683

Consider a method signature like:

public String myFunction(String abc);

Can Mockito help return the same string that the method received?

  • Ok, how about any java mocking framework in general... Is this possible with any other framework, or should I just create a dumb stub to mimic the behavior I want? – Abhijeet Kashnia Apr 22 '10 at 13:18

10 Answers 10

1008
1

You can create an Answer in Mockito. Let's assume, we have an interface named Application with a method myFunction.

public interface Application {
  public String myFunction(String abc);
}

Here is the test method with a Mockito answer:

public void testMyFunction() throws Exception {
  Application mock = mock(Application.class);
  when(mock.myFunction(anyString())).thenAnswer(new Answer<String>() {
    @Override
    public String answer(InvocationOnMock invocation) throws Throwable {
      Object[] args = invocation.getArguments();
      return (String) args[0];
    }
  });

  assertEquals("someString",mock.myFunction("someString"));
  assertEquals("anotherString",mock.myFunction("anotherString"));
}

Since Mockito 1.9.5 and Java 8, you can also use a lambda expression:

when(myMock.myFunction(anyString())).thenAnswer(i -> i.getArguments()[0]);
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This is what I was looking for, too. Thank you! My problem was different, though. I want to mock a persistence service (EJB) that stores objects and returns them by name. – migu Jul 19 '11 at 10:56
  • 7
    I created an extra class that wraps the creation of the answer. So the code reads like when(...).then(Return.firstParameter()) – SpaceTrucker Sep 26 '12 at 14:50
  • 72
    With Java 8 lambdas it's supper easy to return first argument, even for specific class, i.e. when(foo(any()).then(i -> i.getArgumentAt(0, Bar.class)). And you can just as well use a method reference and call real method. – Paweł Dyda Jan 29 '15 at 13:17
  • This solves my problem with a method the returns Iterator<? extends ClassName> which causes all kinds of cast problems in a thenReturn() statement. – Michael Shopsin Mar 20 '15 at 15:56
  • 16
    With Java 8 and Mockito < 1.9.5 then Paweł's answer becomes when(foo(any()).thenAnswer(i -> i.getArguments()[0]) – Graeme Moss Aug 31 '15 at 8:50
576
1

If you have Mockito 1.9.5 or higher, there is a new static method that can make the Answer object for you. You need to write something like

import static org.mockito.Mockito.when;
import static org.mockito.AdditionalAnswers.returnsFirstArg;

when(myMock.myFunction(anyString())).then(returnsFirstArg());

or alternatively

doAnswer(returnsFirstArg()).when(myMock).myFunction(anyString());

Note that the returnsFirstArg() method is static in the AdditionalAnswers class, which is new to Mockito 1.9.5; so you'll need the right static import.

| improve this answer | |
  • 18
    Note: it's when(...).then(returnsFirstArg()), I mistakenly had when(...).thenReturn(returnsFirstArg()) which gave java.lang.ClassCastException: org.mockito.internal.stubbing.answers.ReturnsArgumentAt cannot be cast to – Benedikt Köppel Mar 11 '15 at 13:14
  • 1
    Note: returnsFirstArg() returns Answer<> rather than the value of the argument. Got 'Foo(java.lang.String) cannot be applied to '(org.mockito.stubbing.Answer<java.lang.Object>)' while trying to call .thenReturn(new Foo(returnsFirstArg())) – Lu55 May 18 '15 at 10:14
  • I always need to google this answer again and again and again for the past years, as I just can't remember "AdditionalAnswers" and I just need it very rarely. Then I wonder how the heck I can built up that scenario as I can't find the necessary dependencies. Couldn't this just be added directly to mockito? :/ – BAERUS Jun 6 '16 at 13:43
  • 2
    Steve's answer is more generic. This one only allows you to return the raw argument. If you want to process that argument and return the result, then Steve's answer rules. I upvoted both as they are both useful. – akostadinov Dec 6 '17 at 13:34
  • FYI, we have to import static org.mockito.AdditionalAnswers.returnsFirstArg. this to use returnsFirstArg. Also, I can do when(myMock.myFunction(any())).then(returnsFirstArg()) in Mockito 2.20.* – gtiwari333 Jul 30 '18 at 19:08
79
0

With Java 8 it is possible to create a one-line answer even with older version of Mockito:

when(myMock.myFunction(anyString()).then(i -> i.getArgumentAt(0, String.class));

Of course this is not as useful as using AdditionalAnswers suggested by David Wallace, but might be useful if you want to transform argument "on the fly".

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Brilliant. Thank you. If the argument is long, can this still work with boxing and Long.class ? – vikingsteve Feb 1 '16 at 9:22
  • 1
    .getArgumentAt(..) was not found for me but .getArgument(1) worked (mockito 2.6.2) – Curtis Yallop Oct 5 '18 at 19:26
41
0

I had a very similar problem. The goal was to mock a service that persists Objects and can return them by their name. The service looks like this:

public class RoomService {
    public Room findByName(String roomName) {...}
    public void persist(Room room) {...}
}

The service mock uses a map to store the Room instances.

