11

is there a 24Bit primitive integral datatype in C++?

If there is none, would it be possible to create a class int24 (, uint24 ) ?

it's purpose could be:
* manipulating soundfiles in 24 bit format
* manipulating bitmapdata without alphachannel

many thanks in advance

Oops

14

I wrote this to help me with audio manipulation. Its not the fastest but it works for me :)

const int INT24_MAX = 8388607;

class Int24
{
protected:
    unsigned char m_Internal[3];
public:
    Int24()
    {
    }

    Int24( const int val )
    {
        *this   = val;
    }

    Int24( const Int24& val )
    {
        *this   = val;
    }

    operator int() const
    {
        if ( m_Internal[2] & 0x80 ) // Is this a negative?  Then we need to siingn extend.
        {
            return (0xff << 24) | (m_Internal[2] << 16) | (m_Internal[1] << 8) | (m_Internal[0] << 0);
        }
        else
        {
            return (m_Internal[2] << 16) | (m_Internal[1] << 8) | (m_Internal[0] << 0);
        }
    }

    operator float() const
    {
        return (float)this->operator int();
    }

    Int24& operator =( const Int24& input )
    {
        m_Internal[0]   = input.m_Internal[0];
        m_Internal[1]   = input.m_Internal[1];
        m_Internal[2]   = input.m_Internal[2];

        return *this;
    }

    Int24& operator =( const int input )
    {
        m_Internal[0]   = ((unsigned char*)&input)[0];
        m_Internal[1]   = ((unsigned char*)&input)[1];
        m_Internal[2]   = ((unsigned char*)&input)[2];

        return *this;
    }

    /***********************************************/

    Int24 operator +( const Int24& val ) const
    {
        return Int24( (int)*this + (int)val );
    }

    Int24 operator -( const Int24& val ) const
    {
        return Int24( (int)*this - (int)val );
    }

    Int24 operator *( const Int24& val ) const
    {
        return Int24( (int)*this * (int)val );
    }

    Int24 operator /( const Int24& val ) const
    {
        return Int24( (int)*this / (int)val );
    }

    /***********************************************/

    Int24 operator +( const int val ) const
    {
        return Int24( (int)*this + val );
    }

    Int24 operator -( const int val ) const
    {
        return Int24( (int)*this - val );
    }

    Int24 operator *( const int val ) const
    {
        return Int24( (int)*this * val );
    }

    Int24 operator /( const int val ) const
    {
        return Int24( (int)*this / val );
    }

    /***********************************************/
    /***********************************************/


    Int24& operator +=( const Int24& val )
    {
        *this   = *this + val;
        return *this;
    }

    Int24& operator -=( const Int24& val )
    {
        *this   = *this - val;
        return *this;
    }

    Int24& operator *=( const Int24& val )
    {
        *this   = *this * val;
        return *this;
    }

    Int24& operator /=( const Int24& val )
    {
        *this   = *this / val;
        return *this;
    }

    /***********************************************/

    Int24& operator +=( const int val )
    {
        *this   = *this + val;
        return *this;
    }

    Int24& operator -=( const int val )
    {
        *this   = *this - val;
        return *this;
    }

    Int24& operator *=( const int val )
    {
        *this   = *this * val;
        return *this;
    }

    Int24& operator /=( const int val )
    {
        *this   = *this / val;
        return *this;
    }

    /***********************************************/
    /***********************************************/

    Int24 operator >>( const int val ) const
    {
        return Int24( (int)*this >> val );
    }

    Int24 operator <<( const int val ) const
    {
        return Int24( (int)*this << val );
    }

    /***********************************************/

    Int24& operator >>=( const int val )
    {
        *this = *this >> val;
        return *this;
    }

    Int24& operator <<=( const int val )
    {
        *this = *this << val;
        return *this;
    }

    /***********************************************/
    /***********************************************/

    operator bool() const
    {
        return (int)*this != 0;
    }

    bool operator !() const
    {
        return !((int)*this);
    }

    Int24 operator -()
    {
        return Int24( -(int)*this );
    }

    /***********************************************/
    /***********************************************/

    bool operator ==( const Int24& val ) const
    {
        return (int)*this == (int)val;
    }

    bool operator !=( const Int24& val ) const
    {
        return (int)*this != (int)val;
    }

    bool operator >=( const Int24& val ) const
    {
        return (int)*this >= (int)val;
    }

    bool operator <=( const Int24& val ) const
    {
        return (int)*this <= (int)val;
    }

    bool operator >( const Int24& val ) const
    {
        return (int)*this > (int)val;
    }

    bool operator <( const Int24& val ) const
    {
        return (int)*this < (int)val;
    }

    /***********************************************/

    bool operator ==( const int val ) const
    {
        return (int)*this == val;
    }

    bool operator !=( const int val ) const
    {
        return (int)*this != val;
    }

    bool operator >=( const int val ) const
    {
        return (int)*this >= val;
    }

    bool operator <=( const int val ) const
    {
        return (int)*this <= val;
    }

    bool operator >( const int val ) const
    {
        return ((int)*this) > val;
    }

    bool operator <( const int val ) const
    {
        return (int)*this < val;
    }

