14

Can Domain Services access Repositories? Or they should work on Aggregates/Entities passed to them by Application Services?

Consider two code samples of the same business operation - money transfer. As first step, I alter account balances. Then I obtain the notification email and send the notification. I know, I should probably abstract the way notifications are sent (email, SMS, carrier pigeon), but for simplicity's sake let's assume that we support only emails by now.

Variant 1 uses repositories inside the domain service. Variant 2 resolves dependencies in the application service and passes them to the TransferDomainService.

In this example the operation is simple (subtract money from one account and add it to another). But if there would be more business rules involved (possible requiring access to more aggregates)? If variant 2 is applied, then the application service must have the knowledge what exactly the domain service requires. If variant 1 is chosen, then the domain service asks repositories for what it requires to perform its task.

(Notes about snippets: Groovy code to strip verbosity of Java. DDD building blocks included in names)

Variant 1

class TransferApplicationService {
    def transferDomainService
    def customerDomainService
    def emailNotifierInfrastructureService

    def transfer(fromAccount, toAccount, amount) {
        transferDomainService.transfer(fromAccount, toAccount, amount)
        def email = customerDomainService.accountNotificationEmail(toAccount)
        emailNotifierInfrastructureService.notifyAboutTransfer(email, amount)
    }
}

class TransferDomainService {
    def accountRepository
    def transfer(fromAccount, toAccount, amount) {
        def from = accountRepository.findByNumber(fromAccount)
        def to = accountRepository.findByNumber(toAccount)
        to.decreaseBalance(amount)
        from.increaseBalance(amount)
    }
}

Variant 2

class TransferApplicationService {
    def accountRepository
    def transferDomainService
    def customerDomainService
    def notifierInfrastructureService

    def transfer(fromAccount, toAccount, amount) {
        def from = accountRepository.findByNumber(fromAccount)
        def to = accountRepository.findByNumber(toAccount)
        transferDomainService.transfer(from, to, amount)
        def email = customerDomainService.accountNotificationEmail(toAccount)
        notifierInfrastructureService.notifyAboutTransfer(email, amount)
    }
}

class TransferDomainService {
    def transfer(fromAccount, toAccount, amount) {
        to.decreaseBalance(amount)
        from.increaseBalance(amount)
    }
}
  • Yes. A Domain Service is still an orchestrator only its area of expertise is more restricted – MikeSW Nov 14 '14 at 22:52
  • @MikeSW do you mean by "Yes" "Domain Services access Repositories" or "they work on Aggregates/Entities passed to them by Application Services"? – mgryszko Nov 15 '14 at 14:30
  • Yes to the title question. – MikeSW Nov 15 '14 at 14:34
  • I this vimeo.com/130256611 video the guy advices to not use repositories in your ApplicationsService. Your ApplicationService orchestrates DomainDervices, where a DomainService uses repositories. – user237329 May 26 '16 at 13:46
  • We are using DDD with CQRS. We use Handlers that decide what to do with UI data coming as Commands. Most of the time a Handler has a repository of an aggregate root injected. It calls a method on the AR and saves it back to the repository. A "Handler" IS an Application Service. While for instance an OrderNumberGenerator is a Domain Service. It can also require and receive a repository. It's just inside the Domain Layer, not the Application. – webDEVILopers Sep 15 '16 at 12:51
11

Well, I would say that if choosing which entities to load comes down to a good deal of domain logic, then I might delegate that task to the domain service. However, I would usually strive to resolve aggregate root references in application services.

However, I think you might have a few other issues in here or at least you could use some other DDD tactical patterns like Domain Events to improve your design.

In my opinion, you shouldn't have any notification sending code in the application service at all. Instead, a MoneyTransferred domain event could be raised by the domain service. You would then have a subscriber to this event which would be in charge for sending the email.

In addition to decoupling your components, you are enriching the ubiquitous language of your domain. Sending a notification now occurs in response to a money transfer being made rather than as part of the same process and many other interested parties could react as well.

Finally, your domain service is currently violating the rule of modifying only one aggregate root per transaction. I'm not saying you can never break the rule, but usually that's a good indicator that you should be using eventual consistency, or perhaps that your aggregate boundaries are wrong.

If you think about it, money transfers between accounts rarely occurs in an atomic way (if they ever do). I guess that could be the case if the two accounts are in the same bank, but eventual consistency has to be used when the transfer spans multiple banks.

  • Don't take my sample as code as something taken from the production code :). I just wanted to set a context for the Domain Service - Repository variants. – mgryszko Nov 15 '14 at 10:37
  • @mgryszko Well, in DDD you cannot have answers on fictionnal domains and then apply that to your own domain. All answers always comes down to "it depends". You have a set of rules and guidelines, but nothing that is ever set in stone. What I am saying is that application services should resolve aggregates to the domain service, unless that leaks domain logic in the application service (e.g. finding those dependencies is based on domain rules). Also, what I am saying is that, if you were not modifying both aggregate in the same transaction, perhaps you would not even need a domain service. – plalx Nov 15 '14 at 14:27
  • 2
    There is no such 'rule' that only one AR should be modified by one one service. – MikeSW Nov 15 '14 at 14:33
  • @MikeSW Only one aggregate should be modified per transaction since aggregates are transactionnal boundaries... you can find that rule pretty much everywhere (e.g. "And a properly designed bounded context modifies only one aggregate instance per transaction in all cases" taken from this article by no else but Vaughn Vernon himself). – plalx Nov 15 '14 at 14:50
  • 2
    I can't think of an example right now, but it shouldn't be an artificial rule. It all depends on the Domain and a business process might involve more than 1 AR. An aggregate defines consistency boundaries but a Domain service (use case) might need to work with multiple aggregates i.e multiple different transactions. I don't know if I make much sense, DDD is full of very subtle and tricky nunances – MikeSW Nov 15 '14 at 15:04

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