7

So I'm trying to get my head around Git, and have the need (why I have this need I won't go into) to be able to take the files from one repo, via command line, and put them into a brand new repository WITHOUT taking all of the previous commit history with it.

What I'm trying to do at the moment is git init to create a new repository, and then grab the files from my existing repo, either using clone or subtree (I've not got my head fully around this yet so may be barking up the wrong tree), and then add, commit, and then push these to my new repository.

git init
--- get the files from stock repo ---
git add .
git commit -m 'Initial commit'
git remote add origin <url of my new repo>
git push -u origin master

My repositories are all on Bitbucket, if that makes a difference,

2
  • Can you not just rsync the files somewhere else and then git init there? Commented Nov 14, 2014 at 18:30
  • yeah, it looks unprofessional if there are too many swear words and such in a repo :P Commented Nov 14, 2014 at 18:31

4 Answers 4

19

You can clone the old repository like:

git clone [email protected]:username/repository.git

and then you delete the git directory:

rm -rf .git/

Now you create the new repository:

git init
0
1

If you have those files from stock repo cloned somewhere, you can do a:

cd yourNewRepo
git --work-tree=/path/to/stock/repo add .
git commit -m 'Initial commit'

That means: you are considering the files from /path/to/stock/repo as your working tree for your new repo (just for the git add step)

Once the index of your new repo has recorded those files, you can forget about the stock repo, and commit those new files (without any prior history) in your new repo.

1

If you've already got the TMI repo cloned you can reset your clone's master to have only that one's tip commit for history with

git branch -f master `git commit-tree -m "My new initial commit" origin/master^{tree}`

and then do as usual, fix up the remotes and push histories around as as you like.

(edit: if you've got master checked out git branch won't want to rewrite the ref, but you're not touching the content at all, so you can bypass all the porcelain's handholding and just do it

git update-ref -m "Truncating history" refs/heads/master \
        `git commit-tree -m "My new initial commit" origin/master^{tree}`

)

1
  1. You clone the old repository like:

    git clone [email protected]:username/repository.git

  2. Then you delete the git directory:

    rm -rf .git

  3. Create the new repository:

    git init

  4. Commit the new repository and push it to the master origin

    git push -u origin master

If possibele, check the status of the git log to verify you have the correct info logged.

2
  • 1
    rm -rf works better than rm -R in the accepted answer
    – Anupam
    Commented Jun 8, 2018 at 6:16
  • Why even resurrect this old question? Commented Jul 20, 2018 at 15:40

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