1420

I have a dictionary where keys are strings, and values are integers.

stats = {'a': 1, 'b': 3000, 'c': 0}

How do I get the key with the maximum value? In this case, it is 'b'.


Is there a nicer approach than using an intermediate list with reversed key-value tuples?

inverse = [(value, key) for key, value in stats.items()]
print(max(inverse)[1])
3
  • 6
    Um, what's wrong with max(stats)?
    – John Red
    Dec 13, 2017 at 10:22
  • 74
    max(stats) will use the labels as keys (it will return 'c', given that's the maximum label), max(stats, key=lambda key: stats[key]) is what OP was after (which will return 'b', label of maximal indexed value). Is it any clearer?
    – Atcold
    Jan 6, 2018 at 11:59
  • 2
    This inverse = [(value, key) for key, value in stats.items()] print(max(inverse)[1]) has a limitation that it will only return one key when there are maximum value duplicates. For example, stats = {'a': 1, 'b': 3000, 'c': 3000} will only return 'c' if the requirement is to return ['b','c'] Feb 3, 2023 at 7:32

29 Answers 29

2015
max(stats, key=stats.get)
15
  • 31
    if you really wanted to do it this way you could do stats[max(stats, key=stats.get)] Feb 25, 2015 at 21:29
  • 134
    @scottmrogowski, ss. It provides the key with the maximum value, as asked. The max value would be simply max(stats.values()).
    – A. Coady
    Mar 16, 2015 at 23:28
  • 45
    This should be the answer as it is the simplest and was exactly what the OP asked for.
    – ihatecache
    Nov 21, 2015 at 16:29
  • 9
    @Coady what if there is a tie between two keys (with the same value)? I want to get them both, but I get only one.
    – oba2311
    Apr 3, 2017 at 13:09
  • 23
    @oba2311 max_value = max(stats.values()); {key for key, value in stats.items() if value == max_value}
    – A. Coady
    Apr 4, 2017 at 0:37
772

You can use operator.itemgetter for that:

import operator
stats = {'a': 1000, 'b': 3000, 'c': 100}
max(stats.iteritems(), key=operator.itemgetter(1))[0]

And instead of building a new list in memory use stats.iteritems(). The key parameter to the max() function is a function that computes a key that is used to determine how to rank items.

Please note that if you were to have another key-value pair 'd': 3000 that this method will only return one of the two even though they both have the maximum value.

>>> import operator
>>> stats = {'a': 1000, 'b': 3000, 'c': 100, 'd': 3000}
>>> max(stats.iteritems(), key=operator.itemgetter(1))[0]
'b' 

If using Python3:

>>> max(stats.items(), key=operator.itemgetter(1))[0]
'b'
10
  • 288
    Even cleaner, I think= max(stats.iterkeys(), key=(lambda key: stats[key]))
    – Lucretiel
    Dec 16, 2012 at 7:22
  • 38
    Why not just use key=lambda x: x[1]?
    – BenDundee
    Jan 23, 2014 at 22:32
  • 57
    in python 3 @Lucretiel's (correctly spelled) solution fails. it should be: max(stats.keys(), key=(lambda k: stats[k])) since keys() now does what iterkeys() used to do automatically.
    – watsonic
    May 5, 2015 at 1:58
  • 115
    Rigth you are. Interestingly, a solution that's exactly as memory efficient and works in both Python 2 and 3 is: max(stats, key=lambda key: stats[key])
    – Lucretiel
    May 5, 2015 at 21:56
  • 6
    Honestly I think that the comments have the cleaner and better solution. Sep 19, 2019 at 16:35
269

I have tested MANY variants, and this is the fastest way to return the key of dict with the max value:

def keywithmaxval(d):
     """ a) create a list of the dict's keys and values; 
         b) return the key with the max value"""  
     v = list(d.values())
     k = list(d.keys())
     return k[v.index(max(v))]

