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Is there some way I can have a global variable (in this case a vector) retain its contents throughout any functions? I'm trying to see if I can do this:

vector<string> collected_input; //global

void some_function{
string bla = "towel";
collected_input.push_back(bla); //collected_input gains "towel"
}

void some_otherfunction{
string xyz = "zyx"
collected_input.push_back(xyz); //collected_input gains "zyx"
}

int main(){
// print the contents of the collected_input vector
}
  • 1
    What is the actual problem you are having? – Remy Lebeau Nov 11 '14 at 2:54
  • The compiler is telling me that in main(), collected_input was not declared in that scope. – user11892 Nov 11 '14 at 2:56
  • 1
    @RogerVillanueva Then the code you have posted is not representative of your problem, as your main function is empty and could not produce that error. – Jason C Nov 11 '14 at 2:57
  • @RogerVillanueva: you probably have a missing closing brace somewhere above where collected_input and main() are defined. – Remy Lebeau Nov 11 '14 at 3:00
  • Do you multiple source files and global variable is defined in one source file then you need to declare it in other source files – radar Nov 11 '14 at 3:01
1

What you have shown will work just fine, provided main() is calling some_function() and some_otherfunction():

#include <ostream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

vector<string> collected_input;

void some_function()
{
    string bla = "towel";
    collected_input.push_back(bla);
}

void some_otherfunction()
{
    string xyz = "zyx"
    collected_input.push_back(xyz);
}

int main()
{
    some_function();
    some_otherfunction();

    for (vector<string>::iterator iter = collected_input.begin();
         iter != collected_input.end();
         ++iter)
    {
        cout << *iter << '\n';
    }

    return 0;
}
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0

The code you posted will achieve what you are looking for. Your have a single instance of a vector (collected_input), which is used across multiple functions. Your vector is effectively global, and in fact it is possible for other source files to access it by declaring a vector of the same name using the extern keyword, although this is highly recommended against.

Of course, right now your program does nothing because your main() function does not contain any code. If you were to call both of your functions from main() and then print the vector, you will find that both functions successfully operated on the vector.

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