    /***********************************************/
    /***********************************************/
};
  • this looks very nice, thanks. you have also bit shifting operators, great stuff! 1 question: how to use the class to store the data in a, or to read from a stream? would it be possible to use the << and >> operator too? – OlimilOops Apr 21 '10 at 12:33
  • @Oops: I think not, since there are two possible implicit casts of Int24 - to int and to float, and the compiler has no way of choosing which cast to perform, and then use the result with ostream::operator<<. But you can easily add operators << and >> for ostreams and istreams yourself... – conio Apr 21 '10 at 13:23
  • 1
    @MichaelDorgan: Yeah it is designed for little endian but thats pretty much standard in the wave files I use it with. I'm pretty sure those casts won't fail though because of alignment or otherwise ... Check out my operator int() implementation :) – Goz Apr 22 '13 at 21:41
  • 1
    Most of the operators here are unnecessary. Removing some of them makes more code "just magically work". Also, the the endian bias removed: coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/54aa37188d37a23d ( – Mooing Duck Feb 10 '14 at 19:29
  • 1
    @Goz: I'd put in special logic that if the 32bit value is negative, then the stored 24bit value is also negative, always. INT24_MIN is 0xff800000. Ergo, INT24_MIN-1 is 0xff7fffff, which is stored as 0x7fffff, and then the "negative" bit is set. Then it's -xFFFFFF, which is -1. Since I didn't do that for positives, and it's counterintuitive, I've removed it: coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/eac40bbbb3898348 – Mooing Duck Feb 10 '14 at 20:54
18

Depending on the requirements I'd use a bitfield for it.

struct int24{
    unsigned int data : 24;
};

Or, if a separation is easier, just use 3 bytes (chars).

Btw, both use cases you mention in the question generally use 32bit integers. In the case of audio processing you'll generally convert to 32 bit ints (or floats, preferably, to prevent overflow situations you'd get with fixed point or integer math) when loading in chunks of audio because you're not going to have the entire file in memory at once.

For image data, people just tend to use 32 bit integers and ignore the alpha 8 alpha bits all together, or if you're dealing with a tightly packed format you're probably better of just manipulating them as char-pointers anyway because you'll have all channels separate. It's going to be a performance/memory trade-off anyway because writing one int is generally faster than three chars separately; however it will take 25% more memory.

Packing structs like this is compiler specific. However, in Visual Studio you'd do the following to make the struct exactly 24 bits.

#pragma pack(push, 1)
struct int24{
    unsigned int data : 24;
};
#pragma pack(pop)
  • 4
    it would be still padded to 32bits in most cases. – nothrow Apr 21 '10 at 12:31
  • 1
    Most compilers allow you to turn off the padding to enable these tightly packed formats. – Jasper Bekkers Apr 21 '10 at 12:50
  • could you explain how to "turn off padding" / "create a packed struct" ? maybe you could modify your code – OlimilOops Apr 21 '10 at 17:10
  • @Oops I updated the answer with the correct code sample for Visual Studio, however your compiler might do this differently. – Jasper Bekkers Apr 21 '10 at 18:37
  • @JasperBekkers - Need a semi-colon on the second code block's struct. I wouldn't let me edit it since it was < 6 characters. – Qix Aug 21 '12 at 0:26
6

Working with anything smaller than an integer (32 or 64 bit depending on your architecture) is not ideal. All CPU operations of the smaller data types (short, etc) are done using integer arithmetic. Conversion to and from the CPU has to be done, slowing your application down (even if it is just a tad).

My advice: Store them as 32 (or 64 bit) integers to improve your overall speed. When it comes time to do I/O, then you'll have to do the conversion yourself.

As far as manipulating audio data, there are many libraries available that take care of the I/O for you - unless you want to start learning how PCM, etc are stored - as well as other DSP functions. I would suggest using one of the many libraries out there.

  • This should be the accepted answer. Not because we have the same name or anything. – NicoBerrogorry May 14 '18 at 18:25
0

No - all you can really do is:

typedef int32_t int24_t;

which helps to make code/intent more readable/obvious, but doesn't impose any limits on range or storage space.

  • thanks for your post. But wouldn't it be very memory comsumable when reading a huge file? because 24bit raw audio is very huge at all. – OlimilOops Apr 21 '10 at 12:36
  • 1
    @Oops: you probably want to unpack your 24 bit data to 32 bit when yo read it, otherwise you will need to pack/unpack samples on misaligned boundaries on-the-fly. The only reason to keep the data in its packed form would be if you were really pushed for memory. – Paul R Apr 21 '10 at 16:14
  • The best reason for leaving the sounddata packed as it is, is just playing the sound, isn't it? – OlimilOops Apr 21 '10 at 20:48
  • @Oops: it depends on what API you are using for sound playback and what formats it supports. If all you want to do is play the sound then keep it packed. If you want to do any processing of the sound data then it's probably going to be easier and more efficient if it's unpacked. – Paul R Apr 21 '10 at 21:01
  • 2
    I think typedefs like that can misdirect someone who will work with your code after you and don't know that int24_t actually is longer than mentioned in its name. So someone can write code which rely rather on type name than its real size: memcpy(dst, int24_array, 24*numElements); (correct variant is memcpy(dst, int24_array, sizeof(int24_t)*numElements); for those who are interested) – Roman Kruglov Sep 30 '11 at 8:53

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.