To give you an idea, here are some candidate methods:

def f1():  
     v = list(d1.values())
     k = list(d1.keys())
     return k[v.index(max(v))]
    
def f2():
    d3 = {v: k for k,v in d1.items()}
    return d3[max(d3)]
    
def f3():
    return list(filter(lambda t: t[1] == max(d1.values()), d1.items()))[0][0]    
    
def f3b():
    # same as f3 but remove the call to max from the lambda
    m = max(d1.values())
    return list(filter(lambda t: t[1] == m, d1.items()))[0][0]        
    
def f4():
    return [k for k, v in d1.items() if v == max(d1.values())][0]    
    
def f4b():
    # same as f4 but remove the max from the comprehension
    m = max(d1.values())
    return [k for k,v in d1.items() if v == m][0]        
    
def f5():
    return max(d1.items(), key=operator.itemgetter(1))[0]    
    
def f6():
    return max(d1, key=d1.get)     
    
def f7():
     """ a) create a list of the dict's keys and values; 
         b) return the key with the max value"""    
     v = list(d1.values())
     return list(d1.keys())[v.index(max(v))]    
     
def f8():
     return max(d1, key=lambda k: d1[k])     
     
tl = [f1, f2, f3b, f4b, f5, f6, f7, f8, f4, f3]     
cmpthese.cmpthese(tl, c=100) 

The test dictionary:

d1 = {1: 1, 2: 2, 3: 8, 4: 3, 5: 6, 6: 9, 7: 17, 8: 4, 9: 20, 10: 7, 11: 15, 
    12: 10, 13: 10, 14: 18, 15: 18, 16: 5, 17: 13, 18: 21, 19: 21, 20: 8, 
    21: 8, 22: 16, 23: 16, 24: 11, 25: 24, 26: 11, 27: 112, 28: 19, 29: 19, 
    30: 19, 3077: 36, 32: 6, 33: 27, 34: 14, 35: 14, 36: 22, 4102: 39, 38: 22, 
    39: 35, 40: 9, 41: 110, 42: 9, 43: 30, 44: 17, 45: 17, 46: 17, 47: 105, 48: 12, 
    49: 25, 50: 25, 51: 25, 52: 12, 53: 12, 54: 113, 1079: 50, 56: 20, 57: 33, 
    58: 20, 59: 33, 60: 20, 61: 20, 62: 108, 63: 108, 64: 7, 65: 28, 66: 28, 67: 28, 
    68: 15, 69: 15, 70: 15, 71: 103, 72: 23, 73: 116, 74: 23, 75: 15, 76: 23, 77: 23, 
    78: 36, 79: 36, 80: 10, 81: 23, 82: 111, 83: 111, 84: 10, 85: 10, 86: 31, 87: 31, 
    88: 18, 89: 31, 90: 18, 91: 93, 92: 18, 93: 18, 94: 106, 95: 106, 96: 13, 9232: 35, 
    98: 26, 99: 26, 100: 26, 101: 26, 103: 88, 104: 13, 106: 13, 107: 101, 1132: 63, 
    2158: 51, 112: 21, 113: 13, 116: 21, 118: 34, 119: 34, 7288: 45, 121: 96, 122: 21, 
    124: 109, 125: 109, 128: 8, 1154: 32, 131: 29, 134: 29, 136: 16, 137: 91, 140: 16, 
    142: 104, 143: 104, 146: 117, 148: 24, 149: 24, 152: 24, 154: 24, 155: 86, 160: 11, 
    161: 99, 1186: 76, 3238: 49, 167: 68, 170: 11, 172: 32, 175: 81, 178: 32, 179: 32, 
    182: 94, 184: 19, 31: 107, 188: 107, 190: 107, 196: 27, 197: 27, 202: 27, 206: 89, 
    208: 14, 214: 102, 215: 102, 220: 115, 37: 22, 224: 22, 226: 14, 232: 22, 233: 84, 
    238: 35, 242: 97, 244: 22, 250: 110, 251: 66, 1276: 58, 256: 9, 2308: 33, 262: 30, 
    263: 79, 268: 30, 269: 30, 274: 92, 1300: 27, 280: 17, 283: 61, 286: 105, 292: 118, 
    296: 25, 298: 25, 304: 25, 310: 87, 1336: 71, 319: 56, 322: 100, 323: 100, 325: 25, 
    55: 113, 334: 69, 340: 12, 1367: 40, 350: 82, 358: 33, 364: 95, 376: 108, 
    377: 64, 2429: 46, 394: 28, 395: 77, 404: 28, 412: 90, 1438: 53, 425: 59, 430: 103, 
    1456: 97, 433: 28, 445: 72, 448: 23, 466: 85, 479: 54, 484: 98, 485: 98, 488: 23, 
    6154: 37, 502: 67, 4616: 34, 526: 80, 538: 31, 566: 62, 3644: 44, 577: 31, 97: 119, 
    592: 26, 593: 75, 1619: 48, 638: 57, 646: 101, 650: 26, 110: 114, 668: 70, 2734: 41, 
    700: 83, 1732: 30, 719: 52, 728: 96, 754: 65, 1780: 74, 4858: 47, 130: 29, 790: 78, 
    1822: 43, 2051: 38, 808: 29, 850: 60, 866: 29, 890: 73, 911: 42, 958: 55, 970: 99, 
    976: 24, 166: 112}

