7

In my shell, I need check if a string is a valid IPv6 address.

I find two ways, neither of them is ideal enough to me.

One is http://twobit.us/2011/07/validating-ip-addresses/, while I wonder if it must be such complex for such a common requirement.

The other is expand ipv6 address in shell script, this is simple, but for major distribution of Linux, sipcalc isn't a common default utility.

So my question, is there a simple way or utility to validate a IPv6 address with shell?

Thanks in advance.

6
  • 2
    Unless some external binary utility are installed, I believe the shell script solution by itself (Your referred solution 1) is already too simple.
    – Robin Hsu
    Commented Nov 7, 2014 at 8:21
  • A binary utility is good only if it's common in normal Linux distributions. Commented Nov 7, 2014 at 8:32
  • IS this just to check it is valid or convert it to a valid address ?
    – user3442743
    Commented Nov 7, 2014 at 8:44
  • @Jidder Yes, just for address format. Commented Nov 7, 2014 at 8:56
  • There are some pretty complex combinations for IPv6 addresses that you may or may not want to accept as valid. There are uncompressed, compressed, and mixed versions of each; throw in global unicast, multicast, link-local, unique-local, IPv4 mapped, etc. You need to decide what is acceptable to you (do you accept or reject reserved, unused addresses that meet the format?). There are complete libraries of regular expressions for IPv6 which is probably your best option.
    – Ron Maupin
    Commented Nov 11, 2014 at 1:13

4 Answers 4

4

Most distros come with package iproute2 (name may vary) preinstalled. So you can rely on the command ip for querying the routing table:

ip -6 route get <probe_addr>/128 >/dev/null 2>&1 

Even on a machine without appropriate route this delivers rc=0 when the probe is in valid v6-syntax.

Also refer to grand central's answer, rc==1 means an invalid IPv6 address.

4

The code in the first link isn't particularly elegant, but modulo stylistic fixes, I don't think you can simplify much beyond that (and as indicated in a comment, it may already be too simple). The spec is complex and mandates a number of optional features, which is nice for the end user, but cumbersome for the implementor.

You could probably find a library for a common scripting language which properly encapsulates this logic in a library. My thoughts would go to Python, where indeed Python 3.3 includes a standard module called ipaddress; for older versions, try something like

#!/usr/bin/env python
import socket
import sys
try:
    socket.inet_pton(socket.AF_INET6, sys.argv[1])
    result=0
except socket.error:
    result=1
sys.exit(result)

See also Checking for IP addresses

1
  • 2
    Thanks for your answer. It's acceptable but I'm still looking forward for another solution without involving another language. Commented Nov 10, 2014 at 2:45
3

Here is a solution in POSIX compatible shell script that handles IPv4 and IPv6 addresses with an optional subnet mask. To test an IP that should not have a subnet mask just pass it a dummy one when performing the test. It seems like a lot of code but it should be significantly faster than using external programs like grep or scripts that are likely to fork.

Single IPv6 zero groups compressed to :: will be treated as invalid. The use of such representation is strongly discouraged, but technically correct. There is a note in the code explaining how to alter this behaivour if you wish to allow such addresses.

#!/bin/sh
set -e

# return nonzero unless $1 contains only digits, leading zeroes not allowed
is_numeric() {
    case "$1" in
        "" | *[![:digit:]]* | 0[[:digit:]]* ) return 1;;
    esac
}

# return nonzero unless $1 contains only hexadecimal digits
is_hex() {
    case "$1" in
        "" | *[![:xdigit:]]* ) return 1;;
    esac
}

# return nonzero unless $1 is a valid IPv4 address with optional trailing subnet mask in the format /<bits>
is_ip4() {

    # fail if $1 is not set, move it into a variable so we can mangle it 
    [ -n "$1" ] || return
    IP4_ADDR="$1"

    # handle subnet mask for any address containing a /
    case "$IP4_ADDR" in
        *"/"* ) # set $IP4_GROUP to the number of bits (the characters after the last /)
                IP4_GROUP="${IP4_ADDR##*"/"}"

                # return failure unless $IP4_GROUP is a positive integer less than or equal to 32
                is_numeric "$IP4_GROUP" && [ "$IP4_GROUP" -le 32 ] || return

