16

How can I increase the size of a CGRect by a certain percent value? Should I use some form of CGRectInset to do it?

Example:

Assume I have a CGRect: {10, 10, 110, 110}

I want to increase it's size (retaining the same center point) by 20% to:

{0, 0, 120, 120}

  • 3
    for 2017, it's insetBy – Fattie Feb 12 '17 at 14:49
32

You can use CGRectInset if you like:

double pct = 0.2;
CGRect newRect = CGRectInset(oldRect, -CGRectGetWidth(oldRect)*pct/2, -CGRectGetHeight(oldRect)*pct/2);

To decrease the size, remove the -s.

Side note: A CGRect that is 20% bigger than {10, 10, 100, 100} is {0, 0, 120, 120}.


Edit: If the intention is to increase by area, then this'll do it (even for rectangles that aren't square):

CGFloat width = CGRectGetWidth(oldRect);
CGFloat height = CGRectGetHeight(oldRect);
double pct = 1.2; // 20% increase
double newWidth = sqrt(width * width * pct);
double newHeight = sqrt(height * height * pct);
CGRect newRect = CGRectInset(oldRect, (width-newWidth)/2, (height-newHeight)/2);
  • Re the sidenote: I think remus is correct that (110,110) gives an area 20% bigger than (100,100). – thelaws Nov 13 '14 at 21:46
  • 1
    I suppose it depends on your interpretation of "20% bigger". By area, the resulting square has edges of length 109.5445, which isn't as pretty as just assuming he meant to increase the edge size by 20%. – Ian MacDonald Nov 13 '14 at 21:47
  • 1
    I meant increase edge sizes, but you're right, area would be an entirely different calculation, and this is a good answer. – brandonscript Nov 13 '14 at 22:22
  • Good thing I included both. :) – Ian MacDonald Nov 13 '14 at 22:23
  • Selected as answer because ^ – brandonscript Nov 13 '14 at 22:25
8

In Swift:

func increaseRect(rect: CGRect, byPercentage percentage: CGFloat) -> CGRect {
    let startWidth = CGRectGetWidth(rect)
    let startHeight = CGRectGetHeight(rect)
    let adjustmentWidth = (startWidth * percentage) / 2.0
    let adjustmentHeight = (startHeight * percentage) / 2.0
    return CGRectInset(rect, -adjustmentWidth, -adjustmentHeight)
}

let rect = CGRectMake(0, 0, 10, 10)
let adjusted = increaseRect(rect, byPercentage: 0.1)
// -0.5, -0.5, 11, 11

In ObjC:

- (CGRect)increaseRect:(CGRect)rect byPercentage:(CGFloat)percentage
{
    CGFloat startWidth = CGRectGetWidth(rect);
    CGFloat startHeight = CGRectGetHeight(rect);
    CGFloat adjustmentWidth = (startWidth * percentage) / 2.0;
    CGFloat adjustmentHeight = (startHeight * percentage) / 2.0;
    return CGRectInset(rect, -adjustmentWidth, -adjustmentHeight);
}

CGRect rect = CGRectMake(0,0,10,10);
CGRect adjusted = [self increaseRect:rect byPercentage:0.1];
// -0.5, -0.5, 11, 11
  • 1
    The question is tagged Objective-C. Best to give answers in the desired language. – rmaddy Nov 13 '14 at 21:44
  • @rmaddy - I added that as well, thanks! – Logan Nov 13 '14 at 21:46
  • 2
    +1 for being the only answerer so far to have obeyed Apple's statement that "your applications should avoid directly reading and writing the data stored in the CGRect data structure. Instead, use the functions described here to manipulate rectangles and to retrieve their characteristics."developer.apple.com/Library/ios/documentation/GraphicsImaging/… – Tommy Nov 13 '14 at 21:59
  • 2
    Apple's statement is silly. I updated my answer to conform to it anyways. :/ – Ian MacDonald Nov 13 '14 at 22:18
  • 1
    Close second, and I actually like this answer too since it's got both Objc and Swift ;) – brandonscript Nov 13 '14 at 22:26
6

Sure, using CGRectInset works:

CGRect someRect = CGRectMake(10, 10, 100, 100);
someRect = CGRectInset(someRect, someRect.size.width * -0.2, someRect.size.height * -0.2);
2

Using Swift you can retain the center point (relative to the source Rect) and increase/decrease the size as follows using an extension:

extension CGRect {
    func centerAndAdjustPercentage(percentage p: CGFloat) -> CGRect {
        let x = self.origin.x
        let y = self.origin.y
        let w = self.width
        let h = self.height

        let newW = w * p
        let newH = h * p
        let newX = (w - newW) / 2
        let newY = (h - newH) / 2

        return CGRect(x: newX, y: newY, width: newW, height: newH)
    }
}
let newRect = oldRect.centerAndAdjustPercentage(percentage: 0.25)
  • CGRect extension is convenient, but this code does not work correctly. newX and newY should be added to the origin (x, y). let newX = x + (w - newW) / 2 – user1806529 Oct 25 '18 at 15:49
2

I'm using CGRect > insetBy in my Swift code

https://developer.apple.com/documentation/coregraphics/cgrect/1454218-insetby

With this, your percent value will be the scaleX as my example.

    let dx = rectWidth*scaleX
    let dy = rectHeight*scaleX
    let rectangle = CGRect(x: rectX,
                           y: rectY,
                           width: rectWidth,
                           height: rectHeight).insetBy(dx: -dx, dy: -dy)
  • use positive value to scale down
  • use negative value to scale up
1

Swift 4 extension inspired by several of the answers here with simplified calculations:

extension CGRect {
    func scaleLinear(amount: Double) -> CGRect {
        guard amount != 1.0, amount > 0.0 else { return self }
        let ratio = ((1.0 - amount) / 2.0).cgFloat
        return insetBy(dx: width * ratio, dy: height * ratio)
    }

    func scaleArea(amount: Double) -> CGRect {
        return scaleLinear(percent: sqrt(amount))
    }

    func scaleLinear(percent: Double) -> CGRect {
        return scaleLinear(amount: percent / 100)
    }

    func scaleArea(percent: Double) -> CGRect {
        return scaleArea(amount: percent / 100)
    }
}

Usage is simply:

rect.scaleLinear(percent: 120.0)  OR (amount: 1.2)
rect.scaleArea(percent: 120.0)  OR (amount: 1.2)

If you are interested in trying my testing methods:

/// Testing
extension CGRect {
    var area: CGFloat { return width * height }
    var center: CGPoint { return CGPoint(x: origin.x + width/2, y: origin.y + height/2)
    }

    func compare(_ r: CGRect) {
        let centered = center.x == r.center.x && center.y == r.center.y
        print("linear = \(r.width / width), area = \(r.area / area) centered \(centered)")
    }

    static func ScaleTest() {
        let rect = CGRect(x: 17, y: 24, width: 200, height: 100)
        let percent = 122.6
        rect.compare(rect.scaleLinear(percent: percent))
        rect.compare(rect.scaleArea(percent: percent))
    }
}
0
let scale = percent / 100
let newRect = oldRect.applying(CGAffineTransform(scaleX: scale, y: scale))

Beware that this approach also will change x and y of rectangle.

  • This does not appear to scale relative to the center of the rectangle, thus does not change the x,y origin. – lhunath Feb 12 '18 at 0:30
  • As the above comment states, this doesn't keep the center point of the rect! – Harry Bloom Apr 22 '18 at 14:05

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