76

In MSDN I found CloseReason.UserClosing to know that the user had decided to close the form but I guess it is the same for both clicking the X button or clicking the close button. So how can I differentiate between these two in my code?

Thanks all.

79

Assuming you're asking for WinForms, you may use the FormClosing() event. The event FormClosing() is triggered any time a form is to get closed.

To detect if the user clicked either X or your CloseButton, you may get it through the sender object. Try to cast sender as a Button control, and verify perhaps for its name "CloseButton", for instance.

private void Form1_FormClosing(object sender, FormClosingEventArgs e) {
    if (string.Equals((sender as Button).Name, @"CloseButton"))
        // Do something proper to CloseButton.
    else
        // Then assume that X has been clicked and act accordingly.
}

Otherwise, I have never ever needed to differentiate whether X or CloseButton was clicked, as I wanted to perform something specific on the FormClosing event, like closing all MdiChildren before closing the MDIContainerForm, or event checking for unsaved changes. Under these circumstances, we don't need, according to me, to differentiate from either buttons.

Closing by ALT+F4 will also trigger the FormClosing() event, as it sends a message to the Form that says to close. You may cancel the event by setting the

FormClosingEventArgs.Cancel = true. 

In our example, this would translate to be

e.Cancel = true.

Notice the difference between the FormClosing() and the FormClosed() events.

FormClosing occurs when the form received the message to be closed, and verify whether it has something to do before it is closed.

FormClosed occurs when the form is actually closed, so after it is closed.

Does this help?

  • Yes, thanks for the "Cast" idea, had used this technique with Delphi 7 but forgot to do the same in C# – Bohn Apr 21 '10 at 14:44
  • This in fact is a port from Delphi to .NET. =) I'm glad I helped! – Will Marcouiller Apr 21 '10 at 17:44
  • I get 'Object reference not set to an instance of an object' when I use this code. – Nate S. Apr 20 '15 at 13:57
  • 21
    This is wrong. You can't cast sender to button because it's the form itself. This throws exception. – Xtro May 6 '15 at 17:27
  • i am getting button cast exception when i cast my sender into button type reference variable, it says that cannot cast into button of form type sender. – theburningfire Oct 30 '18 at 7:22
72

The CloseReason enumeration you found on MSDN is just for the purpose of checking whether the user closed the app, or it was due to a shutdown, or closed by the task manager, etc...

You can do different actions, according to the reason, like:

void Form_FormClosing(object sender, FormClosingEventArgs e)
{
    if(e.CloseReason == CloseReason.UserClosing)
        // Prompt user to save his data

    if(e.CloseReason == CloseReason.WindowsShutDown)
        // Autosave and clear up ressources
}

But like you guessed, there is no difference between clicking the x button, or rightclicking the taskbar and clicking 'close', or pressing Alt F4, etc. It all ends up in a CloseReason.UserClosing reason.

  • 9
    Using the standard Close(); seems to trigger CloseReason.UserClosing for me. Not sure why. – Dan W Mar 2 '13 at 16:44
  • I found this useful when trying to block the closing of an MDI child form by user action on the form but not when the parent is being closed. – Steve Pettifer Sep 16 '14 at 10:46
  • 1
    This doesn't answer the question, only enumerate further the issue. – Robert Koernke Sep 20 '17 at 17:19
38

The "X" button registers as DialogResult.Cancel so another option is to evaluate the DialogResult.

If you have multiple buttons on your form, you're probably already associating different DialogResults to each and this will provide you with the means to tell the difference between each button.

