3

I am encountering an error with the function detailed in this post.

The problem occurs because I am trying to return a type corresponding to the input types. Can anyone suggest a solution? I originally had a function for each type, and then a generic interface to group them into the same name. Now I am trying to put everything in a single function using polymorphism.

Here is the error that gfortran is giving me.

gfortran -o build/lib/foul.o -c -ffree-form -g -J./build/lib lib/foul.f
lib/foul.f:471.45:

Function cassign (expr, a, b, wrn) Result (c)

I have tried to use an allocatable array. In the main program I then do

Character (len=65), Allocatable :: sc(:)
Integer, Allocatable :: ic(:)
Real, Allocatable :: rc(:)

Allocate (sc(1))
Allocate (ic(1))
Allocate (rc(1))

sc = cassign (ra < rb, sa, sb)
ic = cassign (ra < rb, ia, ib)
rc = cassign (ra < rb, ra, rb)

This returns the following error

gfortran -o build/utests/test_foul.o -c -ffree-form -g -J./build/lib utests/test_foul.f utests/test_foul.f:315.7:

sc = cassign (ra < rb, sa, sb)
     1
Error: Can't convert CLASS(*) to CHARACTER(1) at (1)
utests/test_foul.f:316.7:

ic = cassign (ra < rb, ia, ib)
     1
Error: Can't convert CLASS(*) to INTEGER(4) at (1)
utests/test_foul.f:317.7:

  rc = cassign (ra < rb, ra, rb)
       1
Error: Can't convert CLASS(*) to REAL(4) at (1)



                                         1
Error: CLASS variable 'c' at (1) must be dummy, allocatable or pointer
lib/foul.f:495.10:

      c = a
      1

Error: Nonallocatable variable must not be polymorphic in intrinsic
assignment at (1) -    check that there is a matching specific subroutine 
for '=' operator
lib/foul.f:497.10:

      c = b
      1

Here is the function I have coded. The variables a and b can be any of the types Character, integer or real. And the output type should match the inputs a and b The function type_match (a, b) returns true if the two types match, false otherwise.

Function cassign (expr, a, b, wrn) Result (c)

  Logical, Intent(in) :: expr
  Class (*), Intent(in) :: a, b
  Logical, Intent (out), Optional :: wrn

  Class (*) :: c  

  Logical :: warn, tma, tmb 

  !!$ Perform warning tests (performs type matching).
  If (Present (wrn)) Then

    !!$ Matching input types. 
    tma = type_match (a, b)
    if (tma) Then

      tmb = type_match (a, c)

      !!$ Matching input and output types.
      If (tmb) Then
        If (expr) Then
          c = a
        Else
          c = b
        End If
        wrn = .False.

      !!$ Warning: Non-matching types.
      Else
        wrn = .True.
      End If

    Else

      wrn = .True.

    End If

  Else

    If (expr) Then
      c = a
    Else
      c = b
    End If

  End If

End Function cassign
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  • Have you tried making c allocatable (as the error message suggests)? Or are you trying to make it not, so that you can use the result in interesting ways? Nov 15, 2014 at 23:54
  • I am using gfortran 4.9 which is the latest.
    – Zeus
    Nov 15, 2014 at 23:57
  • lib/foul.f:497.10: c = a 1 Error: Assignment to an allocatable polymorphic variable at (1) is not yet supported
    – Zeus
    Nov 16, 2014 at 0:01
  • It seems to work. However I have to return an array and not just a variable.
    – Zeus
    Nov 16, 2014 at 0:14
  • gfortran -o build/utests/test_foul.o -c -ffree-form -g -J./build/lib utests/test_foul.f utests/test_foul.f:315.7: sc = cassign (ra < rb, sa, sb) 1 Error: Can't convert CLASS(*) to CHARACTER(1) at (1)
    – Zeus
    Nov 16, 2014 at 0:21

1 Answer 1

3

I am not sure that I recommend doing what I write below, preferring instead keeping to generics, but I will attempt to explain.

The first thing to note is that, as the error message states, for a non-dummy argument polymorphic variable (such as c) that variable must have the pointer or allocatable attribute. Here, it makes sense for the function result to be allocatable.

After adding the allocatable attribute, you seem to experience two things related to assignment of the allocatable polymorphic variable: once in the function setting the result, and once using the result of the function.

The version of gfortran you are using doesn't (apparently) support intrinsic assignment to polymorphic variables. You can use the equivalent, which arguably has the intention even clearer:

allocate (c, source=a)  ! You may also need to provide bounds for c
                        ! for some gfortran.

This is the solution to the assignment problem in the function.

With the function result, however, you are now returning a polymorphic result. That means that the variable taking the assignment must also be polymorphic, or the assignment must not be intrinsic. This is the

Error: Can't convert CLASS(*) to INTEGER(4) at (1)

error when you try intrinsic assignment.

Either make everything polymorphic, stick with generics, or use defined assignment. A simplified example follows for the latter case. [Adjust and extend as required.]

module hello_bob
  interface assignment(=)
    module procedure int_equal_func_class
  end interface

contains

  subroutine int_equal_func_class(a,b)
    integer, intent(out) :: a(:)
    class(*), intent(in) :: b(:)

    select type (b)
      type is (integer)
        a = b
    end select
  end subroutine int_equal_func_class

   function func(a)
     class(*), intent(in) :: a(:)
     class(*), allocatable :: func(:)

     ! No intrinsic assignment supported, also see note about bounds
     allocate(func, source=a)
   end function func

end module hello_bob

program bob
  use hello_bob
  integer i(4)

  i=func([1,2,3,4])
  print*, i

end program bob
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  • I was using generic before this new polymorphic idea evolved in my head.
    – Zeus
    Nov 16, 2014 at 0:38
  • Error: Assignment to an allocatable polymorphic variable at (1) is not yet supported
    – Zeus
    Nov 16, 2014 at 0:43
  • I am getting ahead of my time and shall stick with generic.
    – Zeus
    Nov 16, 2014 at 0:45
  • Also I do not want to have workarounds in my code. If it is not currently supported, I shall not use it. Else it creates complications that are not self evident. Additionally, once the feature becomes supported, the old code should not be allowed to exist anymore and just have the code that assigns to polymorphic variables.
    – Zeus
    Nov 16, 2014 at 0:52
  • I agree about bad workarounds, but in this case it isn't too bad (see comment inside). Also, adding defined assignment is about as much work as doing the generics, so I really would recommend going with the latter. Still, options are good. Nov 16, 2014 at 1:06

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