I was asked this question in a job interview, and I'd like to know how others would solve it. I'm most comfortable with Java, but solutions in other languages are welcome.

Given an array of numbers, nums, return an array of numbers products, where products[i] is the product of all nums[j], j != i.

Input : [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
Output: [(2*3*4*5), (1*3*4*5), (1*2*4*5), (1*2*3*5), (1*2*3*4)]
      = [120, 60, 40, 30, 24]

You must do this in O(N) without using division.

  • 39
    This question has come up a few times in the last week or so; are you all interviewing with the same company? :) – Michael Mrozek Apr 21 '10 at 5:31
  • I'm currently browsing [interview-questions] tag looking for it. Do you have a link if you've found it? – polygenelubricants Apr 21 '10 at 5:34
  • 1
    @Michael: That question allows division. Mine explicitly forbids it. I'd say they're two different questions. – polygenelubricants Apr 21 '10 at 5:47
  • 7
    Substitute division with log(a/b)=log(a)-log(b) and voila! – ldog Jul 19 '13 at 2:06
  • 1
    imagine if there are 1 or more than 1 zeros in the array, how will you handle the case?? – Venkatesh Kuppan Dec 25 '13 at 17:09

36 Answers 36

up vote 215 down vote accepted

An explanation of polygenelubricants method is: The trick is to construct the arrays (in the case for 4 elements)

{              1,         a[0],    a[0]*a[1],    a[0]*a[1]*a[2],  }
{ a[1]*a[2]*a[3],    a[2]*a[3],         a[3],                 1,  }

Both of which can be done in O(n) by starting at the left and right edges respectively.

Then multiplying the two arrays element by element gives the required result

My code would look something like this:

int a[N] // This is the input
int products_below[N];
p=1;
for(int i=0;i<N;++i) {
  products_below[i]=p;
  p*=a[i];
}

int products_above[N];
p=1;
for(int i=N-1;i>=0;--i) {
  products_above[i]=p;
  p*=a[i];
}

int products[N]; // This is the result
for(int i=0;i<N;++i) {
  products[i]=products_below[i]*products_above[i];
}

If you need to be O(1) in space too you can do this (which is less clear IMHO)

int a[N] // This is the input
int products[N];

// Get the products below the current index
p=1;
for(int i=0;i<N;++i) {
  products[i]=p;
  p*=a[i];
}

// Get the products above the curent index
p=1;
for(int i=N-1;i>=0;--i) {
  products[i]*=p;
  p*=a[i];
}
  • 3
    This is O(n) runtime but it's also O(n) in space complexity. You can do it in O(1) space. I mean, other than the size of the input and output containers of course. – wilhelmtell Apr 21 '10 at 6:36
  • 8
    Very clever! Is there a name for this algorithm? – fastcodejava May 30 '10 at 23:36
  • 2
    @MichaelAnderson Great work man, But please tell me the main logic behind this and how did you start this once you get the requirement. – A.C.Balaji Jul 23 '12 at 10:33
  • 1
    @A.C.Balaji It all kinda falls out after you do that split into two separate arrays. The second case does the same work, but is tweaked to store results directly into the products array. Is there some other aspect of this that I could clarify for you? – Michael Anderson Jul 23 '12 at 23:46
  • 3
    Algorithm will fail if any one of the element is 0. So don't forgot to check the 0 to skip. – Mani Jan 16 '14 at 0:19

Here is a small recursive function (in C++) to do the modofication in place. It requires O(n) extra space (on stack) though. Assuming the array is in a and N holds the array length, we have

int multiply(int *a, int fwdProduct, int indx) {
    int revProduct = 1;
    if (indx < N) {
       revProduct = multiply(a, fwdProduct*a[indx], indx+1);
       int cur = a[indx];
       a[indx] = fwdProduct * revProduct;
       revProduct *= cur;
    }
    return revProduct;
}
  • 4
    OMG! I've never seen such a beautiful recursive technique! +1! – polygenelubricants Apr 23 '10 at 3:49
  • Could anyone explain this recursion? – nikhil Jul 8 '12 at 12:35
  • 1
    @nikhil It does recursion first, remembering the intermediate products , eventually forming the number product for num[N-1]; then on the way back it calculates the second part of the multiplication which is then used to modify the number array in place. – Ja͢ck Aug 28 '12 at 5:19
  • imagine if there are 1 or more than 1 zeros in the array, how will you handle the case?? – Venkatesh Kuppan Dec 25 '13 at 17:09

