2

So i want to get random elements of a list with uniform distribution in Java. I know that in the Random class, for example the nextInt method, already give me something like that:

Returns a pseudorandom, uniformly distributed int value between 0 (inclusive) and the specified value (exclusive), drawn from this random number generator's sequence.

So given something like the code below:

Random rnd = new Random();
int numTimes = 10;
for(int i = 0; i < numTimes*n; i++){
   System.out.println(rnd.nextInt(10));
}

I expect that for small "n" I can't quite see a good uniform distribution, probably increasing it, I will see something better. So my question is, how can I guarantee a uniform distribution within smaller n, or in other words, with "n = 2" how can I get every number at least once?


Trying to explain better: giving 10-number range dataset, and for example 20 iterations, is there a way that each number is printed 1-3 times, in other words, at least once?

4
  • 4
    If you're guaranteeing it, then it's not random anymore... Nov 8 '14 at 5:06
  • In a (discrete) uniform distribution, each value has an equal chance of occurring. It doesn't mean that each value occurs an equal number of time. There's nothing wrong with your code for small "n". Nov 8 '14 at 5:31
  • Do you want it to be uniformly random, or do you want to see each number an equal number of times?
    – user253751
    Nov 8 '14 at 5:33
  • I agree with you, maybe I was just dreaming with something like "randomly get all the files from a list with a fixed number of iterations". It's possible to check if the position was already accessed somehow to guarantee it somehow, but it'll be very inefficient, I think. I was hoping to see some directions if my benchmark can work the way that I want. Nov 8 '14 at 5:40
0

If you want to generate numbers that occur exactly the same number of times (which is not the same as a uniform distribution), then there is a better way to do it.

int n = 2; // your "n"
int t = 100; // how often you want each number x to occur, where 0 <= x < n

// Build a list of numbers
List<Integer> l = new ArrayList<>();
for (int i = 0; i < t; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < n; j++) {
        l.add(j);
    }
}
// Shuffle the list randomly; this ensures the order is random but each number x occurs
// as often as any other x
Collections.shuffle(l);

for (Integer value : l) {
    System.out.println(value);
}

If you want to have some numbers at least once, but don't care about the others; then insert 1 of each number that you want at least once and the rest randomly. If I understand you correctly, you want the numbers 1, 2 and 3 at least once, and then randomly numbers 1, 2 and 3. So, that would be:

int n = 3; // your "n"

// Build a list of numbers
List<Integer> l = new ArrayList<>();
for (int x = 1; x <= n; x++) {
     l.add(x);
}

int t = 17; // add 17 more random numbers in range 1-3 inclusive

for (int i = 0; i < t; i++) {
    l.add(rnd.nextInt(n) + 1);
}

// Shuffle
Collections.shuffle(l);

// Print
for (Integer value : l) {
    System.out.println(value);
}
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  • Changing the for loop strategy, it almost look like what I am expecting. Considering "t = 10", doing the way that you did, I will randomly get numbers from the range [0-9] twice, is gonna be guarantee indeed. But I was hoping something like, given like 20 iterations that each number were accessed 1-3, but at least once. Nov 8 '14 at 5:57
  • If t = 10, and n = 2, you get 10 times the numbers 0 and 1. Nov 8 '14 at 15:32
  • ok, you manage to get the result that I was expecting with a nice workaround. But I don't think this is gonna be give me a better performance and like you said "In a (discrete) uniform distribution, each value has an equal chance of occurring. It doesn't mean that each value occurs an equal number of time", I just can't guarantee it. Nov 8 '14 at 19:04

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