28

I have a string which should specify a date and time in ISO 8601 format, which may or may not have milliseconds in it, and I am wanting to get a struct tm from it as well as any millisecond value that may have been specified (which can be assumed to be zero if not present in the string).

What would be involved in detecting whether the string is in the correct format, as well as converting a user-specified string into the struct tm and millisecond values?

If it weren't for the millisconds issue, I could probably just use the C function strptime(), but I do not know what the defined behavior of that function is supposed to be when the seconds contain a decimal point.

As one final caveat, if it is at all possible, I would greatly prefer a solution that does not have any dependency on functions that are only found in Boost (but I'm happy to accept C++11 as a prerequisite).

The input is going to look something like:

2014-11-12T19:12:14.505Z

or

2014-11-12T12:12:14.505-5:00

Z, in this case, indicates UTC, but any time zone might be used, and will be expressed as a + or - hours/minutes offset from GMT. The decimal portion of the seconds field is optional, but the fact that it may be there at all is why I cannot simply use strptime() or std::get_time(), which do not describe any particular defined behavior if such a character is found in the seconds portion of the string.

5
  • Do we have to look up what that date format looks like in order to offer suggestions? – Jonathan Wood Nov 12 '14 at 19:58
  • 2
    Can you use C++11? std::get_time – Barry Nov 12 '14 at 19:59
  • What about strptime()? – cdhowie Nov 12 '14 at 20:13
  • 2
    Also, if you have access to Boost libraries - Boost Date Time has functions that can do it? You won't need C++11 for that. Info is here – ha9u63ar Nov 12 '14 at 20:13
  • 1
    strptime and std::get_time do not take the time zone into consideration... I still need the time zone to be parsed, giving me a struct tm in GMT – markt1964 Nov 12 '14 at 20:27
21

You can use C's sscanf (http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/cstdio/sscanf/) to parse it:

const char *dateStr = "2014-11-12T19:12:14.505Z";
int y,M,d,h,m;
float s;
sscanf(dateStr, "%d-%d-%dT%d:%d:%fZ", &y, &M, &d, &h, &m, &s);

If you have std::string it can be called like this (http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/string/string/c_str/):

std::string dateStr = "2014-11-12T19:12:14.505Z";
sscanf(dateStr.c_str(), "%d-%d-%dT%d:%d:%fZ", &y, &M, &d, &h, &m, &s);

If it should handle different timezones you need to use sscanf return value - number of parsed arguments:

int tzh = 0, tzm = 0;
if (6 < sscanf(dateStr.c_str(), "%d-%d-%dT%d:%d:%f%d:%dZ", &y, &M, &d, &h, &m, &s, &tzh, &tzm)) {
    if (tzh < 0) {
       tzm = -tzm;    // Fix the sign on minutes.
    }
}

And then you can fill tm (http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/ctime/tm/) struct:

tm time = { 0 };
time.tm_year = y - 1900; // Year since 1900
time.tm_mon = M - 1;     // 0-11
time.tm_mday = d;        // 1-31
time.tm_hour = h;        // 0-23
time.tm_min = m;         // 0-59
time.tm_sec = (int)s;    // 0-61 (0-60 in C++11)

It also can be done with std::get_time (http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/io/manip/get_time) since C++11 as @Barry mentioned in comment how do I parse an iso 8601 date (with optional milliseconds) to a struct tm in C++?

9
  • 3
    This assumes the timezone will be Z, which as stated in the question won't always be the case. – Mark Ransom Nov 12 '14 at 21:41
  • 1
    "If it should handle different timezones you need to use sscanf return value - number of parsed arguments..." -- Please do check *scanf() return value in any case. Not doing so leaves you wide open for undefined behaviour (malformed input, uninitialized variable). – DevSolar Apr 27 '16 at 7:35
  • 1
    For me it works only with time.tm_isdst = 0;. It was 1 hour less in other case. – Artem Mostyaev Feb 21 '17 at 12:26
  • 1
    I used the solution above as a basis for a C++ iso8601 library github.com/TimSC/cppiso8601 – TimSC Sep 12 '17 at 19:14
  • 1
    You really should do tm time = {0}; In the last code example. I search for hours why my time would jump one our back and forth sometimes. – Stretchdude Mar 25 at 14:30
32

New answer for old question. Rationale: updated tools.

