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I create a list<string> machineTypes and fill it with data. I want to check to see if the collection contains any combination of strings. My initial plan was to use a for loop, but obviously I can't check multiple indexes in the middle of a for loop.

for (int i = 0; i < machineTypes.Count; i++)
            {
                if (machineTypes[i] == "W")
                //do stuff
                if ((machineTypes[i] == "P") && (machineTypes[i] == "W") && (machineTypes[i] == "A") && (machineTypes[i] == "C"))
                    //do stuff
            }

So I'm looking for suggestions as to the best way to do this. I suppose I could use String.Join, but I was wondering if there was a more elegant way.

marked as duplicate by Alexei Levenkov c# Nov 6 '14 at 20:50

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  • 5
    How machineTypes[i] can be P, W, A and C at the same time...? – Konrad Kokosa Nov 6 '14 at 20:34
  • 3
    Can you give more of an overview of what data is in each item inside of machineTypes, and a better explanation of what condition you are trying to check for? – lukevp Nov 6 '14 at 20:35
  • Please define "combination of strings". What input do you anticipate? What condition are you actually looking for? – Peter Duniho Nov 6 '14 at 20:36
  • 1
    Do you actually mean machineTypes.Contains("P") && machineTypes.Contains("W") && ... ? – pescolino Nov 6 '14 at 20:37
  • 1
    Give a sample: input, expected output. This will be a good start. – Patrice Gahide Nov 6 '14 at 20:38
0

Perhaps not too elegant - but something like this might help

for (int i = 0; i < machineTypes.Count; i++)
            {
                int jj=i;
                if (machineTypes[i] == "W")
                //do stuff
                if (jj< machineTypes.Count-4)
                if ((machineTypes[jj] == "P") && (machineTypes[jj+1] == "W") && (machineTypes[jj+2] == "A") && (machineTypes[jj+3] == "C"))
                    //do stuff
            }

I just made a new var jj in case you want to increment or alter its value, without altering the i value. Note the if (jj< machineTypes.Count-4) condition checking to see that you can safely use jj+3 as an index.

  • That is far more complicated than it needs to be – Jonesopolis Nov 6 '14 at 20:41
  • Yes I know, but that was for ease of understanding, and more complex enhancement. The question was not too clear, so I allowed for the use of jj++, etc – Grantly Nov 6 '14 at 20:42
  • Ah, unfortunately I would have no idea how many values or at what index the value would be stored. It's an interesting technique though. I'll give you a +1 for the effort. – user1729696 Nov 6 '14 at 20:43
  • I have no idea how this code is related to the question (which I don't understand either). You sure need a twisted brain to crack that. – Patrice Gahide Nov 6 '14 at 20:46
  • Without knowing how many values, it gets very difficult. Unless you know how many values - at some stage (perhaps when you have found them all) - then you can still check your index using something like if ( (index<count) ? list[index]=='W' : false) to check your index before each comparison. In that case you should only have one comparison in each if statement, and cascade or repeat them – Grantly Nov 6 '14 at 20:47

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