2

This is problem I was asked and am wondering how to do or whether it's a trick question. I've only been working with JavaScript for a short while, so I'm not too sure.

Assume you have a web page with lots of content. Without using any library or getElementsByClassName, traverse the DOM and find all elements which have a particular class name.

Sample HTML

<body>
    <div>
        <div class='myTarget'>
             Target exists here
        </div>
    </div>

    <div>
        <table>
            <tbody>
              <tr> <td class='myTarget'> Target exists here </td> </tr>
            </tbody>
        </table>
    </div>

    <div>
       <span class='myTarget notSameAsTarget'>Stuff<span>
    </div>

</body>

My first thought is that this should be a recursive function and should start at the root document.documentElement

JS:

var root = document.documentElement;
var targetClass = 'myTarget';
var elementsWithTargetClass = []; // store in array

function traverse(element, targetClassName){
    // get class of current element
    var currentClass = element.className;

    // add to array if class matches
    if(currentClass.trim() === targetClassName)
        elementsWithTargetClass.push(element);

    // recursive call
    if(element.children){
         traverse(element, targetClassName);
    }

}

Any suggestions on what I'm missing?

    // recursive call - updated
    if(element.children){
         for(var child in element.children)
             traverse(element.children[child], targetClassName);
    }
  • traverse(element) That isn't what you want. – SLaks Nov 13 '14 at 22:11
  • To full traverse the DOM you need to do a pre-order traversal of the tree. – Ryan Nov 13 '14 at 22:11
  • 1
    You're recursively calling traverse() on the same element (instead of its children), infinitely. – Paul Roub Nov 13 '14 at 22:14
  • 2
    Also, you'll want to do some sort of regex on className, otherwise you'll miss elements that have both myTarget and another class. – Paul Roub Nov 13 '14 at 22:15
  • @PaulRoub can you suggest something? – SoluableNonagon Nov 13 '14 at 22:18
8

Your recursive call to traverse() passes the same element that was initially passed in, so it's just doing the exact same thing over and over until the stack overflows (hey!). You need to call traverse for each of the children of element rather than passing element back in.

  • First to notice the big error (and write it in an answer) – SoluableNonagon Nov 13 '14 at 22:30
2

Use document.querySelector. This is not getElementsByClassName(), nor a library. ;)

document.querySelector('.myTarget')
  • Perhaps, but technically fulfills the requirements. – Scimonster Nov 13 '14 at 22:14
  • @Vohuman , I mean that in the sense of show code for traversing the DOM rather that using a built in method or library. – SoluableNonagon Nov 13 '14 at 22:28
2

Taking into account elements with multiple classes, and starting with body:

  var targetClass = 'myTarget';
  var elementsWithTargetClass = []; // store in array
  var re = new RegExp("\\b" + targetClass + "\\b");
  
  traverse(document.body);
  
  for ( var j = 0; j < elementsWithTargetClass.length; ++j )
    elementsWithTargetClass[j].style.fontWeight = "bold";
  
  function traverse(element, targetClassName){
      // get class of current element
      var currentClass = element.className;
  
      if (currentClass.match(re))
      // add to array if class matches
    //  if(currentClass.trim() === targetClassName)
          elementsWithTargetClass.push(element);
  
      // recursive call
      if(element.children){
        for ( var i = 0; i < element.children.length; ++i )
           traverse(element.children[i]);
      }
  }
<div>
  <ul>
    <li class="myTarget">this</li>
    <li class="myTarget andAnotherClass">also this</li>
    <li>not this</li>
  </ul>
</div>

  • Why don't you use classList? – Scimonster Nov 13 '14 at 22:28
  • 1
    @Scimonster Not available in older browsers (where "older" even includes IE 9). – Paul Roub Nov 13 '14 at 22:35
1

You are getting into to many recursions which makes the call stack grow to high. Try chaning your recursive function into a loop. This should not give you any problems.

  • Wrong. The call stack is big enough that stack overflows are usually a result of user error. – SLaks Nov 13 '14 at 22:11
1
var root = document.documentElement;
var targetClass = 'myTarget';
var elementsWithTargetClass = []; // store in array
pre_order(root);

function pre_order(node) {
  if(node.className == targetClass) 
    elementsWithTargetClass.push(node);       
  for(var i=0; i < node.childNodes.length; i++)
    pre_order(node.childNodes[i]);
}
console.log(elementsWithTargetClass);

JSFiddle

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