I am using $.ajax to make a post request. Then, I am trying to call a function before success or failure of the ajax request. Right now my approach is like following

var someCallback = function() {
     //do something
};
var Success = false;
$.ajax({
    type: "POST",
    url: "/some/service",
    dataType: "text",
    data: JSON.stringify(someData),
    contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
    success: function (data) {
        someCallBack(); //<--- this is the function
        Success = true;//doesnt goes here
    },
    error: function (textStatus, errorThrown) {
        someCallBack();
        Success = false;//doesnt goes here
    }

});

The thing is, i need to run someCallBack() after the ajax request completes irrespective of whether it succeeds or fails but before success or error callback is called. I dont want to use ajaxStart and ajaxStop in this scenario. I looked at 'complete' callback, but it is only called after error or success. I don't want to call the someCallBack() at two places. Any Suggestions, Please.

  • Why do you need it to be called before the success or error callbacks? What functional dependency is there? – Bergi Nov 14 '14 at 0:22
  • Use promises syntax - then you can use .always(), followed by .done() and .fail() – zerkms Nov 14 '14 at 0:23
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you're looking for ajax' deferred interface, which has an always method. And you can chain your success/error handlers after that - though you cannot use those that go into the options object.

$.ajax({
    type: "POST",
    url: "/some/service",
    dataType: "text",
    data: JSON.stringify(someData),
    contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8"
})
.always(someCallBack)
.done(function (data) {
    var Success = true; // goes here after someCallBack()
})
.fail(function (textStatus, errorThrown) {
    var Success = false; // goes here after someCallBack()
});
  • The Problem is i want to run someCallBack only after i get response from the request. Is there any way to do that. – sdhakal Nov 14 '14 at 1:23
  • Yes, that is what my code does. – Bergi Nov 14 '14 at 2:11
  • Yup, Works like a charm. I had some other issue which was not triggering someCallBack..Never mind...Thanks alot – sdhakal Nov 14 '14 at 2:30

AJAX supports beforeSend

$.ajax({
  url: "http://example.com",
  beforeSend: function( xhr ) {
    xhr.overrideMimeType( "text/plain; charset=x-user-defined" );
  }
}).always(function() {
   callback();
});

I misread your question. I sounds like you need .always() ?

  • 1
    He said "run someCallBack() after the ajax request completes" – Bergi Nov 14 '14 at 0:23
  • beforeSend is A pre-request callback function that can be used to modify the jqXHR (in jQuery 1.4.x, XMLHTTPRequest) object before it is sent. It doesnot suit my purpose. – sdhakal Nov 14 '14 at 0:24
  • Modified my answer. What about .always()? – elzi Nov 14 '14 at 0:25

$.ajax returns a $.Deferred (more specifically, a jqXHR), which you can use to define your callbacks. In your case, the advantage to this over defining callbacks within the ajax setting object is that your callbacks will be executed in the order that they are defined:

($.Deferred() behaves just like your $.ajax(settings) call)

Success:

$.Deferred()
  .always(function() { console.log('always'); })
  .done(function() { console.log('done'); })
  .fail(function() { console.log('fail'); })
  .resolve();
// "always"
// "done"

Failure:

$.Deferred()
  .always(function() { console.log('always'); })
  .done(function() { console.log('done'); })
  .fail(function() { console.log('fail'); })
  .reject();
// "always"
// "fail"

Likewise, if .always is defined last, it will execute last:

$.Deferred()
  .done(function() { console.log('done'); })
  .fail(function() { console.log('fail'); })
  .always(function() { console.log('always'); })
  .resolve();
// "done"
// "always"

You just need to bind 2 ajax events: ajaxSend and ajaxComplete. For example

$(document).bind("ajaxSend", function(){
    $("#loading").show();
}).bind("ajaxComplete", function(){
    $("#loading").hide();
});

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