(Example: btnSubmit.DialogResult = DialogResult.OK, btnClose.DialogResult = Dialogresult.Abort)

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        this.FormClosing += Form1_FormClosing;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Override the Close Form event
    /// Do something
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="sender"></param>
    /// <param name="e"></param>
    private void Form1_FormClosing(Object sender, FormClosingEventArgs e)
    {
        //In case windows is trying to shut down, don't hold the process up
        if (e.CloseReason == CloseReason.WindowsShutDown) return;

        if (this.DialogResult == DialogResult.Cancel)
        {
            // Assume that X has been clicked and act accordingly.
            // Confirm user wants to close
            switch (MessageBox.Show(this, "Are you sure?", "Do you still want ... ?", MessageBoxButtons.YesNo, MessageBoxIcon.Question))
            {
                //Stay on this form
                case DialogResult.No:
                    e.Cancel = true;
                    break;
                default:
                    break;
            }
        }
    }
  • In my case this is more useful than the accepted answer. Since the 'X' is assigned DialogResult.Cancel, assigning some other value to the cancel button easily distinguish them and handle things appropriately. – mickeyf Feb 7 '13 at 16:59
  • 3
    This doesn't work in my case. When press 'X', DialogResult remains None. What could be the problem? – Bhaskar Mar 17 '15 at 12:17
  • 1
    @Bhaskar, when you instantiate your dialog, make sure to set the appropriate DialogResult to each button in your dialog. I had provided an example above but did not create a code block to show the Dialog declaration. – AlexScript Apr 10 '17 at 16:51
6

It determines when to close the application if a form is closed (if your application is not attached to a specific form).

    private void MyForm_FormClosed(object sender, FormClosedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (Application.OpenForms.Count == 0) Application.Exit();
    }
3

I always use a Form Close method in my applications that catches alt + x from my exit Button, alt + f4 or another form closing event was initiated. All my classes have the class name defined as Private string mstrClsTitle = "grmRexcel" in this case, an Exit method that calls the Form Closing Method and a Form Closing Method. I also have a statement for the Form Closing Method - this.FormClosing = My Form Closing Form Closing method name.

The code for this:

namespace Rexcel_II
{
    public partial class frmRexcel : Form
    {
        private string mstrClsTitle = "frmRexcel";

        public frmRexcel()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

            this.FormClosing += frmRexcel_FormClosing;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Handles the Button Exit Event executed by the Exit Button Click
        /// or Alt + x
        /// 
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="sender"></param>
        /// <param name="e"></param>
        private void btnExit_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {            
            this.Close();        
        }


        /// <summary>
        /// Handles the Form Closing event
        /// 
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="sender"></param>
        /// <param name="e"></param>
        private void frmRexcel_FormClosing(object sender, FormClosingEventArgs e)
        {

            // ---- If windows is shutting down, 
            // ---- I don't want to hold up the process
            if (e.CloseReason == CloseReason.WindowsShutDown) return;
            {

                // ---- Ok, Windows is not shutting down so
                // ---- either btnExit or Alt + x or Alt + f4 has been clicked or
                // ---- another form closing event was intiated
                //      *)  Confirm user wants to close the application
                switch (MessageBox.Show(this, 
                                    "Are you sure you want to close the Application?",
                                    mstrClsTitle + ".frmRexcel_FormClosing",
                                    MessageBoxButtons.YesNo, MessageBoxIcon.Question))
                {

                    // ---- *)  if No keep the application alive 
                    //----  *)  else close the application
                    case DialogResult.No:
                        e.Cancel = true;
                        break;
                    default:
                        break;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
2

You can try adding event handler from design like this: Open form in design view, open properties window or press F4, click event toolbar button to view events on Form object, find FormClosing event in Behavior group, and double click it. Reference: https://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/vstudio/en-US/9bdee708-db4b-4e46-a99c-99726fa25cfb/how-do-i-add-formclosing-event?forum=csharpgeneral

1
if (this.DialogResult == DialogResult.Cancel)
        {

        }
        else
        {
            switch (e.CloseReason)
            {
                case CloseReason.UserClosing:
                    e.Cancel = true;
                    break;
            }
        }

if condition will execute when user clicks 'X' or close button on form. The else can be used when user clicks Alt+f4 for any other purpose

0
namespace Test
{
    public partial class Member : Form
    {
        public Member()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private bool xClicked = true;

        private void btnClose_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            xClicked = false;
            Close();
        }

        private void Member_FormClosing(object sender, FormClosingEventArgs e)
        {
            if (xClicked)
            {
                // user click the X
            } 
            else 
            {
                // user click the close button
            }
        }
    }
}

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