Using this free, open source library, one can parse into a std::chrono::time_point<system_clock, milliseconds>, which has the advantage over a tm of being able to hold millisecond precision. And if you really need to, you can continue on to the C API via system_clock::to_time_t (losing the milliseconds along the way).

#include "date.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>

date::sys_time<std::chrono::milliseconds>
parse8601(std::istream&& is)
{
    std::string save;
    is >> save;
    std::istringstream in{save};
    date::sys_time<std::chrono::milliseconds> tp;
    in >> date::parse("%FT%TZ", tp);
    if (in.fail())
    {
        in.clear();
        in.exceptions(std::ios::failbit);
        in.str(save);
        in >> date::parse("%FT%T%Ez", tp);
    }
    return tp;
}

int
main()
{
    using namespace date;
    using namespace std;
    cout << parse8601(istringstream{"2014-11-12T19:12:14.505Z"}) << '\n';
    cout << parse8601(istringstream{"2014-11-12T12:12:14.505-5:00"}) << '\n';
}

This outputs:

2014-11-12 19:12:14.505
2014-11-12 17:12:14.505

Note that both outputs are UTC. The parse converted the local time to UTC using the -5:00 offset. If you actually want local time, there is also a way to parse into a type called date::local_time<milliseconds> which would then parse but ignore the offset. One can even parse the offset into a chrono::minutes if desired (using a parse overload taking minutes&).

The precision of the parse is controlled by the precision of the chrono::time_point you pass in, instead of by flags in the format string. And the offset can either be of the style +/-hhmm with %z, or +/-[h]h:mm with %Ez.

2
  • 3
    Really helpful. I am much impressed by your library. Hope it will make it into some future standard! – stj Nov 15 '16 at 23:01
  • 3
    It is in the standard now. – JeffV Mar 31 '20 at 16:26
5

Modern C++ version of parse ISO 8601* function

* - this code supports only subset of ISO 8601. The only supported forms are "2020-09-19T05:12:32Z" and "2020-09-19T05:12:32.123Z". Milliseconds can be 3 digit length or no milliseconds part at all, no timezone except Z, no other more rare features.

#include <cstdlib>
#include <ctime>
#include <string>

#ifdef _WIN32
#define timegm _mkgmtime
#endif

inline int ParseInt(const char* value)
{
    return std::strtol(value, nullptr, 10);
}

// ParseISO8601 returns milliseconds since 1970

std::time_t ParseISO8601(const std::string& input)
{
    constexpr const size_t expectedLength = sizeof("1234-12-12T12:12:12Z") - 1;
    static_assert(expectedLength == 20, "Unexpected ISO 8601 date/time length");

    if (input.length() < expectedLength)
    {
        return 0;
    }

    std::tm time = { 0 };
    time.tm_year = ParseInt(&input[0]) - 1900;
    time.tm_mon = ParseInt(&input[5]) - 1;
    time.tm_mday = ParseInt(&input[8]);
    time.tm_hour = ParseInt(&input[11]);
    time.tm_min = ParseInt(&input[14]);
    time.tm_sec = ParseInt(&input[17]);
    time.tm_isdst = 0;
    const int millis = input.length() > 20 ? ParseInt(&input[20]) : 0;
    return timegm(&time) * 1000 + millis;
}
10
  • If you ever whant to do this use c++, std::chrono and the istream >> en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/chrono/duration/from_stream – schultz Oct 11 '18 at 21:06
  • Thanks. You showed great chrono feature. Unfortunately it is C++20.\ – Sergey Oct 12 '18 at 7:11
  • what happens if ms are like .00123? are they managed like .123? – david Jul 7 '20 at 13:19
  • .00123 is not compatible with ISO 8601 (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_8601). If you find string like you wrote, it will be treated incorrectly: .00123 == 0.123; .1500 == 1.5 and so on – Sergey Jul 8 '20 at 18:27
  • This method is incorrect for many valid ISO-8601 strings, including not handling milliseconds as mentioned by @dcrivelli. ISO 8601 allows a variety of formats, and includes milliseconds less than 0.1s. For example: 1997-07-16T19:20:30.09+01:00 < 1997-07-16T19:20:30.10+01:00 – audun Sep 17 '20 at 17:36
2

Old question, and I have some old code to contribute ;). I was using the date library mentioned here. While it works great, it comes at a performance cost. For most common cases this would be not really relevant. However, if you have for example a service parsing data like I do, it really does matter.