Here's my attempt to solve it in Java. Apologies for the non-standard formatting, but the code has a lot of duplication, and this is the best I can do to make it readable.

import java.util.Arrays;

public class Products {
    static int[] products(int... nums) {
        final int N = nums.length;
        int[] prods = new int[N];
        Arrays.fill(prods, 1);
        for (int
           i = 0, pi = 1    ,  j = N-1, pj = 1  ;
           (i < N)         && (j >= 0)          ;
           pi *= nums[i++]  ,  pj *= nums[j--]  )
        {
           prods[i] *= pi   ;  prods[j] *= pj   ;
        }
        return prods;
    }
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(
            Arrays.toString(products(1, 2, 3, 4, 5))
        ); // prints "[120, 60, 40, 30, 24]"
    }
}

The loop invariants are pi = nums[0] * nums[1] *.. nums[i-1] and pj = nums[N-1] * nums[N-2] *.. nums[j+1]. The i part on the left is the "prefix" logic, and the j part on the right is the "suffix" logic.


Recursive one-liner

Jasmeet gave a (beautiful!) recursive solution; I've turned it into this (hideous!) Java one-liner. It does in-place modification, with O(N) temporary space in the stack.

static int multiply(int[] nums, int p, int n) {
    return (n == nums.length) ? 1
      : nums[n] * (p = multiply(nums, nums[n] * (nums[n] = p), n + 1))
          + 0*(nums[n] *= p);
}

int[] arr = {1,2,3,4,5};
multiply(arr, 1, 0);
System.out.println(Arrays.toString(arr));
// prints "[120, 60, 40, 30, 24]"
  • 3
    I think the 2-variables loop makes it harder to understand than necessary (at least for my poor brain!), two separate loops would do the job as well. – Guillaume Apr 21 '10 at 6:17
  • That's why I separated the code into left/right, in an effort to show that the two are independent of each other. I'm not sure if that actually works, though =) – polygenelubricants Apr 21 '10 at 6:22

Translating Michael Anderson's solution into Haskell:

otherProducts xs = zipWith (*) below above

     where below = scanl (*) 1 $ init xs

           above = tail $ scanr (*) 1 xs

Sneakily circumventing the "no divisions" rule:

sum = 0.0
for i in range(a):
  sum += log(a[i])

for i in range(a):
  output[i] = exp(sum - log(a[i]))
  • 1
    Nitpick: as far as I'm aware, computers implement logarithms using their binomial expansion - which does require division... – Josef K Jun 25 '10 at 15:44
  • 1
    That would result in floating point output though... – Alderath Jul 27 '10 at 11:39

Here you go, simple and clean solution with O(N) complexity:

int[] a = {1,2,3,4,5};
    int[] r = new int[a.length];
    int x = 1;
    r[0] = 1;
    for (int i=1;i<a.length;i++){
        r[i]=r[i-1]*a[i-1];
    }
    for (int i=a.length-1;i>0;i--){
        x=x*a[i];
        r[i-1]=x*r[i-1];
    }
    for (int i=0;i<r.length;i++){
        System.out.println(r[i]);
    }

C++, O(n):

long long prod = accumulate(in.begin(), in.end(), 1LL, multiplies<int>());
transform(in.begin(), in.end(), back_inserter(res),
          bind1st(divides<long long>(), prod));
  • 8
    division is not allowed – Michael Anderson Apr 21 '10 at 6:49
  • That's still an awesome looking code, though. With disclaimer that it uses division, I'd still upvote if given explanation. – polygenelubricants Apr 21 '10 at 7:05
  • Damn, I didn't read the question through. :s @polygenelubricants explanation: the idea is to do it in two steps. First take the factorial of the first sequence of numbers. That's what the accumulate algorithm does (by default adds numbers, but can take any other binary operation to replace the addition, in this case a multiplication). Next I iterated over the input sequence a second time, transforming it such that the corresponding element in the output sequence the factorial I calculated in the previous step divided by the corresponding element in the input sequence. – wilhelmtell Apr 21 '10 at 7:10
  • 1
    "factorial of the first sequence"? wtf? i meant the product of the sequence elements. – wilhelmtell Apr 21 '10 at 8:25
  1. Travel Left->Right and keep saving product. Call it Past. -> O(n)
  2. Travel Right -> left keep the product. Call it Future. -> O(n)
  3. Result[i] = Past[i-1] * future[i+1] -> O(n)
  4. Past[-1] = 1; and Future[n+1]=1;

O(n)

Here is my solution in modern C++. It makes use of std::transform and is pretty easy to remember.

