3

so i have a timer, which runs every second. Mostly it only takes a few milliseconds to run, but sometimes the execution of one timer run, exceeds 1 second. This is in itself not a problem, because c# handles putting the different runs in different (or the same) threads etc.

But what if i want to recognize by which run a certain method was called, when 2 runs are being executed at the same time? I would like to have an output in my console like:

Run 1: Method "GetThisStuff" called
Run 1: Method "GetOtherStuff" called
Run 2: Method "GetThisStuff" called
Run 1: Method "GetFinalStuff" called
Run 2: Method "GetOtherStuff" called
Run 2: Method "GetFinalStuff" called

If i have a timer method

public static void timer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)  {
     GetMainStuff();
     GetMoreMainStuff();

 }

And some dummy methods:

public void GetMainStuff()
{
   GetThisStuff();
   GetOtherStuff();
}

public void GetMoreMainStuff()
{
   GetFinalStuff();
}

I know there is

ElapsedEventArgs.SignalTime

but i don't want to give this as a parameter through every method of my app (down several "levels").

I also know, that not every new run will have a new thread.

And if i have a static remembered SignalTime, it will be overwritten every run.

Any Ideas?

2
  • Your assertion is just wrong, it is always a problem. Simply set the AutoReset property to false and call Start() at the end of your event handler. Commented Nov 15, 2014 at 18:28
  • Well i know that there are generally (a lot of) problems with multithreading, but this is not currently causing me any problems, that's probably what i meant.;) But my question is still how to identify different runs when they are timely overlapping, not let the runs run after each other.
    – blinci
    Commented Nov 16, 2014 at 0:35

2 Answers 2

1

As System.Timers.Timer is not sealed, you could extend it to add a Counter property:

public class TimerWithRunCounter : System.Timers.Timer
{
    public int Counter { get; set; }

    public TimerWithRunCounter(int counter, double interval) : base(interval)
    {
        Counter = counter;
    }
}

Cast sender to TimerWithRunCounter in the timer callback and access and increment the counter:

public static void timer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
    var timer = (TimerWithRunCounter)sender;
    lock (lockObject)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Run {0}", timer.Counter);
        timer.Counter++;
    }
}

Example usage:

var timer = new TimerWithRunCounter(0, 1000);
1

Do you need the methods themselves to know the context? Or do you just need to know in the event handler?

The simplest way to accomplish this is to maintain a counter in the same class with the event handler:

private static int _timerCounter;

public static void timer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
    int counter = Interlocked.Increment(ref _timerCounter);

    GetMainStuff();
    GetMoreMainStuff();
}

If each called method needs to know this value, then of course you can pass the value:

public static void timer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
    int counter = Interlocked.Increment(ref _timerCounter);

    GetMainStuff(counter);
    GetMoreMainStuff(counter);
}

If you have a deep call chain in which you want to broadly know the counter throughout the context, then you can either continue the above pattern, passing the value on down into each called method, or you can create a "calling context" class, into which you put the code for those methods, along with the current counter's value:

class TimerContext
{
    private readonly int _timerCount;
    public int TimerCount { get { return _timerCount; } }

    public TimerContext(int timerCount)
    {
        _timerCount = timerCount;
    }

    public void GetMainStuff()
    {
        GetThisStuff();
        GetOtherStuff();
    }

    public void GetMoreMainStuff()
    {
        GetFinalStuff();
    }

    // etc.
}

public static void timer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
    TimerContext context = new TimerContext(Interlocked.Increment(ref _timerCounter));

    context.GetMainStuff();
    context.GetMoreMainStuff();
}

In that way, every single method you call, being a member of the TimerContext class, has access to the counter.

Those are just a few different approaches you can take. Of course, there are other options but hopefully the above gives you some idea of how those options would work (they are all variations on the theme).

3
  • The idea with a "calling context" class is good, because i have a deep call chain and it just wouldn't be good to put this parameter in 400 or so methods... But it's still a problem..., because all my methods in my elapsed-event-handler have sensible classes already so putting all these in a context class would just ruin my neatly defined classes and methods. I just used dummy methods as an example. Any ideas on that?
    – blinci
    Commented Nov 16, 2014 at 0:23
  • Ok, i could let all my classes inherit from the context class i guess.. hmmmm
    – blinci
    Commented Nov 16, 2014 at 0:40
  • I would discourage inheriting a class simply for the same of sharing some specific data. It's hard to give specific advice without knowing why you wanted the counter in the first place. I.e. you say it's okay to have overlapping timer processing, so why is the exact sequence important at all? If it is important, instead of a counter you might consider serializing by taking a lock in the event handler. Finally, note that the point of the calling context is to allow every method access to the counter. Do you really have 400 methods all of which need to know the counter's value? Commented Nov 16, 2014 at 3:17

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