I was profiling my server application for performance optimization, and found that parsing an ISO timestamp using the date library was 3 times slower compared to parsing the whole (roughly 500 bytes) json document. In total parsing the timestamp accounted for about 4.8% of total CPU time.

On my quest to optimize this part, I did not find much with C++ that I would consider for a living product. And the code which I did consider further mostly had some dependencies (e.g. the ISO parser in CEPH looks ok and seems well tested).

In the end, I turned to good old C and stripped out some code from the SQLite date.c to make it work standalone. The difference:

date: 872ms

SQLite date.c: 54ms

(Profiled function weight of real life service application)

Here it is (all credits to SQLite):

The header file date_util.h

#include <stdint.h>
#include <stdbool.h>

#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C" {
#endif

    // Calculates time since epoch including milliseconds
    uint64_t ParseTimeToEpochMillis(const char *str, bool *error);

    // Creates an ISO timestamp with milliseconds from epoch with millis.
    // The buffer size (resultLen) for result must be at least 100 bytes.
    void TimeFromEpochMillis(uint64_t epochMillis, char *result, int resultLen, bool *error);

#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif

This is the C file date_util.c:

#include "_date.h"
#include <ctype.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdarg.h>
#include <stdarg.h>
#include <assert.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>


/*
 ** A structure for holding a single date and time.
 */
typedef struct DateTime DateTime;
struct DateTime {
    int64_t iJD;        /* The julian day number times 86400000 */
    int Y, M, D;        /* Year, month, and day */
    int h, m;           /* Hour and minutes */
    int tz;             /* Timezone offset in minutes */
    double s;           /* Seconds */
    char validJD;       /* True (1) if iJD is valid */
    char rawS;          /* Raw numeric value stored in s */
    char validYMD;      /* True (1) if Y,M,D are valid */
    char validHMS;      /* True (1) if h,m,s are valid */
    char validTZ;       /* True (1) if tz is valid */
    char tzSet;         /* Timezone was set explicitly */
    char isError;       /* An overflow has occurred */
};

/*
 ** Convert zDate into one or more integers according to the conversion
 ** specifier zFormat.
 **
 ** zFormat[] contains 4 characters for each integer converted, except for
 ** the last integer which is specified by three characters.  The meaning
 ** of a four-character format specifiers ABCD is:
 **
 **    A:   number of digits to convert.  Always "2" or "4".
 **    B:   minimum value.  Always "0" or "1".
 **    C:   maximum value, decoded as:
 **           a:  12
 **           b:  14
 **           c:  24
 **           d:  31
 **           e:  59
 **           f:  9999
 **    D:   the separator character, or \000 to indicate this is the
 **         last number to convert.
 **
 ** Example:  To translate an ISO-8601 date YYYY-MM-DD, the format would
 ** be "40f-21a-20c".  The "40f-" indicates the 4-digit year followed by "-".
 ** The "21a-" indicates the 2-digit month followed by "-".  The "20c" indicates
 ** the 2-digit day which is the last integer in the set.
 **
 ** The function returns the number of successful conversions.
 */
static int GetDigits(const char *zDate, const char *zFormat, ...){
    /* The aMx[] array translates the 3rd character of each format
     ** spec into a max size:    a   b   c   d   e     f */
    static const uint16_t aMx[] = { 12, 14, 24, 31, 59, 9999 };
    va_list ap;
    int cnt = 0;
    char nextC;
    va_start(ap, zFormat);
    do{
        char N = zFormat[0] - '0';
        char min = zFormat[1] - '0';
        int val = 0;
        uint16_t max;

        assert( zFormat[2]>='a' && zFormat[2]<='f' );
        max = aMx[zFormat[2] - 'a'];
        nextC = zFormat[3];
        val = 0;
        while( N-- ){
            if( !isdigit(*zDate) ){
                goto end_getDigits;
            }
            val = val*10 + *zDate - '0';
            zDate++;
        }
        if( val<(int)min || val>(int)max || (nextC!=0 && nextC!=*zDate) ){
            goto end_getDigits;
        }
        *va_arg(ap,int*) = val;
        zDate++;
        cnt++;
        zFormat += 4;
    }while( nextC );
end_getDigits:
    va_end(ap);
    return cnt;
}

