I'm using DynamoDB local for unit testing. It's not bad, but has some drawbacks. Specifically:

  • You have to somehow start the server before your tests run
  • The server isn't started and stopped before each test so tests become inter-dependent unless you add code to delete all tables, etc. after each test
  • All developers need to have it installed

What I want to do is something like put the DynamoDB local jar, and the other jars upon which it depends, in my test/resources directory (I'm writing Java). Then before each test I'd start it up, running with -inMemory, and after the test I'd stop it. That way anyone pulling down the git repo gets a copy of everything they need to run the tests and each test is independent of the others.

I have found a way to make this work, but it's ugly, so I'm looking for alternatives. The solution I have is to put a .zip file of the DynamoDB local stuff in test/resources, then in an @Before method, I'd extract it to some temporary directory and start a new java process to execute it. That works, but it's ugly and has some drawbacks:

  • Everyone needs the java executable on their $PATH
  • I have to unpack a zip to the local disk. Using local disk is often dicey for testing, especially with continuous builds and such.
  • I have to spawn a process and wait for it to start for each unit test, and then kill that process after each test. Besides being slow, the potential for left-over processes seems ugly.

It seems like there should be an easier way. DynamoDB Local is, after all, just Java code. Can't I somehow ask the JVM to fork itself and look inside the resources to build a classpath? Or, even better, can't I just call the main method of DynamoDb Local from some other thread so this all happens in a single process? Any ideas?

PS: I am aware of Alternator, but it appears to have other drawbacks so I'm inclined to stick with Amazon's supported solution if I can make it work.

  • As you say that you want to write unit tests - not integration tests - why not use a mock? Something like DynamoDB-mock. This one allows to be encapsulated as library. – cheffe Nov 13 '14 at 10:05
  • 1
    @cheffe, thanks for the thought. That appears to be exactly what I want, but it's Python, not Java so I'd still have to spawn an external executable from my tests just like I'm doing with DynamoDB Local (and make sure all users had the right version of Python installed, had that on their $PATH, etc.). I'm looking for something very much like that, but in Java. Note that creating my own mock would be a huge task since the Dynamo API is pretty rich. – Oliver Dain Nov 13 '14 at 17:57

In order to use DynamoDBLocal you need to follow these steps.

  1. Get Direct DynamoDBLocal Dependency
  2. Get Native SQLite4Java dependencies
  3. Set sqlite4java.library.path to show native libraries

1. Get Direct DynamoDBLocal Dependency

This one is the easy one. You need this repository as explained in AWS Forums.

<!--Dependency:-->
<dependencies>
    <dependency>
        <groupId>com.amazonaws</groupId>
        <artifactId>DynamoDBLocal</artifactId>
        <version>1.11.0.1</version>
        <scope></scope>
    </dependency>
</dependencies>
<!--Custom repository:-->
<repositories>
    <repository>
        <id>dynamodb-local</id>
        <name>DynamoDB Local Release Repository</name>
        <url>https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/dynamodb-local/release</url>
    </repository>
</repositories>

2. Get Native SQLite4Java dependencies

If you do not add these dependencies, your tests will fail with 500 internal error.

First, add these dependencies:

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.almworks.sqlite4java</groupId>
    <artifactId>sqlite4java</artifactId>
    <version>1.0.392</version>
    <scope>test</scope>
</dependency>
<dependency>
    <groupId>com.almworks.sqlite4java</groupId>
    <artifactId>sqlite4java-win32-x86</artifactId>
    <version>1.0.392</version>
    <type>dll</type>
    <scope>test</scope>
</dependency>
<dependency>
    <groupId>com.almworks.sqlite4java</groupId>
    <artifactId>sqlite4java-win32-x64</artifactId>
    <version>1.0.392</version>
    <type>dll</type>
    <scope>test</scope>
</dependency>
<dependency>
    <groupId>com.almworks.sqlite4java</groupId>
    <artifactId>libsqlite4java-osx</artifactId>
    <version>1.0.392</version>
    <type>dylib</type>
    <scope>test</scope>
</dependency>
<dependency>
    <groupId>com.almworks.sqlite4java</groupId>
    <artifactId>libsqlite4java-linux-i386</artifactId>
    <version>1.0.392</version>
    <type>so</type>
    <scope>test</scope>
</dependency>
<dependency>
    <groupId>com.almworks.sqlite4java</groupId>
    <artifactId>libsqlite4java-linux-amd64</artifactId>
    <version>1.0.392</version>
    <type>so</type>
    <scope>test</scope>
</dependency>

Then, add this plugin to get native dependencies to specific folder:

<build>
    <plugins>
        <plugin>
            <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
            <artifactId>maven-dependency-plugin</artifactId>
            <version>2.10</version>
            <executions>
                <execution>
                    <id>copy</id>
                    <phase>test-compile</phase>
                    <goals>
                        <goal>copy-dependencies</goal>
                    </goals>
                    <configuration>
                        <includeScope>test</includeScope>
                        <includeTypes>so,dll,dylib</includeTypes>
                        <outputDirectory>${project.basedir}/native-libs</outputDirectory>
                    </configuration>
                </execution>
            </executions>
        </plugin>
    </plugins>
</build>

3. Set sqlite4java.library.path to show native libraries

As last step, you need to set sqlite4java.library.path system property to native-libs directory. It is OK to do that just before creating your local server.

