16

HI,

In C++ inner class,

class A {
    public: 
         void f1();
    private:
         void f2();
    class B {
       private void f3(); 
    };

 }

Does an inner class (B) has a pointer to its parent class (A)? (like it does in Java). And can B calls its parent class public/private method (like it does in Java).

Thank you.

28

No -- in C++, nesting classes only affects names and visibility, not the semantics of the class itself. As far as generated code goes, the nested class is no different from one that isn't nested.

All that's changed is the visibility and the name (e.g. if it's in a private: section of the outer class, it's not visible to the outside world, and if it's in a public: section, it's visible, but (of course) to name it you use outer_class::inner_class. It's still a completely separate class though -- just for example, you can create an instance of the inner class without creating any instance of the outer class.

Edit: Sorry, I missed part of your question. In C++ 0x, the inner class does have access to the the private parts of the outer class -- in essence, it's as if the outer class has declared the inner class as its friend, so private names are visible, but you still need to pass it something like a reference to an object of the outer class before it can invoke any non-static member functions of the outer class.

Although this isn't supposed to be the case yet, I believe most compilers implement this particular part already.

  • 4
    It appears this is changing in C++0x. C++03 says: "The members of a nested class have no special access to members of an enclosing class." C++0x FCD says: "A nested class is a member and as such has the same access rights as any other member." (both §11.8/1). (The change was introduced by CWG defects 45 and 494: open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/cwg_defects.html#45 and open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/cwg_defects.html#494) – James McNellis Apr 22 '10 at 1:12
  • Good — that removes the urge to write friend class {, which is supported by some compilers, but non-obviously makes the nested class not a member at all! – Potatoswatter Apr 22 '10 at 2:39
  • 1
    @Potato: Interestingly, even Comeau in strict C++03 mode does not follow the C++03 language. This leads me to believe that (a) it is likely impossible for some reason to follow the C++03 language (though I haven't yet figured out why, exactly, besides what is mentioned in the DRs linked above), and (b) it's likely that nobody actually follows the C++03 language :-). – James McNellis Apr 22 '10 at 16:20
  • @James: I think GCC 3.x followed this rule, but I'm not sure what version and I don't still have a copy. – Potatoswatter Apr 22 '10 at 16:59
7

No, Class B does not have a pointer to Class A, unless you explicitly add it.

0

Does it have a pointer to the parent: No.
Does it have access to the parents private members: Sort of

I think the if it has access is not well defined in the standard I could be wrong.
But you can access it in g++

#include <iostream>

class X
{
    class Y
    {
        public:
            Y(X* p)
                :parent(p)
            {}
            void TryY()
            {
                // Access a private member of X
                ++(parent->value);
            }

        private:
            X*  parent;
    };

    public:
        X()
            :y(this)
        {
            value = 4;
        }

        void TryY()
        {
            y.TryY();
            std::cout << value << std::endl;
        }
    private:
        Y   y;
        int value;

};

int main()
{
    X   x;
    x.TryY();
}
  • It should be incorrect behaviour for C++03 as per §11.8/1. – Georg Fritzsche Apr 22 '10 at 1:34

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