/*
 ** Parse a timezone extension on the end of a date-time.
 ** The extension is of the form:
 **
 **        (+/-)HH:MM
 **
 ** Or the "zulu" notation:
 **
 **        Z
 **
 ** If the parse is successful, write the number of minutes
 ** of change in p->tz and return 0.  If a parser error occurs,
 ** return non-zero.
 **
 ** A missing specifier is not considered an error.
 */
static int ParseTimezone(const char *zDate, DateTime *p){
    int sgn = 0;
    int nHr, nMn;
    int c;
    while( isspace(*zDate) ){ zDate++; }
    p->tz = 0;
    c = *zDate;
    if( c=='-' ){
        sgn = -1;
    }else if( c=='+' ){
        sgn = +1;
    }else if( c=='Z' || c=='z' ){
        zDate++;
        goto zulu_time;
    }else{
        return c!=0;
    }
    zDate++;
    if( GetDigits(zDate, "20b:20e", &nHr, &nMn)!=2 ){
        return 1;
    }
    zDate += 5;
    p->tz = sgn*(nMn + nHr*60);
zulu_time:
    while( isspace(*zDate) ){ zDate++; }
    p->tzSet = 1;
    return *zDate!=0;
}

/*
 ** Parse times of the form HH:MM or HH:MM:SS or HH:MM:SS.FFFF.
 ** The HH, MM, and SS must each be exactly 2 digits.  The
 ** fractional seconds FFFF can be one or more digits.
 **
 ** Return 1 if there is a parsing error and 0 on success.
 */
static int ParseHhMmSs(const char *zDate, DateTime *p){
    int h, m, s;
    double ms = 0.0;
    if( GetDigits(zDate, "20c:20e", &h, &m)!=2 ){
        return 1;
    }
    zDate += 5;
    if( *zDate==':' ){
        zDate++;
        if( GetDigits(zDate, "20e", &s)!=1 ){
            return 1;
        }
        zDate += 2;
        if( *zDate=='.' && isdigit(zDate[1]) ){
            double rScale = 1.0;
            zDate++;
            while( isdigit(*zDate) ){
                ms = ms*10.0 + *zDate - '0';
                rScale *= 10.0;
                zDate++;
            }
            ms /= rScale;
        }
    }else{
        s = 0;
    }
    p->validJD = 0;
    p->rawS = 0;
    p->validHMS = 1;
    p->h = h;
    p->m = m;
    p->s = s + ms;
    if( ParseTimezone(zDate, p) ) return 1;
    p->validTZ = (p->tz!=0)?1:0;
    return 0;
}

/*
 ** Put the DateTime object into its error state.
 */
static void DatetimeError(DateTime *p){
    memset(p, 0, sizeof(*p));
    p->isError = 1;
}

/*
 ** Convert from YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS to julian day.  We always assume
 ** that the YYYY-MM-DD is according to the Gregorian calendar.
 **
 ** Reference:  Meeus page 61
 */
static void ComputeJD(DateTime *p){
    int Y, M, D, A, B, X1, X2;

    if( p->validJD ) return;
    if( p->validYMD ){
        Y = p->Y;
        M = p->M;
        D = p->D;
    }else{
        Y = 2000;  /* If no YMD specified, assume 2000-Jan-01 */
        M = 1;
        D = 1;
    }
    if( Y<-4713 || Y>9999 || p->rawS ){
        DatetimeError(p);
        return;
    }
    if( M<=2 ){
        Y--;
        M += 12;
    }
    A = Y/100;
    B = 2 - A + (A/4);
    X1 = 36525*(Y+4716)/100;
    X2 = 306001*(M+1)/10000;
    p->iJD = (int64_t)((X1 + X2 + D + B - 1524.5 ) * 86400000);
    p->validJD = 1;
    if( p->validHMS ){
        p->iJD += p->h*3600000 + p->m*60000 + (int64_t)(p->s*1000);
        if( p->validTZ ){
            p->iJD -= p->tz*60000;
            p->validYMD = 0;
            p->validHMS = 0;
            p->validTZ = 0;
        }
    }
}