And the test results under Python 3.2:

    rate/sec       f4      f3    f3b     f8     f5     f2    f4b     f6     f7     f1
f4       454       --   -2.5% -96.9% -97.5% -98.6% -98.6% -98.7% -98.7% -98.9% -99.0%
f3       466     2.6%      -- -96.8% -97.4% -98.6% -98.6% -98.6% -98.7% -98.9% -99.0%
f3b   14,715  3138.9% 3057.4%     -- -18.6% -55.5% -56.0% -56.4% -58.3% -63.8% -68.4%
f8    18,070  3877.3% 3777.3%  22.8%     -- -45.4% -45.9% -46.5% -48.8% -55.5% -61.2%
f5    33,091  7183.7% 7000.5% 124.9%  83.1%     --  -1.0%  -2.0%  -6.3% -18.6% -29.0%
f2    33,423  7256.8% 7071.8% 127.1%  85.0%   1.0%     --  -1.0%  -5.3% -17.7% -28.3%
f4b   33,762  7331.4% 7144.6% 129.4%  86.8%   2.0%   1.0%     --  -4.4% -16.9% -27.5%
f6    35,300  7669.8% 7474.4% 139.9%  95.4%   6.7%   5.6%   4.6%     -- -13.1% -24.2%
f7    40,631  8843.2% 8618.3% 176.1% 124.9%  22.8%  21.6%  20.3%  15.1%     -- -12.8%
f1    46,598 10156.7% 9898.8% 216.7% 157.9%  40.8%  39.4%  38.0%  32.0%  14.7%     --

And under Python 2.7:

    rate/sec       f3       f4     f8    f3b     f6     f5     f2    f4b     f7     f1
f3       384       --    -2.6% -97.1% -97.2% -97.9% -97.9% -98.0% -98.2% -98.5% -99.2%
f4       394     2.6%       -- -97.0% -97.2% -97.8% -97.9% -98.0% -98.1% -98.5% -99.1%
f8    13,079  3303.3%  3216.1%     --  -5.6% -28.6% -29.9% -32.8% -38.3% -49.7% -71.2%
f3b   13,852  3504.5%  3412.1%   5.9%     -- -24.4% -25.8% -28.9% -34.6% -46.7% -69.5%
f6    18,325  4668.4%  4546.2%  40.1%  32.3%     --  -1.8%  -5.9% -13.5% -29.5% -59.6%
f5    18,664  4756.5%  4632.0%  42.7%  34.7%   1.8%     --  -4.1% -11.9% -28.2% -58.8%
f2    19,470  4966.4%  4836.5%  48.9%  40.6%   6.2%   4.3%     --  -8.1% -25.1% -57.1%
f4b   21,187  5413.0%  5271.7%  62.0%  52.9%  15.6%  13.5%   8.8%     -- -18.5% -53.3%
f7    26,002  6665.8%  6492.4%  98.8%  87.7%  41.9%  39.3%  33.5%  22.7%     -- -42.7%
f1    45,354 11701.5% 11399.0% 246.8% 227.4% 147.5% 143.0% 132.9% 114.1%  74.4%     -- 

