0

Say I have three buttons in a row, with the end one being a 'deadly' button. Is there a way I can click on button 1, and it would tell me that it's 2 elements away from the 'deadly' button? Or click on button 2, which would tell me it's once space away from number 3, the 'deadly' button.

I'm not sure I've explained this very well, so I'll link an example of the setup.

I'm hoping do something similar to the Minesweeper way of detecting the 'mines'.

HTML

<table>
    <tr>
        <td><button id="1">Button 1</button></td>
        <td><button id="2">Button 2</button></td>
        <td><button id="3">Button 3</button></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td><button id="4">Button 4</button></td>
        <td><button id="deadly">Button 5</button></td>
        <td><button id="6">Button 6</button></td>
    </tr>  
    <tr>
        <td><button id="7">Button 7</button></td>
        <td><button id="8">Button 8</button></td>
        <td><button id="9">Button 9</button></td>
    </tr> 
</table>  

I'm currently using JQuery, so any solution that uses it will still work for me.

FIDDLE

6
  • I'd suggest using something like this Fiddle – Jonathan Nov 12 '14 at 22:56
  • @SterlingArcher to create the Minefield, instead of tables and buttons... – Jonathan Nov 12 '14 at 22:59
  • Oh, I thought that fiddle somehow answered the detection question. Didn't realize you were advertising a map builder. – Sterling Archer Nov 12 '14 at 23:01
  • But, just a note, MineSweeper tells you how many 'deadly things' are in the cells surrounding the one you clicked; not how far away the 'deadly things' are... – David says reinstate Monica Nov 12 '14 at 23:05
  • This second Fiddle would be a decent starting point for a Minesweeper game I guess. – Jonathan Nov 12 '14 at 23:09
1

At its simplest, you can use the cellIndex property of the <td> element within which the <button> is enclosed:

$('button').click(function(e){
    e.preventDefault();
    var self = $(this),
        cellIndex = self.closest('td').prop('cellIndex'),
        lastCell = self.closest('tr').find('td:last-child').prop('cellIndex'),
        delta = Math.abs(lastCell - cellIndex);
    console.log( delta + (delta === 1 ? ' cell' : ' cells') + ' away from deadly cell');
});

JS Fiddle demo.

References:

4
  • This solution is the one I understand better, but (after I tweaked it to see what was where) I found that it shows all of the last column as deadly (puu.sh/cOlGz/5ae955c715.png) any advice to fix this? – Asteria Nov 12 '14 at 23:08
  • But isn't that what you said: "I have three buttons in a row, with the end one being a 'deadly' button"? What result do you want if I click on button4, and button9? – David says reinstate Monica Nov 12 '14 at 23:09
  • This is all just for an example, but I appreciate your help. If the 'deadly' button was, say, button 6, 4 would say 2 cells and 9 would say 1, as they are varying lengths away. – Asteria Nov 12 '14 at 23:17
  • And button1 would be 2 horizontally, and 1 vertically; so...you'd want the (sort of) hypotenuse distance of 2 cells away? Or just the largest number (horizontal or vertical; in the above case that's obviously the same distance)? – David says reinstate Monica Nov 12 '14 at 23:20
0

Using jQuery:

$("button").click(function() {
    var myrow = $(this).parent().index();
    var mycol = $(this).index();
    var deadly = $("#deadly");
    var deadly_row = deadly.parent().index();
    var deadly_col = deadly.index();
    var x_dist = Math.abs(mycol - deadly_col);
    var y_dist = Math.abs(myrow - deadly_row);
    // Do what you want with x_dist and y_dist
});
0
0

This code randomly determines the deadly square and then checks onclick. First it check the coordinates to see if they match, if not then it determines the distance. Here I simply pass coordinates with the function call. you can dynamicallygrow your table if you want to. The added benefit of this approach is that you cannot just view the source and find out which button holds the "deadly"

<script>
    var DeadlyX = Math.floor((Math.random() * 3) + 1);
    var DeadlyY = Math.floor((Math.random() * 3) + 1);


    function amIDeadly(x, y) {

        var r = "checking";
        if ((x == DeadlyX) && (y == DeadlyY)) {
            r = "found the deadly!";
        }
        else {
            var dx = x - DeadlyX;
            var dy = y - DeadlyY;
            var hyp = dx*dx + dy*dy;
            hyp = Math.sqrt(hyp);
            hyp = Math.floor(hyp);
            r = "you are " + hyp + " from the deadly";
        }
        document.getElementById("infobox").value = r;

    }
</script>
<table>
    <tr>
        <td>
            <button id="1" onclick="amIDeadly(1,1);">Button 1</button>
        </td>
        <td>
            <button id="2" onclick="amIDeadly(1,2);">Button 2</button>
        </td>
        <td>
            <button id="3" onclick="amIDeadly(1,3);">Button 3</button>
        </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>
            <button id="4" onclick="amIDeadly(2,1);">Button 4</button>
        </td>
        <td>
            <button id="5" onclick="amIDeadly(2,2);">Button 5</button>
        </td>
        <td>
            <button id="6" onclick="amIDeadly(2,3);">Button 6</button>
        </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>
            <button id="7" onclick="amIDeadly(3,1);">Button 7</button>
        </td>
        <td>
            <button id="8" onclick="amIDeadly(3,2);">Button 8</button>
        </td>
        <td>
            <button id="9" onclick="amIDeadly(3,3);">Button 9</button>
        </td>
    </tr>
</table>
<br/>
<br/>
<input id="infobox" />

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.