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I have to add some extra work to a database context SaveChanges method. I need this work to be done after base.SaveChanges() method, because I need records Ids after they were added to the database. The outline of my SaveChanges methods looks like follows (two try..catch blocks are needed to isolate saving db changes from other operations):

public override int SaveChanges()
{
    using (var scope = new TransactionScope())
    {
        var result = 0;
        try
        {
            result = base.SaveChanges();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            //Log context exception             
            throw;
        }

        try
        {
            //do some extra work
            var extraWorkRes = DoExtraWork();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            //Log exception
            throw;
        }

        scope.Complete();
        return result;
    }
}

My problem is SaveChangesAsync method, because I don't have a lot of experience with .NET tasks and don't know if I am overriding it correctly.

public override  async Task<int> SaveChangesAsync(CancellationToken cancellationToken)
 {
     using (var scope = new TransactionScope())
     {
         var result = 0;

         try
         {
             result = await base.SaveChangesAsync(cancellationToken);
         }
         catch (Exception ex)
         {
             //log context exception
             throw;
         }

         try
         {
            //do some extra work
            var extraWorkRes = await DoExtraWorkAsync(cancellationToken);
         }
         catch (Exception ex)
         {
             //Log exception
             throw;
         }

         scope.Complete();
         return result;
     }
 }

 private Task<int> DoExtraWorkAsync(CancellationToken cancellationToken)
 {
    return Task.Run<int>(() => this.DoExtraWork(cancellationToken));
 }

I need help, some advice how to correctly override SaveChangesAsync.

Thanks in advance for your help.

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2

Wrapping a synchronous method in a Task.Run and calling it TheOriginalMethodAsync is a common code smell.

Is DoExtraWork() a CPU bound operation that you'd like to free the current thread while its happening? If so, refactor it to be inline:

var extraWorkRes = await Task.Run<int>(() => this.DoExtraWork());

If not, simply call it directly:

var extraWorkRes = this.DoExtraWork();

Do you need the result of DoExtraWork outside of SaveChanges? If not, you don't need to assign it.

In case this is your real code, please also note that you missed a closing bracket from Task.Run. Everything else looks fine to me. Does it encounter any issues when you run it or are you just checking for sanity's sake?

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  • These are only sketches of my real methods, result of DoExtraWork method is further processed, but here has been omitted for clarity. Could you please tell me more about why you think that making async version of DoExtraWork, in the way that I done, is a code smell? Edit: In DoExtraWork I write some data to database. – adams Nov 11 '14 at 13:56
  • When you call a method DoSomethingAsync() you're telling the consuming programmer that the natural state of that method's contents is to be run asynchronously. If all that method does is wrap up an existing synchronous method in Task.Run, then you've added work and blurred the meaning of the code. It's best practice to use Task.Run directly when you need to spin off a Task for some synchronous code. – Steve Lillis Nov 11 '14 at 14:02
  • If DoExtraWork() is calling Asynchronous methods, make DoExtraWork() return Task<ResultType> and mark it async, rename the method DoExtraWorkAsync() and inside it, await all Async methods you call. You can await it as you have done now, but it'll be cleaner, avoids Task.Run() and follows the propogation of async/await that you'd expect from methods that make async calls (like writing to the database). In effect, write an async version of DoExtraWork that uses all the asynchronous versions of the calls that DoExtraWork made. – Steve Lillis Nov 11 '14 at 14:04
  • Ok, now I understand and agree with your opinion. – adams Nov 11 '14 at 14:26

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