You can see that f1 is the fastest under Python 3.2 and 2.7 (or, more completely, keywithmaxval at the top of this post)

10
  • 16
    This seems fishy. f7 is like f1, just not giving a name to an intermediate object. f7 should be (very slightly) faster than f1, not much slower. And that's what I get: >>> timeit.timeit("f1()","from __main__ import f1, f7, d1", number=10000) 0.26785888786807277 >>> timeit.timeit("f7()","from __main__ import f1, f7, d1", number=10000) 0.26770628307832567 Nov 21, 2012 at 21:47
  • 2
    agree f1 is like f7. Did test with ipython %timeit and both came with same performance on my machine on python 2.7. Testing: f1 - 18 µs per loop Testing: f2 - 33.7 µs per loop Testing: f3b - 50 µs per loop Testing: f4b - 30.7 µs per loop Testing: f5 - 28 µs per loop Testing: f6 - 23 µs per loop Testing: f7 - 18 µs per loop Testing: f8 - 43.9 µs per loop Testing: f4 - 2.16 ms per loop Testing: f3 - 2.29 ms per loop
    – Joop
    Sep 17, 2014 at 8:55
  • f1 is also applicable wherever max(d, key) is not available. Mar 25, 2015 at 15:41
  • 10
    I thought dict is unsorted, couldn't d.keys and d.values theoretically be ordered differently?
    – Dimath
    Apr 1, 2015 at 13:28
  • 1
    The list-copy solutions are smelly to me. How's the performance on a dict with thousands or millions of entries?
    – Lucretiel
    Sep 29, 2015 at 18:08
144

You can use:

max(d, key=d.get) 
# which is equivalent to 
max(d, key=lambda k: d.get(k))

To return the key-value pair use:

max(d.items(), key=lambda k: k[1])
5
  • 25
    This should be the accepted answer, it's much simpler than using operator
    – Sigmatics
    Feb 23, 2020 at 14:49
  • What is the time complexity of this?
    – music2177
    Jul 26, 2020 at 1:31
  • 6
    By far the best, answer: For explanation the d.items() creates a tuple and the lambda function uses a the value of the tuple as the object to evaluate, instead of the key. Jan 18, 2021 at 19:30
  • 1
    @music2177 max() is O(n) and dict lookups are O(1) on average, so O(n).
    – wjandrea
    Nov 2, 2022 at 22:06
  • 1
    I had to use __getitem__ instead of get to calm the type-checking linters Oct 13, 2023 at 7:15
82

If you need to know only a key with the max value you can do it without iterkeys or iteritems because iteration through dictionary in Python is iteration through it's keys.

max_key = max(stats, key=lambda k: stats[k])

EDIT:

From comments, @user1274878 :

I am new to python. Can you please explain your answer in steps?

Yep...

max

max(iterable[, key])

max(arg1, arg2, *args[, key])

Return the largest item in an iterable or the largest of two or more arguments.

The optional key argument describes how to compare elements to get maximum among them:

lambda <item>: return <a result of operation with item> 

Returned values will be compared.

Dict

Python dict is a hash table. A key of dict is a hash of an object declared as a key. Due to performance reasons iteration though a dict implemented as iteration through it's keys.

Therefore we can use it to rid operation of obtaining a keys list.

Closure

A function defined inside another function is called a nested function. Nested functions can access variables of the enclosing scope.

The stats variable available through __closure__ attribute of the lambda function as a pointer to the value of the variable defined in the parent scope.

1
  • 1
    @I159: I am new to python. Can you please explain your answer in steps Mar 30, 2017 at 8:40
75

Example:

stats = {'a':1000, 'b':3000, 'c': 100}

if you wanna find the max value with its key, maybe follwing could be simple, without any relevant functions.

max(stats, key=stats.get)

the output is the key which has the max value.