Online code (wandbox).

#include<algorithm>
#include<iostream>
#include<vector>

using namespace std;

vector<int>& multiply_up(vector<int>& v){
    v.insert(v.begin(),1);
    transform(v.begin()+1, v.end()
             ,v.begin()
             ,v.begin()+1
             ,[](auto const& a, auto const& b) { return b*a; }
             );
    v.pop_back();
    return v;
}

int main() {
    vector<int> v = {1,2,3,4,5};
    auto vr = v;

    reverse(vr.begin(),vr.end());
    multiply_up(v);
    multiply_up(vr);
    reverse(vr.begin(),vr.end());

    transform(v.begin(),v.end()
             ,vr.begin()
             ,v.begin()
             ,[](auto const& a, auto const& b) { return b*a; }
             );

    for(auto& i: v) cout << i << " "; 
}

This is O(n^2) but f# is soooo beautiful:

List.fold (fun seed i -> List.mapi (fun j x -> if i=j+1 then x else x*i) seed) 
          [1;1;1;1;1]
          [1..5]
  • I'm not sure that either an enormous one liner or an O(n^2) solution to an O(n) problem are ever "beautiful". – Mad Physicist Jan 9 at 16:17

Tricky:

Use the following:

public int[] calc(int[] params) {

int[] left = new int[n-1]
in[] right = new int[n-1]

int fac1 = 1;
int fac2 = 1;
for( int i=0; i<n; i++ ) {
    fac1 = fac1 * params[i];
    fac2 = fac2 * params[n-i];
    left[i] = fac1;
    right[i] = fac2; 
}
fac = 1;

int[] results = new int[n];
for( int i=0; i<n; i++ ) {
    results[i] = left[i] * right[i];
}

Yes, I am sure i missed some i-1 instead of i, but thats the way to solve it.

There also is a O(N^(3/2)) non-optimal solution. It is quite interesting, though.

First preprocess each partial multiplications of size N^0.5(this is done in O(N) time complexity). Then, calculation for each number's other-values'-multiple can be done in 2*O(N^0.5) time(why? because you only need to multiple the last elements of other ((N^0.5) - 1) numbers, and multiply the result with ((N^0.5) - 1) numbers that belong to the group of the current number). Doing this for each number, one can get O(N^(3/2)) time.

Example:

4 6 7 2 3 1 9 5 8

partial results: 4*6*7 = 168 2*3*1 = 6 9*5*8 = 360

To calculate the value of 3, one needs to multiply the other groups' values 168*360, and then with 2*1.

public static void main(String[] args) {
    int[] arr = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
    int[] result = { 1, 1, 1, 1, 1 };
    for (int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < i; j++) {
            result[i] *= arr[j];

        }
        for (int k = arr.length - 1; k > i; k--) {
            result[i] *= arr[k];
        }
    }
    for (int i : result) {
        System.out.println(i);
    }
}

This solution i came up with and i found it so clear what do you think!?

  • Your solution appears to have O(n^2) time complexity. – Mad Physicist Jan 9 at 16:19

Precalculate the product of the numbers to the left and to the right of each element. For every element the desired value is the product of it's neigbors's products.

#include <stdio.h>

unsigned array[5] = { 1,2,3,4,5};

int main(void)
{
unsigned idx;

unsigned left[5]
        , right[5];
left[0] = 1;
right[4] = 1;

        /* calculate products of numbers to the left of [idx] */
for (idx=1; idx < 5; idx++) {
        left[idx] = left[idx-1] * array[idx-1];
        }

        /* calculate products of numbers to the right of [idx] */
for (idx=4; idx-- > 0; ) {
        right[idx] = right[idx+1] * array[idx+1];
        }

for (idx=0; idx <5 ; idx++) {
        printf("[%u] Product(%u*%u) = %u\n"
                , idx, left[idx] , right[idx]  , left[idx] * right[idx]  );
        }

return 0;
}

Result:

$ ./a.out
[0] Product(1*120) = 120
[1] Product(1*60) = 60
[2] Product(2*20) = 40
[3] Product(6*5) = 30
[4] Product(24*1) = 24

(UPDATE: now I look closer, this uses the same method as Michael Anderson, Daniel Migowski and polygenelubricants above)

  • What is the name of this algorithm? – onepiece Feb 8 '16 at 17:13
def productify(arr, prod, i):
    if i < len(arr):
            prod.append(arr[i - 1] * prod[i - 1]) if i > 0 else prod.append(1)
            retval = productify(arr, prod, i + 1)
            prod[i] *= retval
            return retval * arr[i]
    return 1

arr = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5] prod = [] productify(arr, prod, 0) print prod