System.setProperty("sqlite4java.library.path", "native-libs");

After these steps you can use DynamoDBLocal as you want. Here is a Junit rule that creates local server for that.

import com.amazonaws.auth.BasicAWSCredentials;
import com.amazonaws.services.dynamodbv2.AmazonDynamoDB;
import com.amazonaws.services.dynamodbv2.AmazonDynamoDBClient;
import com.amazonaws.services.dynamodbv2.local.main.ServerRunner;
import com.amazonaws.services.dynamodbv2.local.server.DynamoDBProxyServer;
import org.junit.rules.ExternalResource;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.net.ServerSocket;

/**
 * Creates a local DynamoDB instance for testing.
 */
public class LocalDynamoDBCreationRule extends ExternalResource {

    private DynamoDBProxyServer server;
    private AmazonDynamoDB amazonDynamoDB;

    public LocalDynamoDBCreationRule() {
        // This one should be copied during test-compile time. If project's basedir does not contains a folder
        // named 'native-libs' please try '$ mvn clean install' from command line first
        System.setProperty("sqlite4java.library.path", "native-libs");
    }

    @Override
    protected void before() throws Throwable {

        try {
            final String port = getAvailablePort();
            this.server = ServerRunner.createServerFromCommandLineArgs(new String[]{"-inMemory", "-port", port});
            server.start();
            amazonDynamoDB = new AmazonDynamoDBClient(new BasicAWSCredentials("access", "secret"));
            amazonDynamoDB.setEndpoint("http://localhost:" + port);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            throw new RuntimeException(e);
        }
    }

    @Override
    protected void after() {

        if (server == null) {
            return;
        }

        try {
            server.stop();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            throw new RuntimeException(e);
        }
    }

    public AmazonDynamoDB getAmazonDynamoDB() {
        return amazonDynamoDB;
    }

    private String getAvailablePort() {
        try (final ServerSocket serverSocket = new ServerSocket(0)) {
            return String.valueOf(serverSocket.getLocalPort());
        } catch (IOException e) {
            throw new RuntimeException("Available port was not found", e);
        }
    }
}

You can use this rule like this

@RunWith(JUnit4.class)
public class UserDAOImplTest {

    @ClassRule
    public static final LocalDynamoDBCreationRule dynamoDB = new LocalDynamoDBCreationRule();
}
  • 4
    I found that the DynamoDBLocal dependency automatically brought in sqlite4java and the extra dependencies didn't need to be specified manually. – Jeffery Grajkowski Aug 22 '16 at 18:08
  • @JefferyGrajkowski I tried that as well but I cannot make it working without native libraries. What is your DDB local version? Maybe they updated dependencies. – bhdrkn Aug 24 '16 at 17:12
  • 2
    I use com.amazonaws:DynamoDBLocal:1.+. I figured it was best to stay on latest because the service itself is also going to update whether I like it or not. That works out to 1.11.0 right now. – Jeffery Grajkowski Aug 25 '16 at 22:36
  • 1
    I tried this solution along with suggestions from @JefferyGrajkowski and it worked like a charm. Thanks. – Mingliang Liu Sep 20 '16 at 22:02
  • 1
    Very good answer. I would put the native-libs in target: <outputDirectory>${project.basedir}/native-libs</outputDirectory> and System.setProperty("sqlite4java.library.path", "target/native-libs"); – Bart Swennenhuis Sep 11 at 8:27

You can use DynamoDB Local as a Maven test dependency in your test code, as is shown in this announcement. You can run over HTTP:

import com.amazonaws.services.dynamodbv2.local.main.ServerRunner;
import com.amazonaws.services.dynamodbv2.local.server.DynamoDBProxyServer;

final String[] localArgs = { "-inMemory" };
DynamoDBProxyServer server = ServerRunner.createServerFromCommandLineArgs(localArgs);
server.start();
AmazonDynamoDB dynamodb = new AmazonDynamoDBClient();
dynamodb.setEndpoint("http://localhost:8000");
dynamodb.listTables();
server.stop();

You can also run in embedded mode:

import com.amazonaws.services.dynamodbv2.local.embedded.DynamoDBEmbedded;