                # remove the subnet mask from the address
                IP4_ADDR="${IP4_ADDR%"/$IP4_GROUP"}";;
    esac

    # backup current $IFS, set $IFS to . as that's what separates digit groups (octets)
    IP4_IFS="$IFS"; IFS="."

    # initialize count
    IP4_COUNT=0

    # loop over digit groups
    for IP4_GROUP in $IP4_ADDR ;do  
        # return failure if group is not numeric or if it is greater than 255
        ! is_numeric "$IP4_GROUP" || [ "$IP4_GROUP" -gt 255 ] && IFS="$IP4_IFS" && return 1

        # increment count
        IP4_COUNT=$(( IP4_COUNT + 1 ))

        # the following line will prevent the loop continuing to run for invalid addresses with many occurrences of .
        # this makes no difference to the result, but may improve performance when validating many such invalid strings
        [ "$IP4_COUNT" -le 4 ] || break
    done

    # restore $IFS
    IFS="$IP4_IFS"

    # return success if there are 4 digit groups, otherwise return failure
    [ "$IP4_COUNT" -eq 4 ]
}

# return nonzero unless $1 is a valid IPv6 address with optional trailing subnet mask in the format /<bits>
is_ip6() {
    # fail if $1 is not set, move it into a variable so we can mangle it 
    [ -n "$1" ] || return
    IP6_ADDR="$1"

    # handle subnet mask for any address containing a /
    case "$IP6_ADDR" in
        *"/"* ) # set $IP6_GROUP to the number of bits (the characters after the last /)
                IP6_GROUP="${IP6_ADDR##*"/"}"

                # return failure unless $IP6_GROUP is a positive integer less than or equal to 128
                is_numeric "$IP6_GROUP" && [ "$IP6_GROUP" -le 128 ] || return

                # remove the subnet mask from the address
                IP6_ADDR="${IP6_ADDR%"/$IP6_GROUP"}";;
    esac

    # perform some preliminary tests and check for the presence of ::
    case "$IP6_ADDR" in
        # failure cases
        # *"::"*"::"*  matches multiple occurrences of ::
        # *":::"*      matches three or more consecutive occurrences of :
        # *[^:]":"     matches trailing single :
        # *"."*":"*    matches : after .
        *"::"*"::"* | *":::"* | *[^:]":" | *"."*":"* ) return 1;;

        *"::"* ) # set flag $IP6_EXPANDED to true, to allow for a variable number of digit groups
                 IP6_EXPANDED=0

                 # because :: should not be used for remove a single zero group we start the group count at 1 when :: exists
                 # NOTE This is a strict interpretation of the standard, applications should not generate such IP addresses but (I think)
                 #      they are in fact technically valid. To allow addresses with single zero groups replaced by :: set $IP6_COUNT to 
                 #      zero after this case statement instead
                 IP6_COUNT=1;; 

        *      ) # set flag $IP6_EXPANDED to false, to forbid a variable number of digit groups
                 IP6_EXPANDED=""

                 # initialize count
                 IP6_COUNT=0;;
    esac
    # backup current $IFS, set $IFS to : to delimit digit groups
    IP6_IFS="$IFS"; IFS=":"

    # loop over digit groups
    for IP6_GROUP in $IP6_ADDR ;do
        # if this is an empty group then increment count and process next group
        [ -z "$IP6_GROUP" ] && IP6_COUNT=$(( IP6_COUNT + 1 )) && continue

        # handle dotted quad notation groups
        case "$IP6_GROUP" in
            *"."* ) # return failure if group is not a valid IPv4 address
                    # NOTE a subnet mask is added to the group to ensure we are matching addresses only, not ranges
                    ! is_ip4 "$IP6_GROUP/1" && IFS="$IP6_IFS" && return 1

                    # a dotted quad refers to 32 bits, the same as two 16 bit digit groups, so we increment the count by 2
                    IP6_COUNT=$(( IP6_COUNT + 2 ))

                    # we can stop processing groups now as we can be certain this is the last group, : after . was caught as a failure case earlier
                    break;;
        esac

        # if there are more than 4 characters or any character is not a hex digit then return failure
        [ "${#IP6_GROUP}" -gt 4 ] || ! is_hex "$IP6_GROUP" && IFS="$IP6_IFS" && return 1

        # increment count
        IP6_COUNT=$(( IP6_COUNT + 1 ))

        # the following line will prevent the loop continuing to run for invalid addresses with many occurrences of a single :
        # this makes no difference to the result, but may improve performance when validating many such invalid strings
        [ "$IP6_COUNT" -le 8 ] || break
    done

    # restore $IFS
    IFS="$IP6_IFS"

    # if this address contained a :: and it has less than or equal to 8 groups then return success 
    [ "$IP6_EXPANDED" = "0" ] && [ "$IP6_COUNT" -le 8 ] && return

    # if this address contained exactly 8 groups then return success, otherwise return failure
    [ "$IP6_COUNT" -eq 8 ]
}

Here are some tests.