1
  • this solution tested faster than max(stats, key=lambda key: stats[key])
    – Ta946
    Mar 9, 2019 at 6:08
53

Here is another one:

stats = {'a':1000, 'b':3000, 'c': 100}
max(stats.iterkeys(), key=lambda k: stats[k])

The function key simply returns the value that should be used for ranking and max() returns the demanded element right away.

3
  • 10
    .iterkeys is not needed in your answer (it's the default when iterating a dict). However, note that the .iteritems method fetches both key and value in one step, so there is no need for an extra getitem per key as needed with .iterkeys.
    – tzot
    Nov 6, 2008 at 13:07
  • This is a great answer because it is very clear what's going on and is thus easy to extend to other situations.
    – Leopd
    Apr 25, 2013 at 23:23
  • 4
    in python3 version: max(stats, key=lambda k: stats[k])
    – OfirD
    Feb 14, 2020 at 12:13
43
key, value = max(stats.iteritems(), key=lambda x:x[1])

If you don't care about value (I'd be surprised, but) you can do:

key, _ = max(stats.iteritems(), key=lambda x:x[1])

I like the tuple unpacking better than a [0] subscript at the end of the expression. I never like the readability of lambda expressions very much, but find this one better than the operator.itemgetter(1) IMHO.

0
36
max(stats, key=stats.get, default=None)

If stats could be an empty dictionary, using only max(stats, key=stats.get) will otherwise raise ValueError.

This answer is safe to use so long as None is not a possible key in the dictionary.

8
  • 1
    Any idea what the time complexity of this is?
    – RaGe
    Jun 11, 2021 at 21:01
  • 2
    @RaGe Time complexity is O(n)
    – Bhindi
    Jun 22, 2021 at 15:40
  • @Bhindi how did you know that time complexity of this is O(n)? Jun 16, 2022 at 9:22
  • 1
    @NaourassDerouichi: You can verify the time complexity of max() function from here - wiki.python.org/moin/TimeComplexity
    – Bhindi
    Jun 21, 2022 at 5:09
  • 1
    Edit your answer to use max(stats, key=stats.get, default=None) instead.
    – Asclepius
    Nov 12, 2022 at 17:10
35

Given that more than one entry my have the max value. I would make a list of the keys that have the max value as their value.

>>> stats = {'a':1000, 'b':3000, 'c': 100, 'd':3000}
>>> [key for m in [max(stats.values())] for key,val in stats.iteritems() if val == m]
['b', 'd']

This will give you 'b' and any other max key as well.

Note: For python 3 use stats.items() instead of stats.iteritems()

2
  • 9
    Your solution is OK but computes the maximum value as many times as there are items in the dict. If computing max were expensive (e.g., a LONG dictionary) I'd recommend [key for m in [max(stats.values())] for key,val in stats.iteritems() if val == m] if you want an one-liner, otherwise compute m = ... beforehand.
    – gboffi
    Dec 2, 2014 at 22:57
  • 4
    Just a short note: For python 3 use stats.items() instead of stats.iteritems().
    – Susa
    Aug 4, 2018 at 16:41
26

To get the maximum key/value of the dictionary stats:

stats = {'a':1000, 'b':3000, 'c': 100}
  • Based on keys

>>> max(stats.items(), key = lambda x: x[0]) ('c', 100)

  • Based on values

>>> max(stats.items(), key = lambda x: x[1]) ('b', 3000)

Of course, if you want to get only the key or value from the result, you can use tuple indexing. For Example, to get the key corresponding to the maximum value:

>>> max(stats.items(), key = lambda x: x[1])[0] 'b'

Explanation

The dictionary method items() in Python 3 returns a view object of the dictionary. When this view object is iterated over, by the max function, it yields the dictionary items as tuples of the form (key, value).

>>> list(stats.items()) [('c', 100), ('b', 3000), ('a', 1000)]

When you use the lambda expression lambda x: x[1], in each iteration, x is one of these tuples (key, value). So, by choosing the right index, you select whether you want to compare by keys or by values.

