Hi I am having a hard time making this countdown work for me. I am trying to make it count down to every sunday at 11:15am since that is when our church service starts. Can anyone pleaes help me? I have the code here.


function croAnim(){ 

    // IF THERE'S A COUNTDOWN
    if ($('ul.cro_timervalue').length !== 0) {


        // GET ALL THE INSTANCES OF THE TIMER
        $('ul.cro_timervalue').each(function() {

            var $this       = $(this),
                timesets    = $this.data('cro-countdownvalue'),               
                now         = new Date(),
                tset        = Math.floor(now / 1000),
                counter1    = timesets - tset;


            // CALCULATE SECONDS
            var seconds1    = Math.floor(counter1 % 60);  
                seconds1    = (seconds1 < 10 && seconds1 >= 0) ? '0'+ seconds1 : seconds1;


            // CALCULATE MINUTES                
            counter1        =counter1/60;
            var minutes1    =Math.floor(counter1 % 60);
            minutes1        = (minutes1 < 10 && minutes1 >= 0) ? '0'+ minutes1 : minutes1;


            // CALCULATE HOURS
            counter1=counter1/60;
            var hours1=Math.floor(counter1 % 24);
            hours1 = (hours1 < 10 && hours1 >= 0) ? '0'+ hours1 : hours1;


            // CALCULATE DAYS
            counter1    =counter1/24;
            var days1   =Math.floor(counter1);
            days1       = (days1 < 10 && days1 >= 0) ? '0'+ days1 : days1;



            // ADD THE VALUES TO THE CORRECT DIVS
            $this.find('span.secondnumber').html(seconds1);
            $this.find('span.minutenumber').html(minutes1);
            $this.find('span.hournumber').html(hours1);
            $this.find('span.daynumber').html(days1); 


        });
    }
}


// CREATE A INTERVAL FOR THE TIMER
croInit = setInterval(croAnim, 100);
  • I answered your question below. However, I wanted to point out that croInit = setInterval(croAnim, 100); runs 10x more often than it has to. There are 1000ms per second, so your interval should run every 1000, not 100, ms. (Unless you want to run it 10 times per second, which seems wasteful—at least you're not wasting your electricity, I guess) – royhowie Nov 14 '14 at 6:22

I answered a similar question about a week or so ago. I have a really simple countdown function already written. The trick is to modify it to get the next Sunday @ 11:15 am, which I've written a function for.

var getNextSunday = function () {
    var today = new Date(),
        day = today.getDay(),	// 1 for Mon, 2 for Tue, 3 for Wed, etc.
        delta = 7 - day;

    var sunday = new Date(today.getTime() + (delta * 24 * 3600 * 1000));

    sunday.setHours(11);
    sunday.setMinutes(15);
    sunday.setSeconds(0);

    return sunday;
}

var t = getNextSunday(),
    p = document.getElementById("time"),
    timer;
var u = function () {
    var delta = t - new Date(),
        d = delta / (24 * 3600 * 1000) | 0,
        h = (delta %= 24 * 3600 * 1000) / (3600 * 1000) | 0,
        m = (delta %= 3600 * 1000) / (60 * 1000) | 0,
        s = (delta %= 60 * 1000) / 1000 | 0;
    
    if (delta < 0) {
        clearInterval(timer);
        p.innerHTML = "timer's finished!";
    } else {
        p.innerHTML = d + "d " + h + "h " + m + "m " + s + "s";
    }
}
timer = setInterval(u, 1000);
<h1 id="time"></h1>

This should be easy enough to adapt to fit your website's needs. The only tricky part might be my use of

h = (delta %= 24 * 3600 * 1000) / (3600 * 1000) | 0

delta %= ... returns delta, after performing the %=. This was just to save characters. If you don't like this, you can just separate the delta %= ... part:

delta %= 24 * 3600 * 1000;
h = delta / (3600 * 1000) | 0;
// ... do the same for the rest
  • While it likely would not matter in this case ... setInterval() is evil :P – Burdock Nov 14 '14 at 6:44
  • @Burdock setTimeout is really no different, especially with how you're using it. – royhowie Nov 14 '14 at 6:56
  • @yoyhowie Sadly old Internet Explorers will throw errors with Date in some cases. setInterval will be more then happy to call the erring function till the end of time and bog down the browser. – Burdock Nov 14 '14 at 7:12
  • That being said : I quite like your answer XD - Its always cool to see how others implement things differently. – Burdock Nov 14 '14 at 7:16

This object uses a few semi-advanced javascript ideas (closures and * IIFE*) so hopefully it is easy-ish to understand. If you have any questions feel free to leave a comment.

var churchtime = (function (){
    // Total seconds passed in the week by sunday 11:15am
            var magic_number = 558900;
    var now;
    var rawtime = function (){
          //updates now with the current date and time
          now = new Date()
          //Converts now into pure seconds  
          return (((((((now.getDay()-1)*24)+now.getHours())*60)+now.getMinutes())*60)+now.getSeconds());
    };

    //closure
    return {

        raw_countdown : function (){
            return Math.abs(rawtime()-magic_number);
        },

        countdown : function(){      
            var time = Math.abs(rawtime()-magic_number)  
            var seconds = time % 60, time = (time - seconds)/60; 
            var minutes = time % 60, time = (time - minutes)/60; 
            var hours = time % 24, time = (time - hours)/24;
            var days = time;
            return [days,hours,minutes,seconds];
        }
    }

})(558900); //<- Total seconds passed in the week by sunday 11:15am


churchtime.raw_countdown()// returns the raw number of seconds until church 

churchtime.countdown() // returns an array of time until church [days,hours,minutes,seconds]

Once you have an object like churchtime, it should be super easy to implement.

For example:

var churchtime = (function(magic_number) {
  var now;
  var rawtime = function() {
    //updates now with the current date and time
    now = new Date()
      //Converts now into pure seconds  
    return (((((((now.getDay() - 1) * 24) + now.getHours()) * 60) + now.getMinutes()) * 60) + now.getSeconds());
  };

  //closure
  return {

    raw_countdown: function() {
      return Math.abs(rawtime() - magic_number);
    },

    countdown: function() {
      var time = Math.abs(rawtime() - magic_number)
      var seconds = time % 60,
        time = (time - seconds) / 60;
      var minutes = time % 60,
        time = (time - minutes) / 60;
      var hours = time % 24,
        time = (time - hours) / 24;
      var days = time;
      return [days, hours, minutes, seconds];
    }
  }

})(); //<- IIFE


AutoUpdate = function AutoUpdate() {
  var time = churchtime.countdown();
  document.getElementById("day").innerHTML = time[0];
  document.getElementById("hour").innerHTML = time[1];
  document.getElementById("min").innerHTML = time[2];
  document.getElementById("sec").innerHTML = time[3];
  setTimeout(AutoUpdate, 900); //Calls it's self again after .9 seconds
}(); //<- IIFE
<h1>Day:<span id="day"></span> Hour:<span id="hour"></span>
Minute:<span id="min"></span> second: <span id="sec"></span></h1>

  • You probably meant to write setTimeout(Update, 900). You want to pass the function to the timeout, not what it returns. – royhowie Nov 14 '14 at 6:59
  • Yep, thanks I didn't catch that. Coding at 12:00 is not always the best idea :P – Burdock Nov 14 '14 at 7:04

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