AmazonDynamoDB dynamodb = DynamoDBEmbedded.create();
dynamodb.listTables();
  • 1
    For the first option using the ServerRunner it starts ok but as soon as I try to create a table, I get AmazonServiceException The request processing has failed because of an unknown error, exception or failure. (Service: AmazonDynamoDBv2; Status Code: 500; Error Code: InternalFailure; Request ID: ea0eff34-65e4-49d5-8ae9-3bfbfec9136e) – leonardoborges Aug 4 '15 at 1:50
  • 6
    For the Embedded version I get a NullPointerException from SQLLite in the initializeMetadataTables method. :( – leonardoborges Aug 4 '15 at 1:51
  • Make sure you provide the full path to sqlite4java JNI libraries as part of the -Dsqlite4java.library.path=/the/path/to/sqlite/for/java/jni/libraries system property. – Alexander Patrikalakis Aug 4 '15 at 1:52
  • Is that necessary when using the inMemory option? – leonardoborges Aug 4 '15 at 2:11
  • 4
    There doesn't seem to be any information about that in the official repository containing example code. – leonardoborges Aug 4 '15 at 2:18

This is a restating of bhdrkn's answer for Gradle users (his is based on Maven). It's still the same three steps:

  1. Get Direct DynamoDBLocal Dependency
  2. Get Native SQLite4Java dependencies
  3. Set sqlite4java.library.path to show native libraries

1. Get Direct DynamoDBLocal Dependency

Add to the dependencies section of your build.gradle file...

dependencies {
    testCompile "com.amazonaws:DynamoDBLocal:1.+"
}

2. Get Native SQLite4Java dependencies

The sqlite4java libraries will already be downloaded as a dependency of DynamoDBLocal, but the library files need to be copied to the right place. Add to your build.gradle file...

task copyNativeDeps(type: Copy) {
    from(configurations.compile + configurations.testCompile) {
        include '*.dll'
        include '*.dylib'
        include '*.so'
    }
    into 'build/libs'
}

3. Set sqlite4java.library.path to show native libraries

We need to tell Gradle to run copyNativeDeps for testing and tell sqlite4java where to find the files. Add to your build.gradle file...

test {
    dependsOn copyNativeDeps
    systemProperty "java.library.path", 'build/libs'
}
  • 1
    This worked for me. Seriously a life-saver thanks! – anataliocs May 25 '17 at 17:33
  • @Jeffery I am getting the below errors: testMapRtbUser STANDARD_ERROR 17:39:41.931 [DEBUG] [TestEventLogger] 2017-08-29 17:39:41.929:WARN:oejs.AbstractHttpConnection:/ 17:39:41.931 [DEBUG] [TestEventLogger] java.lang.NoSuchMethodError: com.amazon.dynamodb.grammar.DynamoDbExpressionParser.parseAttributeValuesMapKeys(Ljava/lang/String;Lorg/antlr/v4/runtime/ANTLRErrorListener;)V However, for the same test if I run it from Eclipse as a Junit tests it runs fine. It only when run by gradle as a test it fails. Later on this times out to be a timeout error the update operation. Help! – Roy Aug 30 '17 at 0:53
  • It sounds like a runtime classpath issue. That class and that method with that signature definitely exists in the latest version of the JAR. Try clearing everything that Gradle has cached and try again. – Jeffery Grajkowski Aug 31 '17 at 19:48
  • I followed this but I keep getting java.lang.RuntimeException: com.amazonaws.SdkClientException: Unable to execute HTTP request: The target server failed to respond when I run my tests. Any idea what am I doing wrong? – Red May 5 at 1:47
  • Have you managed to run and write user tests for DynamoDBLocal when starting it manually? Try writing the manual, easy thing first before automating. – Jeffery Grajkowski May 7 at 21:04

I have wrapped the answers above into two JUnit rules that does not require changes to the build script as the rules handles the native library stuff. I did this as I found that Idea did not like the Gradle/Maven solutions as it just went off and did its own thing anyhoos.

This means the steps are:

  • Get the AssortmentOfJUnitRules version 1.5.32 or above dependency
  • Get the Direct DynamoDBLocal dependency
  • Add the LocalDynamoDbRule or HttpDynamoDbRule to your JUnit test.

