126

I would like to clamp a value x to a range [a, b]:

x = (x < a) ? a : ((x > b) ? b : x);

This is quite basic. But I do not see a function "clamp" in the class library - at least not in System.Math.

(For the unaware to "clamp" a value is to make sure that it lies between some maximum and minimum values. If it’s greater than the max value, then it’s replaced by the max, etc.)

10

11 Answers 11

176

You could write an extension method:

public static T Clamp<T>(this T val, T min, T max) where T : IComparable<T>
{
    if (val.CompareTo(min) < 0) return min;
    else if(val.CompareTo(max) > 0) return max;
    else return val;
}

Extension methods go in static classes - since this is quite a low-level function, it should probably go in some core namespace in your project. You can then use the method in any code file that contains a using directive for the namespace e.g.

using Core.ExtensionMethods

int i = 4.Clamp(1, 3);

.NET Core 2.0

Starting with .NET Core 2.0 System.Math now has a Clamp method that can be used instead:

using System;

int i = Math.Clamp(4, 1, 3);
13
  • 1
    Where would I put this and is calling CompareTo slower than comparing with < (for integral types)?
    – Danvil
    Apr 21, 2010 at 13:55
  • 1
    In a static class, and in the .NET framework (not sure about mono, compact, etc.), the generic should be recompiled for the type, and CompareTo inlined, so no performance penalty. Apr 21, 2010 at 14:01
  • 1
    @Frasier Unless this is ultra performance sensitive code, you are unlikely to be making any meaningful performance gains by doing so. Having it be generic is probably more useful than saving a few microseconds.
    – MgSam
    Jun 6, 2013 at 4:36
  • 6
    The good thing about constraining to the generic version of IComparable is that no boxing occurs. This ought to run very fast. Remember that with double and float, the CompareTo method corresponds to a total order where NaN is less than all other values, including NegativeInfinity. So it is not equivalent to the < operator. If you used < with a floating-point type, you would have to consider how to treat NaN also. This is not relevant for other numeric types. Aug 7, 2013 at 20:05
  • 1
    You would need to consider how to treat NaN in either case. The version with < and > would output NaN and using NaN for min or max would effectively make a one-sided clamp. With CompareTo it would always return NaN if max is NaN.
    – Herman
    Mar 18, 2014 at 10:12
38

Just use Math.Min and Math.Max:

x = Math.Min(Math.Max(x, a), b);
4
  • That translates to int a0 = x > a ? x : a; return a0 < b ? a0 : b which (although gives correct results) isn't exactly ideal.
    – Mr. Smith
    Apr 24, 2014 at 3:25
  • 4
    @d7samurai If we know that min <= max, Math.Min(Math.Max(x, min), max) results in one more comparison than necessary if x < min.
    – Jim Balter
    Sep 15, 2015 at 5:58
  • @JimBalter, in theory this is true. If you look at how CompareTo() is typically implemented, the accepted answer can take upto 6 comparisons. I don't know though, if the compiler is smart enough and inlines the CompareTo() and removes the superfluous comparisons.
    – quinmars
    Sep 6, 2016 at 21:41
  • 2
    This is good for cases when you only need to do it once, then whole new function for that feels like an overkill.
    – feos
    Nov 30, 2017 at 16:51
25

Try:

public static int Clamp(int value, int min, int max)  
{  
    return (value < min) ? min : (value > max) ? max : value;  
}
3
  • 10
    Ugh! Those ugly redundant parenthesis! If you're going to be an evil genius with the double ternary operators, at least do it properly and get rid of those as well! 😂 Oct 1, 2017 at 8:07
  • 20
    @XenoRo Those "redundant" parenthesis are what makes it readable.
    – Clearer
    May 11, 2018 at 7:46
  • 3
    @Cleaner - 1) If you're going for readability, double ternaries would be avoided and IF blocks would be used instead. 2) You don't get the joke, do you? xD May 11, 2018 at 20:55
13

There isn't one, but it's not too hard to make one. I found one here: clamp

It is:

public static T Clamp<T>(T value, T max, T min)
    where T : System.IComparable<T> {
        T result = value;
        if (value.CompareTo(max) > 0)
            result = max;
        if (value.CompareTo(min) < 0)
            result = min;
        return result;
    }

And it can be used like:

int i = Clamp(12, 10, 0); -> i == 10
double d = Clamp(4.5, 10.0, 0.0); -> d == 4.5
3
  • This solution is better than the accepted one. No ambiguity.
    – aggsol
    Jan 16, 2015 at 10:06
  • 6
    @CodeClown This solution results in an unnecessary comparison when value > max, and the inverted argument order invites (and virtually guarantees) bugs. I don't know what ambiguity you think is avoided.
    – Jim Balter
    Sep 15, 2015 at 6:05
  • For consistency with the legacy Math.Clamp implementation, recommend switching the order of the min/max parameters: Clamp(T value, T min, T max)
    – josh poley
    Feb 14, 2020 at 23:33
10

There isn't one in the System.Math namespace.

