0

Suppose I have a class

template
<
  typename ValType,
  typename SizeType        = size_t,
  typename ReservePolitics = double_size
>
class buffer {
public:

    buffer();
    buffer(dimension const& dim);

    // lots of functions ...

};

with functions defined outside from it:

template
  <
    typename ValType,
    typename SizeType        = size_t,
    typename ReservePolitics = double_size
  >
buffer<ValType, SizeType, ReservePolitics>::
  buffer() : _Cap(), _Ptr(nullptr), _ResPol() {}

template
  <
    typename ValType,
    typename SizeType        = size_t,
    typename ReservePolitics = double_size
  >
buffer<ValType, SizeType, ReservePolitics>::
  buffer(dimension const& dim) :
    _Cap(), _Ptr(nullptr), _ResPol() { /*...*/ }

// lots of definitions ..

These definitions are hard to read. But, I can define several macroses

#define BUFFHEADER\
  template\
  <\
    typename ValType,\
    typename SizeType      = size_t,\
    typename ReservePolitics = double_size>\
  >

#define BUFFINSTANCE buffer<ValType, SizeType, ReservePolitics>

#define BUFFNAMESPACE BUFFINSTANCE::

which helps me to reduce that definitions:

BUFFHEADER BUFFNAMESPACE
  buffer() : _Cap(), _Ptr(nullptr), _ResPol() {}

BUFFHEADER BUFFNAMESPACE
  buffer(dimension const& dim) :
    _Cap(), _Ptr(nullptr), _ResPol() { /* ... */ }

Are there reasons to not do that and type hole declaration with template<... each time?

  • 2
    not sure it's even valid to repeat template parameter defaults in every defintion, but anyway don't do it – Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 12 '14 at 21:29
  • 3
    You need to define the methods in the header file otherwise you will get linker errors. So just do it in the class definition and you don't have this problem. Why are you defining the methods outside the class? – clcto Nov 12 '14 at 21:31
  • 6
    Reasons not to do something include making your code harder to read, harder to maintain, less reusable, and more prone to errors. Reasons to do something include making your code easier to read, easier to maintain, more reusable, and less prone to errors. So think about what you are doing, figure out if it is actually helping you, then make your own decision. Do what makes the most sense for your situation. – Jason C Nov 12 '14 at 21:38
  • 1
    Adding to @JasonC's excellent comment, I find the macros in your example to detract from readability, even though they're much simpler than the actual template boilerplate. I'd just use copy/paste instead. – Mark Ransom Nov 12 '14 at 21:45
  • 2
    I see now it's opinion-based question. Anyway, I needed in experienced opinion about that. Thanks! – wowofbob Nov 12 '14 at 21:54
3

These macros should work fine. Still, I advise against using them.

Okay, the code is more concise and is probably easier to read for you. However, it will confusing for anyone else who will read your code. Even if you don't want show code anyone, you shouldn't use macros. You will learn how read template code if you give yourself some time. Macros only impede you in this.

Better way to make your code clearer is change style of line breaks. If you will eliminate at least a few lines, the code will be more clear, because you will be able see more code at once. You don't need new line for every bracket.

Moreover, macros are freakish. Generally you shouldn't use their. @Adrian Maire wrote more about it in the post above.

| improve this answer | |
  • I guess somebody wouldn't confused too match if he'll read header file with macros used and defined only in that header. When big templates are written shorter they looks ugly. – wowofbob Nov 12 '14 at 22:40
  • 2
    @wowofbob I know from experience that hardly anyone reads the entire file. Usually just read the definitions of a single function. Of course, everyone can find a macro. They are not difficult to understand, but that's not the point. Just easier to read the familiar structure of the code. No need to even wonder if their meaning. Besides, there is still the argument that you should learn to read the macro. – NO_NAME Nov 12 '14 at 22:46
  • 1
    @wowofbob "they looks ugly" I agree, but this is the price of using macros. – NO_NAME Nov 12 '14 at 22:51
  • So, the point is, if somebody wants to read and understand what I did, he should learn a syntax I did using macros. That may be confusing. I see it now. – wowofbob Nov 12 '14 at 22:52
2

Macros is a powerful tool, but it may carry to terribly obscure (hard to understand and debug) code.

A Macro may seem to work correctly and fail in other situations, that is why it is usually necessary to write them with special rules (using bracket and such).

Most uses of Macro have a better, safer and equivalent way to make the same.

Macros help to make code shorter, but that usually does not mean easier to read nor to compile. Shorter != Better

That is why macros are one of those techniques like goto/labels, break/continue, return abuse, etc. that programmers tends to ban.

Macros may still be useful for some very specific purposes, but should be avoided if there is not a very good reason to use them. That should answer your question.

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