Adding my javascript solution here as I didn't find anyone suggesting this. What is to divide, except to count the number of times you can extract a number from another number? I went through calculating the product of the whole array, and then iterate over each element, and substracting the current element until zero:

//No division operation allowed
// keep substracting divisor from dividend, until dividend is zero or less than divisor
function calculateProducsExceptCurrent_NoDivision(input){
  var res = [];
  var totalProduct = 1;
  //calculate the total product
  for(var i = 0; i < input.length; i++){
    totalProduct = totalProduct * input[i];
  }
  //populate the result array by "dividing" each value
  for(var i = 0; i < input.length; i++){
    var timesSubstracted = 0;
    var divisor = input[i];
    var dividend = totalProduct;
    while(divisor <= dividend){
      dividend = dividend - divisor;
      timesSubstracted++;
    }
    res.push(timesSubstracted);
  }
  return res;
}

I'm use to C#:

    public int[] ProductExceptSelf(int[] nums)
    {
        int[] returnArray = new int[nums.Length];
        List<int> auxList = new List<int>();
        int multTotal = 0;

        // If no zeros are contained in the array you only have to calculate it once
        if(!nums.Contains(0))
        {
            multTotal = nums.ToList().Aggregate((a, b) => a * b);

            for (int i = 0; i < nums.Length; i++)
            {
                returnArray[i] = multTotal / nums[i];
            }
        }
        else
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < nums.Length; i++)
            {
                auxList = nums.ToList();
                auxList.RemoveAt(i);
                if (!auxList.Contains(0))
                {
                    returnArray[i] = auxList.Aggregate((a, b) => a * b);
                }
                else
                {
                    returnArray[i] = 0;
                }
            }
        }            

        return returnArray;
    }

Well,this solution can be considered that of C/C++. Lets say we have an array "a" containing n elements like a[n],then the pseudo code would be as below.

for(j=0;j<n;j++)
  { 
    prod[j]=1;

    for (i=0;i<n;i++)
    {   
        if(i==j)
        continue;  
        else
        prod[j]=prod[j]*a[i];
  }

One more solution, Using division. with twice traversal. Multiply all the elements and then start dividing it by each element.

{-
Recursive solution using sqrt(n) subsets. Runs in O(n).

Recursively computes the solution on sqrt(n) subsets of size sqrt(n). 
Then recurses on the product sum of each subset.
Then for each element in each subset, it computes the product with
the product sum of all other products.
Then flattens all subsets.

Recurrence on the run time is T(n) = sqrt(n)*T(sqrt(n)) + T(sqrt(n)) + n

Suppose that T(n) ≤ cn in O(n).

T(n) = sqrt(n)*T(sqrt(n)) + T(sqrt(n)) + n
    ≤ sqrt(n)*c*sqrt(n) + c*sqrt(n) + n
    ≤ c*n + c*sqrt(n) + n
    ≤ (2c+1)*n
    ∈ O(n)

Note that ceiling(sqrt(n)) can be computed using a binary search 
and O(logn) iterations, if the sqrt instruction is not permitted.
-}

otherProducts [] = []
otherProducts [x] = [1]
otherProducts [x,y] = [y,x]
otherProducts a = foldl' (++) [] $ zipWith (\s p -> map (*p) s) solvedSubsets subsetOtherProducts
    where 
      n = length a

      -- Subset size. Require that 1 < s < n.
      s = ceiling $ sqrt $ fromIntegral n

      solvedSubsets = map otherProducts subsets
      subsetOtherProducts = otherProducts $ map product subsets

      subsets = reverse $ loop a []
          where loop [] acc = acc
                loop a acc = loop (drop s a) ((take s a):acc)

Here is my code:

int multiply(int a[],int n,int nextproduct,int i)
{
    int prevproduct=1;
    if(i>=n)
        return prevproduct;
    prevproduct=multiply(a,n,nextproduct*a[i],i+1);
    printf(" i=%d > %d\n",i,prevproduct*nextproduct);
    return prevproduct*a[i];
}

int main()
{
    int a[]={2,4,1,3,5};
    multiply(a,5,1,0);
    return 0;
}

Here's a slightly functional example, using C#:

