205

Is it possible to declare two variables of different types in the initialization body of a for loop in C++?

For example:

for(int i=0,j=0 ...

defines two integers. Can I define an int and a char in the initialization body? How would this be done?

  • 3
    It is possible in g++-4.4 (-std=c++0x) in the form of for(auto i=0, j=0.0; ..., but this possibility was removed in g++-4.5 to coincide with the c++0x texts. – rafak May 9 '10 at 11:11
  • 2
    Actually that other question should be closed as a duplicate of this, because this has better answers. – Peter Cordes Sep 4 '16 at 9:36
197

Not possible, but you can do:

float f;
int i;
for (i = 0,f = 0.0; i < 5; i++)
{
  //...
}

Or, explicitly limit the scope of f and i using additional brackets:

{
    float f; 
    int i;
    for (i = 0,f = 0.0; i < 5; i++)
    {
       //...
    }
}
  • I know this is a very old question, but can you explain why some would do it with the extra brackets around it, as in your second example? – ford Mar 15 '13 at 19:32
  • 9
    @fizzisist to explicitly limit the scope of f and i to only parts of the code where they are used. – MK. Mar 15 '13 at 20:15
  • @MK. Thanks, that's what I suspected. I edited your answer to explain that. – ford Mar 16 '13 at 15:58
  • Only one question: Why like this? :O – rohan-patel Oct 5 '13 at 6:46
  • Because it works like 'int a = 0, b = 4', I assume. That being said, scoping f and i will likely be useful only to prevent reusing those names (which is a fair reason), but the generated code will typically be the same on a modern compiler (in this case). – Asu Oct 2 '16 at 13:02
260

No - but technically there is a work-around (not that i'd actually use it unless forced to):

for(struct { int a; char b; } s = { 0, 'a' } ; s.a < 5 ; ++s.a) 
{
    std::cout << s.a << " " << s.b << std::endl;
}
  • 3
    This does not compile on VS 2008, but does on Comeau online ;-) – JRL Apr 22 '10 at 0:22
  • 7
    @JRL: Oh, neither does VS2005. Yet another non-compliance feature in VC++ i guess. – Georg Fritzsche Apr 22 '10 at 0:27
  • 3
    I've done the equivalent in Perl. I haven't tried sneaking something like this through a code review in C++, though. – John Jul 26 '13 at 15:33
  • 19
    with c++11 I you can make this example shorter using default values struct { int a=0; char b='a'; } s; – Ryan Haining Jul 27 '15 at 6:26
  • 1
    Of course it's not something you should actually use... – Georg Fritzsche Jul 6 '16 at 14:37
101

C++17: Yes! You should use a structured binding declaration. The syntax is supported in gcc-7 and clang-4.0 (clang live example). This allows us to unpack a tuple like so:

for (auto [i, f, s] = std::tuple{1, 1.0, std::string{"abc"}}; i < N; ++i) {
    // ...
}

The above will give you:

  • int i set to 1
  • double f set to 1.0
  • std::string s set to "abc"

Make sure to #include <tuple> for this kind of declaration.

You can specify the exact types inside the tuple by typing them all out as I have with the std::string, if you want to name a type. For example:

auto [vec, i32] = std::tuple{std::vector<int>{3, 4, 5}, std::int32_t{12}}

C++14: You can do the same as C++11 (below) with the addition of type-based std::get. So instead of std::get<0>(t) in the below example, you can have std::get<int>(t).


C++11: std::make_pair allows you to do this, as well as std::make_tuple for more than two objects.

for (auto p = std::make_pair(5, std::string("Hello World")); p.first < 10; ++p.first) {
    std::cout << p.second << std::endl;
}

std::make_pair will return the two arguments in a std::pair. The elements can be accessed with .first and .second.

For more than two objects, you'll need to use a std::tuple

for (auto t = std::make_tuple(0, std::string("Hello world"), std::vector<int>{});
        std::get<0>(t) < 10;
        ++std::get<0>(t)) {
    std::cout << std::get<1>(t) << std::endl; // cout Hello world
    std::get<2>(t).push_back(std::get<0>(t)); // add counter value to the vector
}

std::make_tuple is a variadic template that will construct a tuple of any number of arguments (with some technical limitations of course). The elements can be accessed by index with std::get<INDEX>(tuple_object)

Within the for loop bodies you can easily alias the objects, though you still need to use .first or std::get for the for loop condition and update expression

for (auto t = std::make_tuple(0, std::string("Hello world"), std::vector<int>{});
        std::get<0>(t) < 10;
        ++std::get<0>(t)) {
    auto& i = std::get<0>(t);
    auto& s = std::get<1>(t);
    auto& v = std::get<2>(t);
    std::cout << s << std::endl; // cout Hello world
    v.push_back(i); // add counter value to the vector
}

C++98 and C++03 You can explicitly name the types of a std::pair. There is no standard way to generalize this to more than two types though:

for (std::pair<int, std::string> p(5, "Hello World"); p.first < 10; ++p.first) {
    std::cout << p.second << std::endl;
}
  • 3
    If you are doing C++17, you can even drop the make_ and write std::pair(1, 1.0). – Marc Glisse Oct 12 '16 at 22:46
  • The hairy C++14 style tuple / pair business -- all good (probably, upvoted), but looks bizarre :) – mlvljr Jul 5 '17 at 11:14
14

You can't declare multiple types in the initialization, but you can assign to multiple types E.G.

{
   int i;
   char x;
   for(i = 0, x = 'p'; ...){
      ...
   }
}

Just declare them in their own scope.

1

See "Is there a way to define variables of two types in for loop?" for another way involving nesting multiple for loops. The advantage of the other way over Georg's "struct trick" is that it (1) allows you to have a mixture of static and non-static local variables and (2) it allows you to have non-copyable variables. The downside is that it is far less readable and may be less efficient.

0

Define a macro:

#define FOR( typeX,x,valueX,  typeY,y,valueY,  condition, increments) typeX x; typeY y; for(x=valueX,y=valueY;condition;increments)

FOR(int,i,0,  int,f,0.0,  i < 5, i++)
{
  //...
}

Just remember, your variable scopes will not be within the for loop this way either.

  • You could easily overcome that limitation by wrapping the code in the macro in a separate scope using { and }. – Nathan Osman Jul 19 '13 at 21:13
  • 4
    No he couldn't. His macro doesn't wrap the loop body. He could add an extra openning bracket, but that would require an "extra" closing bracket when using the macro. – John Jul 26 '13 at 15:31
  • 3
    It's an interesting idea, but I would sooner use any of the other answers before considering this. – gregn3 May 30 '18 at 23:12

protected by eyllanesc Aug 31 '18 at 21:11

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