In ‘Practical type inference for arbitrary-rank types’, the authors talk about subsumption:

3.3 Subsumption

I try to test things in GHCi as I read, but even though g k2 is meant to typecheck, it doesn't when I try with GHC 7.8.3:

λ> :set -XRankNTypes
λ> let g :: ((forall b. [b] -> [b]) -> Int) -> Int; g = undefined
λ> let k1 :: (forall a. a -> a) -> Int; k1 = undefined
λ> let k2 :: ([Int] -> [Int]) -> Int; k2 = undefined
λ> :t g k1

<interactive>:1:3: Warning:
    Couldn't match type ‘a’ with ‘[a]’
      ‘a’ is a rigid type variable bound by
          the type forall a1. a1 -> a1 at <interactive>:1:3
    Expected type: (forall b. [b] -> [b]) -> Int
      Actual type: (forall a. a -> a) -> Int
    In the first argument of ‘g’, namely ‘k1’
    In the expression: g k1
g k1 :: Int
λ> :t g k2

<interactive>:1:3: Warning:
    Couldn't match type ‘[Int] -> [Int]’ with ‘forall b. [b] -> [b]’
    Expected type: (forall b. [b] -> [b]) -> Int
      Actual type: ([Int] -> [Int]) -> Int
    In the first argument of ‘g’, namely ‘k2’
    In the expression: g k2
g k2 :: Int

I haven't really gotten to the point where I understand the paper, yet, but still, I worry that I have misunderstood something. Should this typecheck? Are my Haskell types wrong?

up vote 17 down vote accepted

The typechecker doesn't know when to apply the subsumption rule.

You can tell it when with the following function.

Prelude> let u :: ((f a -> f a) -> c) -> ((forall b. f b -> f b) -> c); u f n = f n

This says, given a function from a transformation for a specific type, we can make a function from a natural transformation forall b. f b -> f b.

We can then try it successfully on the second example.

Prelude> :t g (u k2)
g (u k2) :: Int

The first example now gives a more informative error as well.

Prelude> :t g (u k1)
    Couldn't match type `forall a. a -> a' with `[a0] -> [a0]'
    Expected type: ([a0] -> [a0]) -> Int
      Actual type: (forall a. a -> a) -> Int
    In the first argument of `u', namely `k1'
    In the first argument of `g', namely `(u k1)'

I don't know if we can write a more general version of u; we'd need a constraint-level notion of less polymorphic to write something like let s :: (a :<: b) => (a -> c) -> (b -> c); s f x = f x

  • 4
    This is a great example of Haskell not taking its own notion of subtyping seriously... But it's generally not so bad to be a little more explicit when you need it. – J. Abrahamson Nov 7 '14 at 18:59
  • 2
    GHC, you disappoint me. I was so sure GHC got this right I even glossed over my stupid mistake in my deleted answer here. – András Kovács Nov 7 '14 at 19:05
  • 3
    The type checker as described in the paper does know when to apply the subsumtion rule. It's apparently just GHC. I know this because I implemented the type checker described in that paper in Frege, and the Frege typechecker accepts g k2 without complaints. (See here for an example: github.com/Frege/frege/issues/80#issuecomment-62257574) – Ingo Nov 8 '14 at 13:31

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