2

Assume the following code:

class myClass{
    myClass(int a, int b, int c){};
};

main(){
   myClass cl(2,5,6);
}

myClass cl(2,5,6); will work. But what if I want the constructor to work only with specific values? For example a>1 b>2 c>1. Is there any way to detect wrong arguments and "cancel" the creation of cl within the constructor?

1

Before I begin, I want to clarify that this is actually a pretty big topic in C++, and many design patterns are explicitly designed around this problem.

A nieve approach is to throw an exception in the contructor:

class myClass {
public:
  myClass(int a, int b, int c) 
  {
    if (a<=1 || b <= 2 || c<=1) throw "some exception";
  }
};

This is generally considered a bad practice, as the destructor for the class will never be called! As a rule of thumb, constructors should be fast and simple. If a constructor can fail, you should try something else. Also, exception handling is notoriously slow in C++.

So alot of people go with the an initialize call instead:

class myClass {
  public:
     myClass() { initialized_ = true;}
     void initialize((int a, int b, int c) { initialized_ = !(a<=1 || b <= 2 || c<=1);}
     bool alive() {return intialized_;}
  private:
     bool initialized_;
 };

Then, when you use the class you can check after an initialization attempt if the object succeeds.

 myClass c;
 c.initialize(2,5,6);

I personally don't like this because you end up with zombie classes.

 myClass c;
 c.initialize(0,0,0);
 c.foo();//Legal, compiles, but is WRONG

This Zombie Class apposes the idea of RAII, and honestly I shouldn't have to do that check all the time.

My prefered way of dealing with this is factory methods.

 class myClass
 {
 public:
    static myClass* makeMyClass(int a, int b, int c)
    {
       myClass* ret = new myClass();
       ret->initialize(a,b,c);
       if (!ret->alive()) {delete ret; return null;}
       return ret;
    }
 private:
    myClass() { initialized_ = true;}
     void initialize((int a, int b, int c) { initialized_ = !(a<=1 || b <= 2 || c<=1);}
     bool alive() {return intialized_;}
  private:
     bool initialized_;
 };

(protip don't use raw pointers, use smart pointers).

5

Yes you can do that. You just have to validate the arguments inside constructor's body. If they are invalid then throw exception.

Class Invalid
{
 private:
    int m_x, m_y;
 public :
    class MyException : public exception {};

    Invalid ( int x, int y )
    {
       if ( x < 0 || y > 100 )
            throw MyException ();
       ...             
    }
}; 
3

You can do something like this:

myClass(int a, int b, int c)
{
    if (a <= 1){
        throw something; // ToDo - define `something`, a text string would work.
    }
}

And so on. Note one important point, the destructor will not be called if an exception is thrown in a constructor (although any base class destructors will be called). That'a quite a common cause for memory leakage.

0

You can use static_assert to achieve compilation time checking, but maybe you have to wrap your call in an ugly macro, or maybe in a template.

Something like (hopefully less ugly):

class myClass{
public:
  myClass(int a, int b, int c){};
};

#define SafeMyClass(obj, a,b,c) static_assert(a<b,"a<b"); static_assert(b<c,"b<c"); myClass obj(a,b,c);

int main(){
  SafeMyClass(cl,2,5,6);
  return 0;
}
  • What about variables as parameter for the constructor? I don't think static_assert is a good idea for this scenario. – tgmath Nov 14 '14 at 16:02
  • The values are being passed into the constructor at run-time. A static_assert will not work here. – Brian Fairservice Nov 14 '14 at 16:06
  • @dogjones it works as long as the parameters are constexpr, e.g. in the example. – tgmath Nov 14 '14 at 16:08
0

Since you know the range of acceptable values at program-writing time, an attempt to construct the class with incorrect values means your program has broken. You should use an assert. Asserts are used to document correct usage of a class / function / etc, and to ease the debugging process.
http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/cassert/assert/

class myClass{
    myClass(int a, int b, int c) {
        assert(a > 1 && b > 2 && c > 2); 
    };
};

assert will throw an exception if the boolean which you pass to it evaluates to false.

By saying assert(a > 1 && b > 2 && c > 2); you are saying "the program should never construct myClass with values for a, b, and c that are outside of the correct range". If the program does so, the program is incorrect. This will make it very easy for you to find and correct the error.

If the values are coming from somewhere that you can't control, such as user-input, you should validate that input outside of the myClass's constructor. This is proper separation of concerns.

Another advantage of using assert is that when you compile your release / optimized build, the asserts will evaluate to null statements. This way code which is intended to help you debug will not slow down your release build.

Remember to #include <assert.h>.

0

This is how i do it

 class myClass{
    public:
        myClass(int a, int b, int c):aValue(a), bValue(b), cValue(c){};
    private:
        int aValue;
        int bValue;
        int cValue;
 };

 myClass::myClass(int a, int b, int c){
     if(a<2) throw rangeError("the 'a' should be larger than one");
     if(b<3) throw rangeError("the 'b' should be larger than one");
     if(c<2) throw rangeError("the 'c' should be larger than one");
 }

 void main(){
    try{
        myClass cl(2,5,6);
    }catch(rangeError re){
        cout << re.what() << endl;
    }
 }

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