21

I have a one-dimensional NumPy array that consists of zeroes and ones like so:

array([0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1])

I'd like a quick way to just "flip" the values such that zeroes become ones, and ones become zeroes, resulting in a NumPy array like this:

array([1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0])

Is there an easy one-liner for this? I looked at the fliplr() function, but this seems to require NumPy arrays of dimensions two or greater. I'm sure there's a fairly simple answer, but any help would be appreciated.

60

There must be something in your Q that i do not understand...

Anyway

In [2]: from numpy import array

In [3]: a = array((1,0,0,1,1,0,0))

In [4]: b = 1-a

In [5]: print a ; print b
[1 0 0 1 1 0 0]
[0 1 1 0 0 1 1]

In [6]: 
  • 3
    This should be the accepted answer. its the simplest solution – hitzg Nov 12 '14 at 15:42
  • 3
    Nice and simple indeed, +1. The only potential issue is that it isn't easy to do in-place. Just because of that I prefer using bitwise XOR, a = a ^ 1, which lets you do a ^= 1. – Jaime Nov 12 '14 at 16:43
  • @Jaime you should provide this as an answer a ^= 1 succinct and pythonic. Thanks! – Andreas Klintberg Nov 19 '17 at 2:06
11

A sign that you should probably be using a boolean datatype

a = np.array([0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1], dtype=np.bool)
# or
b = ~a
b = np.logical_not(a)
  • 3
    I like answers that solve the problem rather than the question. – gboffi Nov 14 '14 at 16:49
4

Mathematically, the first thing that comes to mind is (value + 1) % 2.

>>> (a+1)%2
array([1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0], dtype=int32)
  • Love this. Quick, succinct, logical. Thanks for this. – kylerthecreator Nov 12 '14 at 15:40
  • Take a look at @gboffi 's answer... – heltonbiker Nov 12 '14 at 15:42
  • Quick, succinct, logical? Modulo is slow as hell I don't think there is something more logical and quick than the answer of @gboffi ;) – tamasgal Dec 6 '17 at 9:50
2
answer = numpy.ones_like(a) - a
  • 1
    (actually @gboffi 's answer is better) – heltonbiker Nov 12 '14 at 15:43
1

another superfluous option:

numpy.logical_not(a).astype(int)
1

I also found a way to do it:

In [1]: from numpy import array

In [2]: a = array([1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0])

In [3]: b = (~a.astype(bool)).astype(int)


In [4]: print(a); print(b)
[1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0]
[0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1]

Still, I think that @gboffi's answer is the best. I'd have upvoted it but I don't have enough reputation yet :(

  • Welcome to Stack Overflow! If a question is already answered - especially if it's from 3 years ago(!) - please don't add a solution that you know is inferior than the one that was selected. Good luck! – GalAbra Jan 28 '18 at 19:25

protected by Sheldore May 20 at 7:59

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