Python 2

For Python 2.2+ releases, the same code will work. However, it is better to use iteritems() dictionary method instead of items() for performance.

Notes

20
d = {'A': 4,'B':10}

min_v = min(zip(d.values(), d.keys()))
# min_v is (4,'A')

max_v = max(zip(d.values(), d.keys()))
# max_v is (10,'B')
0
16

I was not satisfied with any of these answers. max always picks the first key with the max value. The dictionary could have multiple keys with that value.

def keys_with_top_values(my_dict):
    return [key  for (key, value) in my_dict.items() if value == max(my_dict.values())]

Posting this answer in case it helps someone out. See the below SO post

Which maximum does Python pick in the case of a tie?

1
  • This solution returns all the keys with the max value. max(stats, key=stats.get) only returns the first key it finds. Jan 11, 2022 at 17:50
13

Per the iterated solutions via comments in the selected answer...

In Python 3:

max(stats.keys(), key=(lambda k: stats[k]))

In Python 2:

max(stats.iterkeys(), key=(lambda k: stats[k]))
2
  • Your solution for Python 3 also works for Python 2.7. May 28, 2015 at 15:43
  • 4
    because keys() does not return an iterator in python 2 and hence takes a performance hit
    – watsonic
    Jun 3, 2015 at 22:47
12

With collections.Counter you could do

>>> import collections
>>> stats = {'a':1000, 'b':3000, 'c': 100}
>>> stats = collections.Counter(stats)
>>> stats.most_common(1)
[('b', 3000)]

If appropriate, you could simply start with an empty collections.Counter and add to it

>>> stats = collections.Counter()
>>> stats['a'] += 1
:
etc. 
12

I got here looking for how to return mydict.keys() based on the value of mydict.values(). Instead of just the one key returned, I was looking to return the top x number of values.

This solution is simpler than using the max() function and you can easily change the number of values returned:

stats = {'a':1000, 'b':3000, 'c': 100}

x = sorted(stats, key=(lambda key:stats[key]), reverse=True)
['b', 'a', 'c']

If you want the single highest ranking key, just use the index:

x[0]
['b']

If you want the top two highest ranking keys, just use list slicing:

x[:2]
['b', 'a']
2
  • This is a very inefficient solution. Sorting the dict will incur a runtime of n log (n) because you're concerning yourself with a bunch of values that are not the maximum. Using the max function will incur a runtime of just n which is much faster. Aug 22, 2019 at 23:41
  • 1
    @PeterGraham pretty much every solution here (including the accepted answer) uses max(). It's clear it's the fastest. I thought I'd offer a different solution with the benefit of slicing, which was more useful to me at the time
    – ron_g
    Aug 27, 2019 at 9:52
11

Much simpler to understand approach:

mydict = { 'a':302, 'e':53, 'g':302, 'h':100 }
max_value_keys = [key for key in mydict.keys() if mydict[key] == max(mydict.values())]
print(max_value_keys) # prints a list of keys with max value

Output: ['a', 'g']

Now you can choose only one key:

maximum = mydict[max_value_keys[0]]
7

A heap queue is a generalised solution which allows you to extract the top n keys ordered by value:

from heapq import nlargest

stats = {'a':1000, 'b':3000, 'c': 100}

res1 = nlargest(1, stats, key=stats.__getitem__)  # ['b']
res2 = nlargest(2, stats, key=stats.__getitem__)  # ['b', 'a']

res1_val = next(iter(res1))                       # 'b'

Note dict.__getitem__ is the method called by the syntactic sugar dict[]. As opposed to dict.get, it will return KeyError if a key is not found, which here cannot occur.

