54

I'm using protocol buffers and everything is working fine. except that the fact that I don't understand - why do I need the numbered tags in the proto file :

message SearchRequest {
  required string query = 1;
  optional int32 page_number = 2;
  optional int32 result_per_page = 3;
}

Sure I've read the docs :

As you can see, each field in the message definition has a unique numbered tag. These tags are used to identify your fields in the message binary format, and should not be changed once your message type is in use.

I didn't understand what difference does it make if I change it . ( I will create a new proto and compile it - so why does it care ?)

Another article states that :

Numbered fields in proto definitions obviate the need for version checks which is one of the explicitly stated motivations for the design and implementation of Protocol Buffers. As the developer documentation states, the protocol was designed in part to avoid “ugly code” like this for checking protocol versions:

if (version == 3) {
  ...
} else if (version > 4) {
  if (version == 5) {
    ...
  }
  ...
}

Question

Is it just me or it is completely unclear ?

let me ask it in a different way :

If I have a proto file like the above file , and then I change it to :

message SearchRequest {
  required string query = 3; //reversed order
  optional int32 page_number = 2;
  optional int32 result_per_page = 1;
}

What does it care ? I re-compile and add the file ( i've done it multiple times in the last week).

what am I missing ? can you please supply a human-to human explanation for this numbered tags ?

1
  • 2
    What does it care In my opinion, you're making a great point here. If you don't really need the backwards compatability then it feels very pointless to have to explicitly declare the numbers. They could (and for my small, internal project, should) be automatically generated.
    – birgersp
    Jul 19, 2017 at 15:42

2 Answers 2

54

The numbered tags are used to match fields when serializing and deserializing the data.

Obviously, if you change the numbering scheme, and apply this change to both serializer and deserializer, there is no issue.

Consider though, if you saved data with the first numbering scheme, and loaded it with the second one, it would try to load query into result_per_page, and deserialization would likely fail.

Now, why is this useful? Let's say you need to add another field to your data, long after the schema is already in use:

message SearchRequest {
  required string query = 1;
  optional int32 page_number = 2;
  optional int32 result_per_page = 3;
  optional int32 new_data = 4;
}

Because you explicitly give it a number, your deserializer is still able to load data serialized with the old numbering scheme, ignoring deserialization of non-existent data.

13
  • 10
    Now it's understood. was it so hard for them to example it ?
    – Royi Namir
    Nov 9, 2014 at 8:34
  • @RoyiNamir it is very well explained developers.google.com/protocol-buffers/docs/encoding. See sample as my post below
    – SMA
    Nov 9, 2014 at 8:36
  • 2
    @almasshaikh In a situation where a brief ( 15 lines!) does not explains it simply enough in a briefly way - which forces me to go to internals ---well I find that disturbing.
    – Royi Namir
    Nov 9, 2014 at 8:49
  • 1
    @RoyiNamir This thinking varies from person to person i think. It's always to be verbose rather than brief so you never get counter questions or leave reader with confusions. So nvm ;)
    – SMA
    Nov 9, 2014 at 9:35
  • 1
    @BorisMitioglov The field numbers don't represent byte offsets if that's what you mean, they are just arbitrary identifiers, but everything else you wrote is correct. In a binary format you need some system for knowing what each piece of data represents, unlike e.g. JSON where the name of the field is serialized in the message.
    – Rotem
    Oct 24, 2018 at 15:30
5

These field numbers are used by protobuf while encoding and decoding. See here for more details.

So each and every field has wire type so int32 has wire type as 0 and your field number say is 2 so it will be encoded as 0001 0000 i.e. 10 in hex.

And later on when its decoded, its left shifted by 1 which makes it as 001 0000 and last three lsb decides wire type i.e. it then makes out its of type int field and rest decides which field in proto it is i.e. 00010 is 2. So field 2 of wire type 0 (int)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.