Maven:

<!--Dependency:-->
<dependencies>
    <dependency>
        <groupId>com.amazonaws</groupId>
        <artifactId>DynamoDBLocal</artifactId>
        <version>1.11.0.1</version>
        <scope>test</scope>
    </dependency>
    <dependency>
      <groupId>com.github.mlk</groupId>
      <artifactId>assortmentofjunitrules</artifactId>
      <version>1.5.36</version>
      <scope>test</scope>
    </dependency>
</dependencies>
<!--Custom repository:-->
<repositories>
    <repository>
        <id>dynamodb-local</id>
        <name>DynamoDB Local Release Repository</name>
        <url>https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/dynamodb-local/release</url>
    </repository>
</repositories>

Gradle:

repositories {
  mavenCentral()

   maven {
    url = "https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/dynamodb-local/release"
  }
}

dependencies {
    testCompile "com.github.mlk:assortmentofjunitrules:1.5.36"
    testCompile "com.amazonaws:DynamoDBLocal:1.+"
}

Code:

public class LocalDynamoDbRuleTest {
  @Rule
  public LocalDynamoDbRule ddb = new LocalDynamoDbRule();

  @Test
  public void test() {
    doDynamoStuff(ddb.getClient());
  }
}
  • THIS WORKS GOOD. – eold Nov 14 '17 at 15:06
  • I ran into an issue with this. I get a NPE in LocalDynamoDbRule.java:38 (DynamoDBEmbedded.create() returns null). Before that, the native SQLite part logs: com.almworks.sqlite4java.SQLiteException: [-91] cannot load library: com.almworks.sqlite4java.SQLiteException: [-91] sqlite4java cannot find native library. I use com.github.mlk:DynamoDBLocal:1.11.119 and com.github.mlk:assortmentofjunitrules:1.5.39. Shouldn't the LocalDynamoDbRule take care of all the native SQLite stuff? – scho Jul 16 at 17:04
  • Here is the complete stacktrace of the error I get. – scho Jul 16 at 17:16
  • It should be handling the native library stuff for you yes. I'll look into it. Thanks – Michael Lloyd Lee mlk Jul 17 at 18:08
  • Could you send me a snipped of your POM/gradle/whatever as well please? Thanks. – Michael Lloyd Lee mlk Jul 18 at 9:41

For unit testing at work I use Mockito, then just mock the AmazonDynamoDBClient. then mock out the returns using when. like the following:

when(mockAmazonDynamoDBClient.getItem(isA(GetItemRequest.class))).thenAnswer(new Answer<GetItemResult>() {
        @Override
        public GetItemResult answer(InvocationOnMock invocation) throws Throwable {
            GetItemResult result = new GetItemResult();
            result.setItem( testResultItem );
            return result;
        }
    });

not sure if that is what your looking for but that's how we do it.

  • 3
    Thanks for the thought. Mocks are OK, but it can be hard to get the protocol exactly right. So you end up testing if you code works assuming Dynamo (or whatever) behaves the way you think it behaves (the way you mocked it), but you're not testing if you code actually works with Dynamo. If you're wrong about how Dynamo works, your code and tests make the same assumptions so things pass but you have bugs. – Oliver Dain Mar 4 '15 at 20:59
  • 2
    It sounds like your doing integration tests, for that you shouldn't have to many tests. you just want to make sure you can do the basic operations. Basically verifying that you have things connected correctly. In the past what I will do is spin up a local instance in the test. then you would have hard coded values you save, read, and delete from your local database. Other than that what are these tests of your doing? I always recommend having unit tests (test's just one thing the rest I mock) and integration tests (everything real) – Steve Smith Mar 5 '15 at 23:11
  • 1
    Theoretically mocking is the right way for unit test, but local DDB can make sure the code is right in a more promising way. – Cherish Feb 17 '16 at 17:39

There are couple of node.js wrappers for DynamoDB Local. These allows to easily execute unit tests combining with task runners like gulp or grunt. Try dynamodb-localhost, dynamodb-local

  • Have u tested this npm modules? – Prashant Tapase Apr 11 at 12:35
  • I'm the creator of those. We use them regularly. – Ashan Apr 11 at 12:53
  • Haha.. yes I installed.. let's try – Prashant Tapase Apr 11 at 12:56
  • dynamodb-localhost module have some UI bugs, difficult to use – Prashant Tapase Apr 12 at 6:15
  • UI bugs? Can you elaborate it further? This is the library used by serverless-dynamodb-local plugin as its core which has several thousands of download each week. So it will be helpful if you can mention any issues that you encounter. – Ashan Apr 12 at 6:42

In Hadoop we also use DynamoDBLocal for testing and debugging work. Please see how it's used there as example at: https://github.com/apache/hadoop/blob/HADOOP-13345/hadoop-tools/hadoop-aws/src/test/java/org/apache/hadoop/fs/s3a/s3guard/TestDynamoDBMetadataStore.java#L113

I have found that the amazon repo as no index file, so does not seem to function in a way that allows you to bring it in like this:

maven {
   url = "https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/dynamodb-local/release"
}

The only way I could get the dependencies to load is by downloading DynamoDbLocal as a jar and bringing it into my build script like this:

dependencies {
    ...
    runtime files('libs/DynamoDBLocal.jar')
    ...
}

Of course this means that all the SQLite and Jetty dependencies need to be brought in by hand - I'm still trying to get this right. If anyone knows of a reliable repo for DynamoDbLocal, I would really love to know.

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