5

max((value, key) for key, value in stats.items())[1]

1
  • 1
    This will order by the key with duplicate max values. That may or may not be desired.
    – Rob Rose
    Mar 29, 2018 at 21:15
5

Following are two easy ways to extract key with max value from given dict

import time
stats = {
   "a" : 1000,
   "b" : 3000,
   "c" : 90,
   "d" : 74,
   "e" : 72,
 }

start_time = time.time_ns()
max_key = max(stats, key = stats.get)
print("Max Key [", max_key, "]Time taken (ns)", time.time_ns() - start_time)

start_time = time.time_ns()
max_key = max(stats, key=lambda key: stats[key])
print("Max Key with Lambda[", max_key, "]Time taken (ns)", time.time_ns() - start_time)

Output

Max Key [ b ] Time taken (ns) 3100
Max Key with Lambda [ b ] Time taken (ns) 1782

Solution with Lambda expression seems to be performing better for smaller inputs.

4

For scientific python users, here is a simple solution using Pandas:

import pandas as pd
pd.Series({'a': 1000, 'b': 3000, 'c': 100}).idxmax()

>>> b
2
Counter = 0
for word in stats.keys():
    if stats[word]> counter:
        Counter = stats [word]
print Counter
2

I tested the accepted answer AND @thewolf's fastest solution against a very basic loop and the loop was faster than both:

import time
import operator


d = {"a"+str(i): i for i in range(1000000)}

def t1(dct):
    mx = float("-inf")
    key = None
    for k,v in dct.items():
        if v > mx:
            mx = v
            key = k
    return key

def t2(dct):
    v=list(dct.values())
    k=list(dct.keys())
    return k[v.index(max(v))]

def t3(dct):
    return max(dct.items(),key=operator.itemgetter(1))[0]

start = time.time()
for i in range(25):
    m = t1(d)
end = time.time()
print ("Iterating: "+str(end-start))

start = time.time()
for i in range(25):
    m = t2(d)
end = time.time()
print ("List creating: "+str(end-start))

start = time.time()
for i in range(25):
    m = t3(d)
end = time.time()
print ("Accepted answer: "+str(end-start))

results:

Iterating: 3.8201940059661865
List creating: 6.928712844848633
Accepted answer: 5.464320182800293
2

+1 to @Aric Coady's simplest solution.
And also one way to random select one of keys with max value in the dictionary:

stats = {'a':1000, 'b':3000, 'c': 100, 'd':3000}

import random
maxV = max(stats.values())
# Choice is one of the keys with max value
choice = random.choice([key for key, value in stats.items() if value == maxV])
2

In case of stats is empty, one can check a condition before finding valued key like,

stats = {'a':1000, 'b':3000, 'c': 100}
max_key = None
if bool(stats):
   max_key = max(stats, key=stats.get)
print(max_key)

This can first check if the dictionary is empty or not, then process.

>>> b
1

How about:

 max(zip(stats.keys(), stats.values()), key=lambda t : t[1])[0]
3
  • 3
    zip(stats.keys(), stats.values()) is just a longer way to write stats.items(). Once you make that change, your answer will be almost identical to several older answers.
    – vaultah
    Sep 4, 2017 at 20:38
  • Agreed, I wasnt aware that items() is same as zip Sep 5, 2017 at 2:13
  • items isn't the same as zip. It just produces the same result. Oct 25, 2017 at 0:06
1

In the case you have more than one key with the same value, for example:

stats = {'a':1000, 'b':3000, 'c': 100, 'd':3000, 'e':3000}

You could get a collection with all the keys with max value as follow:

from collections import defaultdict
from collections import OrderedDict

groupedByValue = defaultdict(list)
for key, value in sorted(stats.items()):
    groupedByValue[value].append(key)

# {1000: ['a'], 3000: ['b', 'd', 'e'], 100: ['c']}

groupedByValue[max(groupedByValue)]
# ['b', 'd', 'e']
1
1

Try this:

sorted(dict_name, key=dict_name.__getitem__, reverse=True)[0]
1

Just to add a situation where you want to select certain keys instead of all of them:

stats = {'a':1000, 'b':3000, 'c': 100, 'd':3000, 'e':3000}
keys_to_search = ["a", "b", "c"]

max([k for k in keys_to_search], key=lambda x: stats[x])```

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.