2

I am unfortunately forced to work on a Windows PC part of the time.

When I check out my project, git status immediately says:

modified:   bin/my_executable

git diff says:

diff --git a/bin/my_executable b/bin/my_executable
old mode 100755
new mode 100644

"oh, simple" I thought. "Windows just strips the executable bit away."

Now I've been trying to get Git to stop it for the past 30 minutes and I'm about to have a frustration provoked aneurism. Checking out the file doesn't work:

$ git checkout bin/my_executable
$ git diff
diff --git a/bin/my_executable b/bin/my_executable
old mode 100755
new mode 100644

Hard reset, no effect:

$ git reset --hard
HEAD is now at 789abcd My last commit text
$ git diff
diff --git a/bin/my_executable b/bin/my_executable
old mode 100755
new mode 100644

Switching the executable bit on using git update-index doesn't work:

$ git update-index --chmod=+x bin/my_executable
$ git diff
diff --git a/bin/my_executable b/bin/my_executable
old mode 100755
new mode 100644
$ git checkout bin/my_executable
$ git diff
diff --git a/bin/my_executable b/bin/my_executable
old mode 100755
new mode 100644

Asking Git to kindly ignore the executable bit changes didn't work:

$ git config --global core.fileMode false
$ git diff
diff --git a/bin/my_executable b/bin/my_executable
old mode 100755
new mode 100644
$ git checkout bin/my_executable
$ git diff
diff --git a/bin/my_executable b/bin/my_executable
old mode 100755
new mode 100644

This is a complete blocker. Git won't even let me pop my stash without first "committing my changes".

Can anybody help?

  • Sorry for not having read accurately enough. I notice you have set core.fileMode with the --global option here. Is it possible that the local repository configuration is overriding that? It should normally be set per-repo, and changing the global value should normally have little effect. – user743382 Nov 12 '14 at 10:20
  • @hvd: Yeah, I just checked for that. Turns out somehow core.fileMode was set to true in the local config. I can't imagine how that happened, I hadn't even heard of the option before today. Un-setting the local option fixed my issue. – Hubro Nov 12 '14 at 10:20
  • Likely that is because you cloned it on a file system that did support the executable bit, and then moved the entire repository elsewhere. Or maybe you cloned it using an OS that uses OS-specific tricks for the file system to get file permissions working, which (naturally) won't work when another OS then accesses it. – user743382 Nov 12 '14 at 10:23
  • @hvd: I am synchronizing the repository between a Windows and a Linux system, true, but I've never had this problem before. Presumably, the core.fileMode=true setting is implicit on Linux, not explicitly set in the local config? – Hubro Nov 12 '14 at 10:25
  • I'm not entirely sure about it and cannot check right now, but I think I recall seeing it set explicitly in config files. But it's not that it'll always be set to true: if you clone a repository on Linux on a filesystem that cannot keep track of the executable bit in some manner, you should get it set to core.fileMode=false on Linux too, and that might explain why you normally don't have the problem. – user743382 Nov 12 '14 at 10:29
1

After doing:

git config --list

I noticed that core.fileMode was set to true locally. I don't know how that happened, but it probably had something to do with the fact that the project directory is synchronized between a Windows and a Linux PC. I have used this workflow for years without this ever happening, though.

In short, this fixed my problem:

git config --unset core.fileMode
  • In my case core.fileMod was false locally, but this command helped anyway. Thanks. – Pavel Vlasov Feb 24 '18 at 18:12

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