There is a MathHelper Class where it is available for the XNA game studio if that happens to be what you are doing:

1
5

System.Math.Clamp is the method you want if you are on .NET 5+, .NET Core 3.x, or .NET Core 2.x.

var a = Math.Clamp(5, 1, 10); // = 5
var b = Math.Clamp(-99, 1, 10); // = 1
var c = Math.Clamp(99, 1, 10); // = 10
4

Just sharing Lee's solution with the comments' issues and concerns addressed, where possible:

public static T Clamped<T>(this T value, T min, T max) where T : IComparable<T> {
    if (value == null) throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(value), "is null.");
    if (min == null) throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(min), "is null.");
    if (max == null) throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(max), "is null.");
    //If min <= max, clamp
    if (min.CompareTo(max) <= 0) return value.CompareTo(min) < 0 ? min : value.CompareTo(max) > 0 ? max : value;
    //If min > max, clamp on swapped min and max
    return value.CompareTo(max) < 0 ? max : value.CompareTo(min) > 0 ? min : value;
}

Differences:

Limitations: No one-sided clamps. If max is NaN, always returns NaN (See Herman's comment).

1
  • Another limitation is nameof does not work for C# 5 or below.
    – RoLYroLLs
    Jul 24, 2018 at 20:54
0

Using the previous answers, I condensed it down to the below code for my needs. This will also allow you to clamp a number only by its min or max.

public static class IComparableExtensions
{
    public static T Clamped<T>(this T value, T min, T max) 
        where T : IComparable<T>
    {
        return value.CompareTo(min) < 0 ? min : value.ClampedMaximum(max);
    }

    public static T ClampedMinimum<T>(this T value, T min)
        where T : IComparable<T>
    {
        return value.CompareTo(min) < 0 ? min : value;
    }

    public static T ClampedMaximum<T>(this T value, T max)
        where T : IComparable<T>
    {
        return value.CompareTo(max) > 0 ? max : value;
    }
}
1
  • Why not return value.ClampedMinimum(min).ClampedMaximum(max);?
    – Henrik
    Jan 16, 2019 at 14:42
0

The below code supports specifying bounds in any order (i.e. bound1 <= bound2, or bound2 <= bound1). I've found this useful for clamping values calculated from linear equations (y=mx+b) where the slope of the line can be increasing or decreasing.

I know: The code consists of five super-ugly conditional expression operators. The thing is, it works, and the tests below prove it. Feel free to add strictly unnecessary parentheses if you so desire.

You can easily create other overloads for other numeric types and basically copy/paste the tests.

Warning: Comparing floating point numbers is not simple. This code does not implement double comparisons robustly. Use a floating point comparison library to replace the uses of comparison operators.

public static class MathExtensions
{
    public static double Clamp(this double value, double bound1, double bound2)
    {
        return bound1 <= bound2 ? value <= bound1 ? bound1 : value >= bound2 ? bound2 : value : value <= bound2 ? bound2 : value >= bound1 ? bound1 : value;
    }
}

xUnit/FluentAssertions tests:

public class MathExtensionsTests
{
    [Theory]
    [InlineData(0, 0, 0, 0)]
    [InlineData(0, 0, 2, 0)]
    [InlineData(-1, 0, 2, 0)]
    [InlineData(1, 0, 2, 1)]
    [InlineData(2, 0, 2, 2)]
    [InlineData(3, 0, 2, 2)]
    [InlineData(0, 2, 0, 0)]
    [InlineData(-1, 2, 0, 0)]
    [InlineData(1, 2, 0, 1)]
    [InlineData(2, 2, 0, 2)]
    [InlineData(3, 2, 0, 2)]
    public void MustClamp(double value, double bound1, double bound2, double expectedValue)
    {
        value.Clamp(bound1, bound2).Should().Be(expectedValue);
    }
}
0

If I want to validate the range of an argument in [min, max], the I use the following handy class:

public class RangeLimit<T> where T : IComparable<T>
{
    public T Min { get; }
    public T Max { get; }
    public RangeLimit(T min, T max)
    {
        if (min.CompareTo(max) > 0)
            throw new InvalidOperationException("invalid range");
        Min = min;
        Max = max;
    }

    public void Validate(T param)
    {
        if (param.CompareTo(Min) < 0 || param.CompareTo(Max) > 0)
            throw new InvalidOperationException("invalid argument");
    }

    public T Clamp(T param) => param.CompareTo(Min) < 0 ? Min : param.CompareTo(Max) > 0 ? Max : param;
}

The class works for all object which are IComparable. I create an instance with a certain range:

RangeLimit<int> range = new RangeLimit<int>(0, 100);

I an either validate an argument

range.Validate(value);

or clamp the argument to the range:

var v = range.Validate(value);
0

Based on the @JeremyB answer, with suggested corrections.

namespace App
{
  /// <summary>
  /// Miscellaneous utilities.
  /// </summary>
  public static class Util
  {
    /// <summary>
    /// Clamp a value to the inclusive range [min, max].
    /// </summary>
    /// <remarks>
    /// In newer versions of the .NET Framework, there is a System.Math.Clamp() method. 
    /// </remarks>
    /// <typeparam name="T">The type of value.</typeparam>
    /// <param name="value">The value to clamp.</param>
    /// <param name="min">The minimum value.</param>
    /// <param name="max">The maximum value.</param>
    /// <returns>The clamped value.</returns>
    public static T clamp<T>( T value, T min, T max ) where T : System.IComparable<T>
    {
      if ( value.CompareTo( max ) > 0 )
      {
        return max;
      }

      if ( value.CompareTo( min ) < 0 )
      {
        return min;
      }

      return value;
    }
  }
}

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