58

Is is wrong to have a return statement in a catch block? What are the alternatives?
i.e:

public bool SomeFunction()
{
    try
    {
        //somecode
        return true;
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
        MessageBox.Show(ex.message);
        return false;
    }

}

10 Answers 10

39

You can return normally from catch block. It's normally good functional code.

20

One alternative would be to store the return value in a temporary variable:

public bool SomeFunction()
{
    bool success = true;
    try
    {
        //somecode
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
        MessageBox.Show(ex.message);
        success = false;
    }

    return success;
}

But personally, I find the way you've written it (with one catch-all catch statement) to be more readable. On the other hand, if you are expecting a specific exception and you might have multiple paths to return success or not...

try
{
    DoTheImportantThing();
    DoTheOtherThingThatMightFailButWeDontCare();
}
catch (DontCareAboutItException ex)
{
    log.Info(ex);
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    log.Error(ex);
    return false;
}

return true;

Then in my opinion you're best off pushing the return statements as close to the end as possible.

As a side note, depending on the application, consider logging the exceptions you catch rather than just showing them to the user. Logged exceptions are a lot more reliable than user's recounts of what happened.

11

If in the try block there's already a return statement I would probably put the other return at the end of the function:

try
{
    //somecode
    return true;
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
    MessageBox.Show(ex.message);
}
return false;

And this in order to avoid multiple returns if multiple exceptions need to be handled.

  • 1
    If I follow the pattern of putting return inside catch, then compiler will remind me with error if in case somehow during refactoring I accidently delete my return statement inside the try. But if I keep return after the catch then the code will compile and it might end up in prod. – Unnie Nov 15 '17 at 18:07
9

It's ok, just have in mind, that some code may executed after return instruction (return value ll be cashed).

    try
    {
        return;
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
        return;
    }
    finally
    {
        //some code
    }
8
public bool SomeFunction()
{
    try
    {
        //somecode
        return true;
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
        MessageBox.Show(ex.message);
    }
    return false;
}

Personally I put the return statement at the bottom of the method instead of in the catch-block. But both are fine. It's all about readability (subjective) and guidelines in your organization.

2

It isn't wrong, but if you used a resource, generally finally block is used to close it, instead of calling the close method twice, too. In that case, you may choose to use the return statement after the finally block.

  • 6
    finally would still execute even with a return in the try block. – fearofawhackplanet Apr 22 '10 at 11:38
  • 1
    In this case return statement after finally block will just cause confusion. It will work, but it is a good practice not to complicate your code (too much). – Piotr Justyna Apr 22 '10 at 11:52
2

Yes, it's perfectly normal.

Don't forget, that you can also use finally block to be executed after return.

  • 3
    And therefore the code would be hard to read since code is executing after the return. – Romain Hippeau Apr 22 '10 at 11:56
  • 1
    Putting a return in a catch block might be hard to read because you expect the return to bypass the finally statement. The same could be said of putting a return block in the try block. Return usually means "all execution in the method stops and control passes back to the caller" while the finally block always runs when leaving the try/catch, so predicting which will take precedence it not easy. – Trisped Jan 12 '16 at 23:43
0

Makes perfect sense to me for a function which returns true on success and false on failure. I hope there is nothing wrong with it - I do it all the time :)

0

The primary purpose of a catch block is to provide a place where one can proceed an exceptional situation which occurred in a try block. So you caught an exception, proceeded it... and returned from a method. If the caller method does not care about the exception, this is absolutely normal.

0

You can add a return in the catch block. You explicitly know that your code will return and continue execution instead of halting at the catch block.

try{
    //do something
}
catch{
    //error handling
    return;
}

Instead of having a lot of try-catch blocks in your code that can get confusing and just cause a mess in your code, it's better handle everything in your noe try catch and just check what the error returned was.

try{
    //do something
}
catch (Exception as err){
    if (err == "IOException"){
         //handle exception
    else if (err.indexOf("TypeError"){
         //handle exception
    }
}

These are two ways of checking what type the exception was so you can display a message accordingly. You can also just catch specific exceptions if you wanted so instead of Exception as err you can do catch IOException, ...

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