functor layers deep. – bheklilr Nov 6 '14 at 19:48
  • 1
    @bheklilr I love this - but to reproduce it I would have to remember the tripple-flip or reinvent it - due to some strange reason I can remember the (.).(.) without any problem ;) – Carsten Nov 6 '14 at 19:58
11

Just for the sake of completeness let's actually take your example and gradually make it point free.

First, remember (f . g) x = f (g x). Then there is Eta-reduction (\x -> f x) ≡ f. Last useful thing is operator section. Using these rules we can go like this:

sortedAppend xs ys = sort $ xs ++ ys        -- original function
sortedAppend xs ys = sort (xs ++ ys)        -- remove $
sortedAppend xs ys = sort ((++) xs ys)      -- prefix application of ++
sortedAppend xs ys = (sort . ((++) xs)) ys  -- definition of composition
sortedAppend xs = sort . (++) xs            -- eta reduction
sortedAppend xs = (sort .) ((++) xs)        -- operator section
sortedAppend xs = ((sort .) . (++)) xs      -- definition of composition
sortedAppend = (sort .) . (++)              -- eta reduction
8

I don’t think I’d personally recommend adding dependencies for things like that, but there is also

(.:) :: (c -> d) -> (a -> b -> c) -> a -> b -> d

in Data.Composition in the package composition.

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