Typically the main use of the question mark is for the conditional, x ? "yes" : "no".

But I have seen another use for it but can't find an explanation of this use of the ? operator, for example.

public int? myProperty
{
   get;
   set;
}
up vote 361 down vote accepted

It means that the value type in question is a nullable type

Nullable types are instances of the System.Nullable struct. A nullable type can represent the correct range of values for its underlying value type, plus an additional null value. For example, a Nullable, pronounced "Nullable of Int32," can be assigned any value from -2147483648 to 2147483647, or it can be assigned the null value. A Nullable can be assigned the values true, false, or null. The ability to assign null to numeric and Boolean types is especially useful when you are dealing with databases and other data types that contain elements that may not be assigned a value. For example, a Boolean field in a database can store the values true or false, or it may be undefined.

class NullableExample
{
  static void Main()
  {
      int? num = null;

      // Is the HasValue property true?
      if (num.HasValue)
      {
          System.Console.WriteLine("num = " + num.Value);
      }
      else
      {
          System.Console.WriteLine("num = Null");
      }

      // y is set to zero
      int y = num.GetValueOrDefault();

      // num.Value throws an InvalidOperationException if num.HasValue is false
      try
      {
          y = num.Value;
      }
      catch (System.InvalidOperationException e)
      {
          System.Console.WriteLine(e.Message);
      }
  }
}
  • 2
    Used for struct. Don't think it is actually useful for classes. – MonsieurDart Aug 5 '15 at 15:08
  • 7
    @MonsieurDart - thats why the answer says "value type" – Sean Aug 6 '15 at 12:06
  • Why does C# have this when most primitives already have a nullable type (Ex: int/Integer, double/Double, etc.)? – toinetoine May 16 '16 at 12:41
  • 2
    @AntoineDahan - values types do not have nullable types as they are by definition non-nullable. I think you're thinking of Java where there is an int type and a corresponding Integer class, for example. – Sean May 16 '16 at 12:55
  • 1
    more recent (2015) documentation for nullable type here – dinosaur Aug 8 '16 at 21:56

It is a shorthand for Nullable<int>. Nullable<T> is used with value types that cannot be null.

  • 3
    plus one for using the term shorthand , Pretty straight forward ! – Hari Dec 10 '14 at 13:12
  • 1
    The second sentence confuses me. What do you mean by "cannot"? On the compiler level or in the application context. – problemofficer Jun 29 '17 at 22:00
  • 3
    @problemofficer per definition, value types cannot be null. If you declare an int or a bool (which are value types) without specifically assigning a value, they would still have values (0 and false, respectively), ie. they would not be null. Unassigned reference types, such as object or MyClass, will, on the other hand, be null. You might want to read up on the difference between value types and reference types. – Klaus Byskov Pedersen Jun 30 '17 at 22:39
  • Thank you for the explanation. I understand now. – problemofficer Jul 1 '17 at 3:59

In

x ? "yes" : "no"

the ? declares an if sentence. Here: x represents the boolean condition; The part before the : is the then sentence and the part after is the else sentence.

In, for example,

int?

the ? declares a nullable type, and means that the type before it may have a null value.

  • 9
    I don't see any relationship between the '?' declaring a null-able type and a ternary expression. Voting your answer down sir. – Gus Crawford Mar 4 '15 at 15:38
  • 27
    I disagree with the comment above from Gus. The question shows that there is a possible confusion with the ternary expression. This answer addresses this issue. – levteck Jun 15 '15 at 15:04
  • Where would you use this kind of null-comparing? Inside a return it seems to not be allowed. return value ? value : "isNull"; tells me that string value isnt convertable into bool. – Tpx Sep 7 '15 at 13:20
  • I must say this is a very convoluted answer, especially when compared to others on this question.. -1 – FastTrack Feb 23 '17 at 22:37
  • This should be the accepted answer. Since it is clear and precise. +1 – JP Dolocanog Jul 26 '17 at 2:08

Nullable Types

Nullable types are instances of the System.Nullable struct. A nullable type can represent the normal range of values for its underlying value type, plus an additional null value. For example, a [Nullable<Int32>], pronounced "Nullable of Int32," can be assigned any value from -2147483648 to 2147483647, or it can be assigned the null value. A [Nullable<bool>] can be assigned the values true or false, or null. The ability to assign null to numeric and Boolean types is particularly useful when dealing with databases and other data types containing elements that may not be assigned a value. For example, a Boolean field in a database can store the values true or false, or it may be undefined.

it declares that the type is nullable.

  • 2
    Your first entry doesn't make sense, given the askers sample. – Binary Worrier Apr 22 '10 at 12:58

practical usage:

public string someFunctionThatMayBeCalledWithNullAndReturnsString(int? value)
{
  if (value == null)
  {
    return "bad value";
  }

  return someFunctionThatHandlesIntAndReturnsString(value);
}
  • 1
    While the OP is still active, 5 years after the question was asked, the answer may no longer be relevant. – Strawberry Nov 22 '15 at 12:40
  • 6
    to me it was 3 hours ago :-) – A.J.Bauer Nov 22 '15 at 15:00

To add on to the answers above, here is a code sample

struct Test
{
    int something;
}
struct NullableTest
{
    int something;
}
class Example
{
    public void Demo()
    {
        Test t = new Test();
        t = null;

        NullableTest? t2 = new NullableTest();
        t2 = null;
    }
}

This would give a compilation error:

Error 12 Cannot convert null to 'Test' because it is a non-nullable value type

Notice that there is no compilation error for NullableTest. (note the ? in the declaration of t2)

int? it's shorthand for Nullable<int>, the two forms are interchangeable.

Nullable<T> is an operator that you can use with a value type T to make it accept null.

In case you don't know it: value types are types that accepts values as int, bool, char etc...

They can't accept references to values: they would generate a compile-time error if you assign them a null, as opposed to reference types, which can obviously accept it.

Why would you need that? Because sometimes your value type variables could receive null references returned by something that didn't work very well, like a missing or undefined variable returned from a database.

I suggest you to read the Microsoft Documentation because it covers the subject quite well.

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