/*
 ** Parse dates of the form
 **
 **     YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS.FFF
 **     YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS
 **     YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM
 **     YYYY-MM-DD
 **
 ** Write the result into the DateTime structure and return 0
 ** on success and 1 if the input string is not a well-formed
 ** date.
 */
static int ParseYyyyMmDd(const char *zDate, DateTime *p){
    int Y, M, D, neg;

    if( zDate[0]=='-' ){
        zDate++;
        neg = 1;
    }else{
        neg = 0;
    }
    if( GetDigits(zDate, "40f-21a-21d", &Y, &M, &D)!=3 ){
        return 1;
    }
    zDate += 10;
    while( isspace(*zDate) || 'T'==*(uint8_t*)zDate ){ zDate++; }
    if( ParseHhMmSs(zDate, p)==0 ){
        /* We got the time */
    }else if( *zDate==0 ){
        p->validHMS = 0;
    }else{
        return 1;
    }
    p->validJD = 0;
    p->validYMD = 1;
    p->Y = neg ? -Y : Y;
    p->M = M;
    p->D = D;
    if( p->validTZ ){
        ComputeJD(p);
    }
    return 0;
}

/* The julian day number for 9999-12-31 23:59:59.999 is 5373484.4999999.
 ** Multiplying this by 86400000 gives 464269060799999 as the maximum value
 ** for DateTime.iJD.
 **
 ** But some older compilers (ex: gcc 4.2.1 on older Macs) cannot deal with
 ** such a large integer literal, so we have to encode it.
 */
#define INT_464269060799999  ((((int64_t)0x1a640)<<32)|0x1072fdff)

/*
 ** Return TRUE if the given julian day number is within range.
 **
 ** The input is the JulianDay times 86400000.
 */
static int ValidJulianDay(int64_t iJD){
    return iJD>=0 && iJD<=INT_464269060799999;
}

/*
 ** Compute the Year, Month, and Day from the julian day number.
 */
static void ComputeYMD(DateTime *p){
    int Z, A, B, C, D, E, X1;
    if( p->validYMD ) return;
    if( !p->validJD ){
        p->Y = 2000;
        p->M = 1;
        p->D = 1;
    }else if( !ValidJulianDay(p->iJD) ){
        DatetimeError(p);
        return;
    }else{
        Z = (int)((p->iJD + 43200000)/86400000);
        A = (int)((Z - 1867216.25)/36524.25);
        A = Z + 1 + A - (A/4);
        B = A + 1524;
        C = (int)((B - 122.1)/365.25);
        D = (36525*(C&32767))/100;
        E = (int)((B-D)/30.6001);
        X1 = (int)(30.6001*E);
        p->D = B - D - X1;
        p->M = E<14 ? E-1 : E-13;
        p->Y = p->M>2 ? C - 4716 : C - 4715;
    }
    p->validYMD = 1;
}

/*
 ** Compute the Hour, Minute, and Seconds from the julian day number.
 */
static void ComputeHMS(DateTime *p){
    int s;
    if( p->validHMS ) return;
    ComputeJD(p);
    s = (int)((p->iJD + 43200000) % 86400000);
    p->s = s/1000.0;
    s = (int)p->s;
    p->s -= s;
    p->h = s/3600;
    s -= p->h*3600;
    p->m = s/60;
    p->s += s - p->m*60;
    p->rawS = 0;
    p->validHMS = 1;
}

/*
 ** Compute both YMD and HMS
 */
static void ComputeYMD_HMS(DateTime *p){
    ComputeYMD(p);
    ComputeHMS(p);
}

/*
 ** Input "r" is a numeric quantity which might be a julian day number,
 ** or the number of seconds since 1970.  If the value if r is within
 ** range of a julian day number, install it as such and set validJD.
 ** If the value is a valid unix timestamp, put it in p->s and set p->rawS.
 */
static void SetRawDateNumber(DateTime *p, double r){
    p->s = r;
    p->rawS = 1;
    if( r>=0.0 && r<5373484.5 ){
        p->iJD = (int64_t)(r*86400000.0 + 0.5);
        p->validJD = 1;
    }
}

/*
 ** Clear the YMD and HMS and the TZ
 */
static void ClearYMD_HMS_TZ(DateTime *p){
    p->validYMD = 0;
    p->validHMS = 0;
    p->validTZ = 0;
}

// modified methods to only calculate for and back between epoch and iso timestamp with millis

uint64_t ParseTimeToEpochMillis(const char *str, bool *error) {
    assert(str);
    assert(error);
    *error = false;
    DateTime dateTime;

    int res = ParseYyyyMmDd(str, &dateTime);
    if (res) {
        *error = true;
        return 0;
    }

