-4
using System; 

class FirstArray
{
    static void Main()
    {
        int numOfGrades;
        double[] listOfGrades;
        Console.Write("How many students in the class? ");
        numOfGrades = int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());
        listOfGrades = new double[numOfGrades];                
        ReadGrades(listOfGrades);
        double sumGrades = GetGradesSum(listOfGrades);                      
        Console.WriteLine("\n\nClass statistics\n--------------------");
        Console.WriteLine("Grades sum = {0:F2}", sumGrades);
    }

    static void ReadGrades(double[] grades)
    {
        for(int i = 0; i < grades.Length; i++)
        {
            Console.Write("Enter the grade of student {0}:", i + 1);
            grades[i] = double.Parse(Console.ReadLine());   
        }        
    }

    static double GetGradesSum(double[] grades)
    {
        double sum = 0;         
        for(int i = 0; i < grades.Length; i++)
            sum += grades[i];           
            return sum;
    }
}

Hi everyone,

Why does the for loop in the GetGradeSum method not require {}? When I do put the braces in, there is a compile time errors of "unreachable code detected" and "not all code paths return a value. Does it have something to do with the return function?

Thanks in advance!

3
  • 1
    depends on where you put the curly brackets. With the code correctly formatted it should be more obvious that the for loop only applies to the next line when the curly brackets are not present.
    – juharr
    Nov 12 '14 at 17:50
  • @juharr I strongly suspect that the edit you've made is invalid as OP could have assumed C# is similar to other languages (like Python that use spaces/indentation as block markers... Nov 12 '14 at 17:51
  • @AlexeiLevenkov Yeah, I can see how that could make it less obvious as to why the OP put the brackets around the return as well. I've put that one change back to make it clearer.
    – juharr
    Nov 12 '14 at 17:57
4

Why does the for loop in the GetGradeSum method not require {}?

Because its body is a single statement. It's much simpler to understand if you indent your code properly. Your current code is more clearly written as:

static double GetGradesSum(double[] grades)
{
    double sum = 0;

    for(int i = 0; i < grades.Length; i++)
        sum += grades[i];

    return sum;
}

Note how the return statement is not part of the loop. If it were, it would return the first grade, rather than the sum.

So the equivalent code with braces is:

static double GetGradesSum(double[] grades)
{
    double sum = 0;

    for(int i = 0; i < grades.Length; i++)
    {
        sum += grades[i];
    }
    return sum;
}

It sounds like you tried to put braces around both statements, so:

// Broken
static double GetGradesSum(double[] grades)
{
    double sum = 0;

    for(int i = 0; i < grades.Length; i++)
    {
        sum += grades[i];
        return sum;
    }
}

At this point, the compiler complains because it's entirely possible to reach the end of the method without returning anything - if grades has a length of 0, we'll never go into the body of the loop, so never return.

Note that LINQ makes all of this irrelevant anyway, mind you - you can just write:

using System.Linq;
...

double sumGrades = listOfGrades.Sum();
3
  • Note that Sum will throw if there are no items, rather than returning 0.
    – Servy
    Nov 12 '14 at 17:51
  • @Servy No it doesn't.
    – juharr
    Nov 12 '14 at 17:53
  • 1
    @Servy: No, it won't. From the docs: "This method returns zero if source contains no elements."
    – Jon Skeet
    Nov 12 '14 at 17:54
1

If you don't write braces {}, then only the line after the for (...) is executed inside the loop.

Basically:

for (...)
    A();
    B();

is equivalent to:

for (...)
{
    A();
}

B();

This also answers your second question, as the return statement would be inside the loop (assuming you put } after it).

0

If the loop body consist of only one statement, you can omit the braces. but if you do:

for(int i = 0; i < grades.Length; i++)
{
     sum += grades[i];
     return sum;
}

In this case there is no guarantee that for loop will run (e.g i < grages.Length might not be true) so you get the error.Instead you should move the return statement outside of the loop.

1
  • I can only guess. Because it actually says much less? Basically only as much as his first paragraph does? Nov 13 '14 at 10:02
0

Braces are not required when there is only one statement to execute.

This code:

for(int i = 0; i < grades.Length; i++)
    sum += grades[i];

is equivalent to this code:

for(int i = 0; i < grades.Length; i++)
{
    sum += grades[i]
}

If there is more than one statement to execute, braces are required.

On a side note, it is always more clear to use the braces than not to.

0

Having a for loop without brackets means you're going to apply the 'loop' on the next statement only

So

for(int i = 0; i < grades.Length; i++)
        sum += grades[i];

is equivalent to

for(int i = 0; i < grades.Length; i++)
        {
            sum += grades[i];
        }
0

The indentation in the method is a bit confusing, as it can lead you into thinking that the return statement is part of the loop.

The braces around the code in the loop is only mandatory if you want to put more than one statement in the loop. If you don't have braces, then only the statement following the for clause is part of the loop.

If you add the braces for the loop, they should be only around the statement after the loop:

static double GetGradesSum(double[] grades)
{
    double sum = 0;

    for(int i = 0; i < grades.Length; i++)
    {
        sum += grades[i];
    }
    return sum;

}

If you instead included the return statement inside the loop, then it would only be executed if the code inside the loop was executed, so you get a compiler error telling you that it's guaranteed that the return statement is executed.

0

Quite Simply, all the answers here are accurate. In most languages that parallel C, you do NOT need curly braces if you're targeting a single statement .

Meaning the VERY NEXT LINE after you initiate the for loop is the only statement included within the for loop.

If you put Braces around your return statement, you'll receive the compile error as you're including the return statement as part of the for loop.

Again, You can include braces around the singular targeted statement if you'd like as a programming aesthetic, but it's not required unless you have multiple statements you want to include within your loop.

This principle is the same for if/else statements.

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