0
name = input('What is your name?')
print('Welcome to my quiz', name)

guess = 0
tries = 0
answer = 5
score = 0

while guess != answer and tries < 2:
    guess = input('10/2 is...')
    if guess == answer:
        print("Correct")
        score = score + 10
    else:
        print("Incorrect")
        score = score - 3
        tries = tries + 1

guess = 0
tries = 0
answer = 25

while guess != answer and tries < 2:
    guess = input('5*5 is...')
    if guess == answer:
        print('Correct')
        score = score + 10
    else:
        print('Incorrrect')
        score = score - 3
        tries = tries + 1
print ('Thank you for playing',name)

The problem I'm having is that when I test the code, every time I answer the question it prints incorrect even if the answer is correct.

  • 2
    1. 'While' != 'while' and 2. '5' != 5 - the input is always a string. – jonrsharpe Nov 15 '14 at 14:52
1

Try:

    guess = raw_input()
    guess = int(guess)

OR

    guess = int(input('10/2 is...'))

And please indent your code accordingly.

You are trying to equate '5' (a character) to 5 (an integer) which is false because '5' in ASCII isn't really equal to the integer 5. So you have to input an integer, not a string/character.

and as @johnrsharpe pointed out replace 'While' to 'while'.

| improve this answer | |
  • Question is tagged Python 3.x which doesn't have raw_input. Probably shouldn't assume the string is ascii. – wwii Nov 15 '14 at 15:07
0

The problem is: when you get an user input with input() function, the returned value will be always a string. In this way, '5' is different from 5. See:

Try:

>>> a = input('type a number: ')
3
>>> type(a)
<class 'str'>
>>> b = 3
>>> type(b)
<class 'int'>
>>> a == b
False

But if you convert the user input to an int object you may be able to do the comparison:

>>> converted_a = int(a)
>>> type(converted_a)
<class 'int'>
>>> converter_a == b
True

So, a shortcut for this would be:

>>> a = int(input('Type a number: '))
>>> type(a)
<class 'int'>

In your example you just need embed the user input inside the int() function:

guess = int(input('your question here: '))

But be careful with this approach. It just works if the user types a convertible value, which means if the user types a letter your program will not work.

>>> a = int(input('Type a number: '))
x
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10: 'x'

So, you will need to do some kind of validation on the user input before use it.

| improve this answer | |

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