    ComputeJD(&dateTime);
    ComputeYMD_HMS(&dateTime);

    // get fraction (millis of a full second): 24.355 => 355
    int millis = (dateTime.s - (int)(dateTime.s)) * 1000;
    uint64_t epoch = (int64_t)(dateTime.iJD/1000 - 21086676*(int64_t)10000) * 1000 + millis;

    return epoch;
}

void TimeFromEpochMillis(uint64_t epochMillis, char *result, int resultLen, bool *error) {
    assert(resultLen >= 100);
    assert(result);
    assert(error);

    int64_t seconds = epochMillis / 1000;
    int millis = epochMillis - seconds * 1000;
    DateTime x;

    *error = false;
    memset(&x, 0, sizeof(x));
    SetRawDateNumber(&x, seconds);

    /*
     **    unixepoch
     **
     ** Treat the current value of p->s as the number of
     ** seconds since 1970.  Convert to a real julian day number.
     */
    {
        double r = x.s*1000.0 + 210866760000000.0;
        if( r>=0.0 && r<464269060800000.0 ){
            ClearYMD_HMS_TZ(&x);
            x.iJD = (int64_t)r;
            x.validJD = 1;
            x.rawS = 0;
        }

        ComputeJD(&x);
        if( x.isError || !ValidJulianDay(x.iJD) ) {
            *error = true;
        }
    }

    ComputeYMD_HMS(&x);
    snprintf(result, resultLen, "%04d-%02d-%02dT%02d:%02d:%02d.%03dZ",
             x.Y, x.M, x.D, x.h, x.m, (int)(x.s), millis);
}

These two helper methods simply convert to and from a timestamp in with milliseconds. Setting a tm struct from the DateTime should be obvious.

Example usage:

// Calculate milliseconds since epoch
std::string timeStamp = "2019-09-02T22:02:24.355Z";
bool error;
uint64_t time = ParseTimeToEpochMillis(timeStamp.c_str(), &error);

// Get ISO timestamp with milliseconds component from epoch in milliseconds.
// Multiple by 1000 in case you have a standard epoch in seconds)
uint64_t epochMillis = 1567461744355; // == "2019-09-02T22:02:24.355Z"
char result[100] = {0};
TimeFromEpochMillis(epochMillis, result, sizeof(result), &error);
std::string resultStr(result); // == "2019-09-02T22:02:24.355Z"
5
  • This code can lose a millisecond when converting from ISO format to milliseconds. In ParseTimeToEpochMillis this line: int millis = (dateTime.s - (int)(dateTime.s)) * 1000; should read int millis = (int)(dateTime.s * 1000 + 0.5) % 1000; – asthomas Nov 20 '20 at 11:51
  • Thanks for the catch. I think this would be better (avoiding a modulo and adding 0.5 which would also lead to wrong results in some situations): double secondsInt; modf(x.s, &secondsInt); int64_t milliSeconds = (int64_t)(x.s * 1000) - (int64_t)(secondsInt * 1000); – benjist Nov 22 '20 at 12:51
  • Now I feel silly. If millis is >= 995 then my fix will lose a whole second. The correct answer is int millis = dateTime.iJD % 1000; and then fix the computation for iJD, which loses a millisecond in ComputeJD. Add a 0.5 rounding in this line: p->iJD += p->h*3600000 + p->m*60000 + (int64_t)(p->s*1000 + 0.5); Any fix that computes millis based on rounding DateTime.s will fail if iJD is off by one in the next line. – asthomas Nov 23 '20 at 22:15
  • Can you give an example which fails? I do not see any false rounding with my additional code snippet provided. I think adding 0.5 millis can lead to issues in other cases. – benjist Nov 24 '20 at 18:16
  • I wrote a program that starts from time(NULL) * 1000 and increments by 1 millisecond, converting to string and back to milliseconds. In the first 10 values, 2 failed: 1606821664004 => 2020-12-01T11:21:04.004Z => 1606821664003 and 1606821664007 => 2020-12-01T11:21:04.007Z => 1606821664006. Can you give an example where rounding by adding 0.5 millis fails? That is standard practice for rounding float to int. Even with rounding p->iJD, neither the original nor your modification works over all values. – asthomas Dec 1 '20 at 11:37
0

While I went the sscanf() path at first, after switching my IDE to CLion, it suggested the use of std::strtol() function to replace sscanf().