# tests
TEST_PASSES=0
TEST_FAILURES=0
for TEST_IP in 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 1.2.3.4/1 1.2.3.4/32 12.12.12.12 123.123.123.123 101.201.201.109 ;do
    ! is_ip4 "$TEST_IP" && printf "IP4 test failed, test case '%s' returned invalid\n" "$TEST_IP" && TEST_FAILURES=$(( TEST_FAILURES + 1 )) || TEST_PASSES=$(( TEST_PASSES + 1 )) 
done
for TEST_IP in ::1 ::1/128 ::1/0 ::1234 ::bad ::12 1:2:3:4:5:6:7:8 1234:5678:90ab:cdef:1234:5678:90ab:cdef \
               1234:5678:90ab:cdef:1234:5678:90ab:cdef/127 1234:5678:90ab::5678:90ab:cdef/64 f:1234:c:ba:240::1 \
               1:2:3:4:5:6:1.2.3.4 ::1.2.3.4 ::1.2.3.4/0 ::ffff:1.2.3.4 ;do
    ! is_ip6 "$TEST_IP" && printf "IP6 test failed, test case '%s' returned invalid\n" "$TEST_IP" && TEST_FAILURES=$(( TEST_FAILURES + 1 )) || TEST_PASSES=$(( TEST_PASSES + 1 )) 
done
for TEST_IP in junk . / 0 -1.0.0.0 1.2.c.0 a.0.0.0 " 1.2.3.4" "1.2.3.4 " " " 01.0.0.0 09.0.0.0 0.0.0.01 \
               0.0.0.09 0.09.0.0.0 0.01.0.0 0.0.01.0 0.0.0.a 0.0.0 .0.0.0.0 256.0.0.0 0.0.0.256 "" 0 1 12 \
               123 1.2.3.4/s 1.2.3.4/33 1.2.3.4/1/1 ;do
    is_ip4 "$TEST_IP" && printf "IP4 test failed, test case '%s' returned valid\n" "$TEST_IP" && TEST_FAILURES=$(( TEST_FAILURES + 1 )) || TEST_PASSES=$(( TEST_PASSES + 1 )) 
done
for TEST_IP in junk "" : / :1 ::1/ ::1/1/1 :::1 ::1/129 ::12345 ::bog ::1234:345.234.0.0 ::sdf.d ::1g2 \
               1:2:3:44444:5:6:7:8 1:2:3:4:5:6:7 1:2:3:4:5:6:7:8/1c1 1234:5678:90ab:cdef:1234:5678:90ab:cdef:1234/64 \
               1234:5678:90ab:cdef:1234:5678::cdef/64  ::1.2.3.4:1 1.2.3.4:: ::1.2.3.4j ::1.2.3.4/ ::1.2.3.4:junk ::1.2.3.4.junk ;do
    is_ip6 "$TEST_IP" && printf "IP6 test failed, test case '%s' returned valid\n" "$TEST_IP" && TEST_FAILURES=$(( TEST_FAILURES + 1 )) || TEST_PASSES=$(( TEST_PASSES + 1 )) 
done
printf "test complete, %s passes and %s failures\n" "$TEST_PASSES" "$TEST_FAILURES"
1
  • 1
    @mklement0I think every modern shell except posh supports local, but yes, it isn't strictly POSIX. It would be a simple matter to clear $Group and $Expanded and ensure that $IFS isn't clobbered
    – FlakBlag
    Commented Dec 10, 2016 at 4:30
1
 valid_ip(){ 
 ip -6 route get "$1"/128 >/dev/null 2>&1  
 case "$?" in
  0|2) return 0
  1) return 1
 esac
 }

i took sgundlach's answer, but needed it on a machine which did not have ip6 connectivity so through testing and reading the manpage I found that I can trust exit code 1 to mean the syntax is invalid, meanwhile 0 is success and 2 is valid syntax but kernel error reported.

from the man page:

   Exit status is 0 if command was successful, and 1 if there is a syntax error.  If an error was reported by the kernel exit status is 2.

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