RoomService roomService = mock(RoomService.class);
final Map<String, Room> roomMap = new HashMap<String, Room>();

// mock for method persist
doAnswer(new Answer<Void>() {
    @Override
    public Void answer(InvocationOnMock invocation) throws Throwable {
        Object[] arguments = invocation.getArguments();
        if (arguments != null && arguments.length > 0 && arguments[0] != null) {
            Room room = (Room) arguments[0];
            roomMap.put(room.getName(), room);
        }
        return null;
    }
}).when(roomService).persist(any(Room.class));

// mock for method findByName
when(roomService.findByName(anyString())).thenAnswer(new Answer<Room>() {
    @Override
    public Room answer(InvocationOnMock invocation) throws Throwable {
        Object[] arguments = invocation.getArguments();
        if (arguments != null && arguments.length > 0 && arguments[0] != null) {
            String key = (String) arguments[0];
            if (roomMap.containsKey(key)) {
                return roomMap.get(key);
            }
        }
        return null;
    }
});

We can now run our tests on this mock. For example:

String name = "room";
Room room = new Room(name);
roomService.persist(room);
assertThat(roomService.findByName(name), equalTo(room));
assertNull(roomService.findByName("none"));
| improve this answer | |
34
0

With Java 8, Steve's answer can become

public void testMyFunction() throws Exception {
    Application mock = mock(Application.class);
    when(mock.myFunction(anyString())).thenAnswer(
    invocation -> {
        Object[] args = invocation.getArguments();
        return args[0];
    });

    assertEquals("someString", mock.myFunction("someString"));
    assertEquals("anotherString", mock.myFunction("anotherString"));
}

EDIT: Even shorter:

public void testMyFunction() throws Exception {
    Application mock = mock(Application.class);
    when(mock.myFunction(anyString())).thenAnswer(
        invocation -> invocation.getArgument(0));

    assertEquals("someString", mock.myFunction("someString"));
    assertEquals("anotherString", mock.myFunction("anotherString"));
}
| improve this answer | |
6
0

This is a pretty old question but i think still relevant. Also the accepted answer works only for String. Meanwhile there is Mockito 2.1 and some imports have changed, so i would like to share my current answer:

import static org.mockito.AdditionalAnswers.returnsFirstArg;
import static org.mockito.ArgumentMatchers.any;
import static org.mockito.Mockito.when;

@Mock
private MyClass myClass;

// this will return anything you pass, but it's pretty unrealistic
when(myClass.myFunction(any())).then(returnsFirstArg());
// it is more "life-like" to accept only the right type
when(myClass.myFunction(any(ClassOfArgument.class))).then(returnsFirstArg());

The myClass.myFunction would look like:

public class MyClass {
    public ClassOfArgument myFunction(ClassOfArgument argument){
        return argument;
    }  
}
| improve this answer | |
4
0

I use something similar (basically it's the same approach). Sometimes it's useful to have a mock object return pre-defined output for certain inputs. That goes like this:

private Hashtable<InputObject,  OutputObject> table = new Hashtable<InputObject, OutputObject>();
table.put(input1, ouput1);
table.put(input2, ouput2);

...

when(mockObject.method(any(InputObject.class))).thenAnswer(
       new Answer<OutputObject>()
       {
           @Override
           public OutputObject answer(final InvocationOnMock invocation) throws Throwable
           {
               InputObject input = (InputObject) invocation.getArguments()[0];
               if (table.containsKey(input))
               {
                   return table.get(input);
               }
               else
               {
                   return null; // alternatively, you could throw an exception
               }
           }
       }
       );
| improve this answer | |
4
0

You might want to use verify() in combination with the ArgumentCaptor to assure execution in the test and the ArgumentCaptor to evaluate the arguments:

ArgumentCaptor<String> argument = ArgumentCaptor.forClass(String.class);
verify(mock).myFunction(argument.capture());
assertEquals("the expected value here", argument.getValue());

The argument's value is obviously accessible via the argument.getValue() for further manipulation / checking /whatever.

| improve this answer | |
3
0

This is a bit old, but I came here because I had the same issue. I'm using JUnit but this time in a Kotlin app with mockk. I'm posting a sample here for reference and comparison with the Java counterpart:

@Test
fun demo() {
  // mock a sample function
  val aMock: (String) -> (String) = mockk()

  // make it return the same as the argument on every invocation
  every {
    aMock.invoke(any())
  } answers {
    firstArg()
  }

  // test it
  assertEquals("senko", aMock.invoke("senko"))
  assertEquals("senko1", aMock.invoke("senko1"))
  assertNotEquals("not a senko", aMock.invoke("senko"))
}
| improve this answer | |
2
0

You can achieve this by using ArgumentCaptor

Imagine you have bean function like so.

public interface Application {
  public String myFunction(String abc);
}

Then in your test class:

//Use ArgumentCaptor to capture the value
ArgumentCaptor<String> param = ArgumentCaptor.forClass(String.class);


when(mock.myFunction(param.capture())).thenAnswer(new Answer<String>() {
    @Override
    public String answer(InvocationOnMock invocation) throws Throwable {
      return param.getValue();//return the captured value.
    }
  });

OR if you fan of lambda simply do:

//Use ArgumentCaptor to capture the value
ArgumentCaptor<String> param = ArgumentCaptor.forClass(String.class);


when(mock.myFunction(param.capture()))
    .thenAnswer((invocation) -> param.getValue());

Summary: Use argumentcaptor, to capture the parameter passed. Later in answer return the value captured using getValue.

| improve this answer | |
  • This doesn´t work (anymore?). Regarding to the docs: This method must be used inside of verification. That means you can only capture the value when using the verify method – Muhammed Misir Feb 10 at 11:14
  • 1. Not sure what you mean by This doesn´t work (anymore?). I have this working on my instance. 2. Sorry, I am not clear on the point you trying to make. The answer is specific to OP's question. – Cyril Cherian Feb 11 at 5:00

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