26

Why can't you loop through [AnyObject]? directly? What does it mean that there is no named generator? What is the proper technique for looping through an [AnyObject]? type?

This code is giving me an error telling me that it does not have a member named generator.

for screen in NSScreen.screens() {
        var result : Bool = workspace.setDesktopImageURL(imgurl, forScreen: screen, options: nil, error: &error)
}
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53

screens returns an optional, so before using the actual value you have to unwrap - the recommended method is optional binding:

if let screens = NSScreen.screens() {
    for screen in screens {
        var result : Bool = workspace.setDesktopImageURL(imgurl, forScreen: screen, options: nil, error: &error)
    }
}

Read more about Optionals

Note that NSScreen.screens returns [AnyObject]?, so you might want to cast the array as [NSScreen] in the optional binding:

if let screens = NSScreen.screens() as? [NSScreen] {
    for screen in screens {
        var result : Bool = workspace.setDesktopImageURL(imgurl, forScreen: screen, options: nil, error: &error)
    }
}

Addendum Answer to question in comment: why the error message says [AnyObject]? does not have a member named generator

An optional is of a different type than the value it contains (an optional is actually an enum). You can iterate an array, but you cannot iterate over an integer or an enum.

To understand the difference, let me make a real life example: you buy a new TV on ebay, the package is shipped to you, the first thing you do is to check if the package (the optional) is empty (nil). Once you verify that the TV is inside, you have to unwrap it, and put the box aside. You cannot use the TV while it's in the package. Similarly, an optional is a container: it is not the value it contains, and it doesn't have the same type. It can be empty, or it can contain a valid value.

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  • OK this is clearly the response (will accept as soon as the 5 min are up). In the mean time do you mind just giving me a little more color in your answer (teach a man to fish:). I get that NSScreen.screens() might be nil so I need to protect against that but what does it mean that there is no member named generator. Also why do I than have to put forScreen: screen as NSScreen Aren't we looping through NSScreens? – Mika Nov 10 '14 at 20:56
  • See updated answer. Hope the example makes everything clearer :) – Antonio Nov 10 '14 at 21:15
  • Super clear!!!! Many thanks... I will edit the question so it can be helpful to more people. – Mika Nov 10 '14 at 21:23
  • All enumerable types like arrays, dictionaries, sets, your own types that are enumerable, have a member named "generator", which is the thing that is responsible for iterating. An optional hasn't. – gnasher729 Jul 7 '15 at 11:05
15

Here's an alternative that will save you one level of indentation:

for screen in NSScreen.screens() ?? []  {
    var result : Bool = workspace.setDesktopImageURL(imgurl, forScreen: screen, options: nil, error: &error)  
}

Using the nil-coalescing operator (??) provides an empty array in case of nil, and Swift treats screens() as non-optional.

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  • 1
    Great tip, but I think it can be even shorter: for screen in NSScreen.screens() ?? [] {, because you're not going to actually iterate it. – Serhii Yakovenko Jun 10 '16 at 13:59
  • thanks, that's even better. For some reason I thought the type of [] would wrong, maybe it's due to changes in the languages? – user2378197 Jun 15 '16 at 14:17

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