Remember that this is just an example of achieving the same result as the sscanf() version. It's not meant to be shorter, universal and correct in every way, but to point everyone in the "pure C++ solution" direction. It's based on the timestamp strings I receive from an API and is not yet universal (my case needs handling the YYYY-MM-DDTHH:mm:ss.sssZ format), it could be easily modified to handle different ones.

Before posting the code, there's one thing that needs to be done before using std::strtol(): cleaning up the string itself, so removing any non-digit markers ("-", ":", "T", "Z", "."), because without it std::strtol() will parse the numbers the wrong way (you might end up with negative month or day values without it).

This little snippet takes a ISO-8601 string (the format I needed, as mentioned above) and converts it into a std::time_t result, representing the epoch time in milliseconds. From here it's quite easy to go into std::chrono-type objects.

std::time_t parseISO8601(const std::string &input)
{
    // prepare the data output placeholders
    struct std::tm time = {0};
    int millis;

    // string cleaning for strtol() - this could be made cleaner, but for the sake of the example itself...
    std::string cleanInput = input
        .replace(4, 1, 1, ' ')
        .replace(7, 1, 1, ' ')
        .replace(10, 1, 1, ' ')
        .replace(13, 1, 1, ' ')
        .replace(16, 1, 1, ' ')
        .replace(19, 1, 1, ' ');

    // pointers for std::strtol()
    const char* timestamp = cleanInput.c_str();
    // last parsing end position - it's where strtol finished parsing the last number found
    char* endPointer;
    // the casts aren't necessary, but I just wanted CLion to be quiet ;)
    // first parse - start with the timestamp string, give endPointer the position after the found number
    time.tm_year = (int) std::strtol(timestamp, &endPointer, 10) - 1900;
    // next parses - use endPointer instead of timestamp (skip the part, that's already parsed)
    time.tm_mon = (int) std::strtol(endPointer, &endPointer, 10) - 1;
    time.tm_mday = (int) std::strtol(endPointer, &endPointer, 10);
    time.tm_hour = (int) std::strtol(endPointer, &endPointer, 10);
    time.tm_min = (int) std::strtol(endPointer, &endPointer, 10);
    time.tm_sec = (int) std::strtol(endPointer, &endPointer, 10);
    millis = (int) std::strtol(endPointer, &endPointer, 10);

    // convert the tm struct into time_t and then from seconds to milliseconds
    return std::mktime(&time) * 1000 + millis;
}

Not the cleanest and most universal, but gets the job done without resorting to C-style functions like sscanf().

6
  • 1
    std::mktime will treat tm structure as it was local time while ISO 8601 uses UTC time in most of the cases ('Z' time zone) – Sergey Apr 20 '18 at 12:11
  • 1
    @Sergey Your answer is a lot cleaner. :) I posted mine as an example of doing this without C-style functions. It really has a lot of room for improvement. ;) – TeHMoroS Apr 21 '18 at 17:24
  • what happens if ms are like .00123? are they managed like .123? – david Jul 7 '20 at 13:22
  • 1
    @dcrivelli Technically values like .00123 aren't milliseconds anymore (10^-3). In milliseconds the .00123 part is 1.23 millisecond. These are microseconds (10^-6) and the proper value should be 1230 µs. Anyway the example I've placed above was crude, simple and handling only one, specific format (it doesn't handle units other than milliseconds at the end and only handles the UTC timezone). – TeHMoroS Jul 8 '20 at 21:28
  • @audun It was more of an example of not using scanf() function, but not a proper solution. At the time of writting it handled the data I had nicely, so I didn't bother to debug it (it was a part of a little side project, nothing serious). I would probably go with a battle-tested library or solution when using it for something serious. – TeHMoroS Sep 18 '20 at 18:41
-1

There is a from_iso_string and from_iso_extended_string in Boost::DateTime library:

#include <boost/date_time/posix_time/posix_time.hpp>

using namespace boost::posix_time;

// signature
ptime from_iso_string(std::string)
ptime from_iso_extended_string(std::string)

// examples
std::string ts("20020131T235959");
ptime t1(from_iso_string(ts))
std::string ts("2020-01-31T23:59:59.123");
ptime t2(from_iso_extended_string(ts))

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