            Func<long>[] backwards = new Func<long>[input.Length];
            Func<long>[] forwards = new Func<long>[input.Length];

            for (int i = 0; i < input.Length; ++i)
            {
                var localIndex = i;
                backwards[i] = () => (localIndex > 0 ? backwards[localIndex - 1]() : 1) * input[localIndex];
                forwards[i] = () => (localIndex < input.Length - 1 ? forwards[localIndex + 1]() : 1) * input[localIndex];
            }

            var output = new long[input.Length];
            for (int i = 0; i < input.Length; ++i)
            {
                if (0 == i)
                {
                    output[i] = forwards[i + 1]();
                }
                else if (input.Length - 1 == i)
                {
                    output[i] = backwards[i - 1]();
                }
                else
                {
                    output[i] = forwards[i + 1]() * backwards[i - 1]();
                }
            }

I'm not entirely certain that this is O(n), due to the semi-recursion of the created Funcs, but my tests seem to indicate that it's O(n) in time.

To be complete here is the code in Scala:

val list1 = List(1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
for (elem <- list1) println(list1.filter(_ != elem) reduceLeft(_*_))

This will print out the following:

120
60
40
30
24

The program will filter out the current elem (_ != elem); and multiply the new list with reduceLeft method. I think this will be O(n) if you use scala view or Iterator for lazy eval.

  • Despite is very elegant, it doesn't work if there are more elements with the same value: val list1 = List(1, 7, 3, 3, 4, 4) – Giordano Scalzo Nov 6 '14 at 14:29
  • I tested the code again with repeating values. It produces the following 1008 144 112 112 63 63 I think that it is correct for the given element. – Billz Nov 7 '14 at 6:44

// This is the recursive solution in Java // Called as following from main product(a,1,0);

public static double product(double[] a, double fwdprod, int index){
    double revprod = 1;
    if (index < a.length){
        revprod = product2(a, fwdprod*a[index], index+1);
        double cur = a[index];
        a[index] = fwdprod * revprod;
        revprod *= cur;
    }
    return revprod;
}

A neat solution with O(n) runtime:

  1. For each element calculate the product of all the elements that occur before that and it store in an array "pre".
  2. For each element calculate the product of all the elements that occur after that element and store it in an array "post"
  3. Create a final array "result", for an element i,

    result[i] = pre[i-1]*post[i+1];
    
  • 1
    This is the same solution as the accepted one, right? – Thomas Ahle Nov 11 '14 at 22:53
function solution($array)
{
    $result = [];
    foreach($array as $key => $value){
        $copyOfOriginalArray = $array;
        unset($copyOfOriginalArray[$key]);
        $result[$key] = multiplyAllElemets($copyOfOriginalArray);
    }
    return $result;
}

/**
 * multiplies all elements of array
 * @param $array
 * @return int
 */
function multiplyAllElemets($array){
    $result = 1;
    foreach($array as $element){
        $result *= $element;
    }
    return $result;
}

$array = [1, 9, 2, 7];

print_r(solution($array));

Here is another simple concept which solves the problem in O(N).

        int[] arr = new int[] {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
        int[] outArray = new int[arr.length]; 
        for(int i=0;i<arr.length;i++){
            int res=Arrays.stream(arr).reduce(1, (a, b) -> a * b);
            outArray[i] = res/arr[i];
        }
        System.out.println(Arrays.toString(outArray));

We can exclude the nums[j] (where j != i) from list first, then get the product of the rest; The following is a python way to solve this puzzle:

def products(nums):
    return [ reduce(lambda x,y: x * y, nums[:i] + nums[i+1:]) for i in range(len(nums)) ]
print products([1, 2, 3, 4, 5])

[out]
[120, 60, 40, 30, 24]

Based on Billz answer--sorry I can't comment, but here is a scala version that correctly handles duplicate items in the list, and is probably O(n):

val list1 = List(1, 7, 3, 3, 4, 4)
val view = list1.view.zipWithIndex map { x => list1.view.patch(x._2, Nil, 1).reduceLeft(_*_)}
view.force

returns:

List(1008, 144, 336, 336, 252, 252)

I have a solution with O(n) space and O(n^2) time complexity provided below,

public static int[] findEachElementAsProduct1(final int[] arr) {

        int len = arr.length;

//        int[] product = new int[len];
//        Arrays.fill(product, 1);

        int[] product = IntStream.generate(() -> 1).limit(len).toArray();


        for (int i = 0; i < len; i++) {

            for (int j = 0; j < len; j++) {

                if (i == j) {
                    continue;
                }

                product[i] *= arr[j];
            }
        }

        return product;
    }

protected by Community Nov 17 '16 at 4:53

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