147

In EF6 we usually able to use this way to configure the Entity.

public class AccountMap : EntityTypeConfiguration<Account>
{
    public AccountMap()
    {
        ToTable("Account");
        HasKey(a => a.Id);

        Property(a => a.Username).HasMaxLength(50);
        Property(a => a.Email).HasMaxLength(255);
        Property(a => a.Name).HasMaxLength(255);
    }
}

How we can do in EF Core, since when the class I Inherit EntityTypeConfiguration that unable to find the class.

I download the EF Core raw source code from the GitHub, I can't find it. Can someone help on this?

3
  • 8
    Why not accept that answer?
    – Den
    Mar 11 '15 at 22:21
  • since it in beta5 now, when we put maxLength(50). in the db it generate nvarchar(max)
    – Herman
    Jul 15 '15 at 14:18
  • 7
    For anyone else interested in this, there is now an IEntityTypeConfiguration<T> with one void Configure() method that you can implement. Details here: github.com/aspnet/EntityFramework/pull/6989
    – Galilyou
    Feb 8 '17 at 15:53

16 Answers 16

222

Since EF Core 2.0 there is IEntityTypeConfiguration<TEntity>. You can use it like this:

class CustomerConfiguration : IEntityTypeConfiguration<Customer>
{
  public void Configure(EntityTypeBuilder<Customer> builder)
  {
     builder.HasKey(c => c.AlternateKey);
     builder.Property(c => c.Name).HasMaxLength(200);
   }
}

...
// OnModelCreating
builder.ApplyConfiguration(new CustomerConfiguration());

More on this and other new features introduced in 2.0 can be found here.

4
  • 9
    This is the best answer for EF Core 2.0. Thanks! Oct 27 '17 at 14:19
  • 2
    This is excellent. I was looking for a way to separate fluent API definitions. Thanks
    – Blaze
    May 20 '18 at 7:55
  • Also see this answer for "ToTable" and "HasColumnName ", etc ::: stackoverflow.com/questions/43200184/… Jan 6 '20 at 19:54
  • 6
    if you have man custom configuration, just put builder.ApplyConfigurationsFromAssembly(typeof(ApplicationDbContext).Assembly); it will apply all custom confirgurations
    – alim91
    Jul 24 '20 at 6:53
55

You can achieve this through some simple additional types:

internal static class ModelBuilderExtensions
{
   public static void AddConfiguration<TEntity>(
     this ModelBuilder modelBuilder, 
     DbEntityConfiguration<TEntity> entityConfiguration) where TEntity : class
   {     
       modelBuilder.Entity<TEntity>(entityConfiguration.Configure);
   }
}

internal abstract class DbEntityConfiguration<TEntity> where TEntity : class
{     
    public abstract void Configure(EntityTypeBuilder<TEntity> entity);
}

Usage:

internal class UserConfiguration : DbEntityConfiguration<UserDto>
{
    public override void Configure(EntityTypeBuilder<UserDto> entity)
    {
        entity.ToTable("User");
        entity.HasKey(c => c.Id);
        entity.Property(c => c.Username).HasMaxLength(255).IsRequired();
        // etc.
    }
}

protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);

    modelBuilder.AddConfiguration(new UserConfiguration());
}
5
  • 1
    Where is ForSqlServerToTable()?
    – im1dermike
    Mar 23 '17 at 14:01
  • 1
    This is now ToTable, see docs.microsoft.com/en-us/ef/core/modeling/relational/tables
    – devdigital
    Mar 29 '17 at 12:47
  • 1
    How to use HasColumnType with this ? . For eg. entity.Property(c => c.JoinDate).HasColumnType("date");
    – Biju Soman
    May 4 '17 at 7:06
  • 1
    OnModelCreating has been updated to require a DbModelBuilder. The way to add configurations to this is now modelBuilder.Configurations.Add(new UserConfiguration());
    – Izzy
    Feb 5 '18 at 14:46
  • 2
    @Izzy - DbModelBuilder is Entity Framework 6.0, ModelBuilder is EF Core. They are different assemblies and in this case the question was specific to EF Core.
    – Jason
    Feb 13 '18 at 10:12
32

In EF7, you override OnModelCreating on the DbContext class you're implementing.

protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);

        modelBuilder.Entity<Account>()
            .ForRelational(builder => builder.Table("Account"))
            .Property(value => value.Username).MaxLength(50)
            .Property(value => value.Email).MaxLength(255)
            .Property(value => value.Name).MaxLength(255);
    }
7
  • 27
    So if I have 20 entity type configurations I put them in one huge method?
    – Den
    Mar 9 '15 at 13:51
  • 6
    By default, it seems so. You can could make your own FooMapper/FooModelBuilder classes that extends a base class and has a method that you pass a typed EntityBuilder<Foo>. You could even use the new dependency injection and IConfiguration interface to have them discovered/called for you automatically, if you wanted to be fancy!
    – Avi Cherry
    Mar 9 '15 at 17:41
  • 1
    You're welcome. Up-voting an answer (and encouraging the questioner to accept it) is even better!
    – Avi Cherry
    Mar 11 '15 at 19:46
  • looks like the migration and the snapshot generate differently. Snapshot generate like this b.Property<string>("DisplayName") .Annotation("MaxLength", 50) .Annotation("OriginalValueIndex", 2); but in the migration is generate differently DisplayName = table.Column(type: "nvarchar(max)", nullable: true),
    – Herman
    Jun 27 '15 at 15:49
  • 4
    Try the new dependency injection tools? Make an IEntityMapperStrategy interface with a void MapEntity(ModelBuilder, Type) signature and bool IsFor(Type). Implement the interface as many or as few times as you want (so that you can make classes that can map more than one entity if you want) and then make another class (a strategy provider) that injects an IEnumerable of all of the IEntityMapperStrategies. See here under 'Special Types'. Inject that into your context.
    – Avi Cherry
    Nov 10 '15 at 23:53
23

This is using current latest, beta 8. Try this:

public class AccountMap
{
    public AccountMap(EntityTypeBuilder<Account> entityBuilder)
    {
        entityBuilder.HasKey(x => x.AccountId);

        entityBuilder.Property(x => x.AccountId).IsRequired();
        entityBuilder.Property(x => x.Username).IsRequired().HasMaxLength(50);
    }
}

Then in your DbContext:

    protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);

        new AccountMap(modelBuilder.Entity<Account>());
    }
2
  • 3
    I ended up doing similar to this. I decided to use a static method instead of a constructor though. Feb 1 '16 at 2:13
  • I'm using this methodology and up to this point I've had no issues except with inheritance. If I want to inherit the AccountMap in your example into a new one and add an alternate key - what would be the best approach?
    – chris
    Feb 28 '18 at 21:43
19

Since EF Core 2.2 you can add all configs (classes, which implemented IEntityTypeConfiguration interface) in one line in the method OnModelCreating in class, which is inherited from DbContext class

protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    //this will apply configs from separate classes which implemented IEntityTypeConfiguration<T>
    modelBuilder.ApplyConfigurationsFromAssembly(Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly());
}

And, as it was mentioned in the previous answer, since EF Core 2.0, you can implement the interface IEntityTypeConfiguration, setup mapping configuration with using FluentAPI in Configure method.

public class QuestionAnswerConfig : IEntityTypeConfiguration<QuestionAnswer>
{
    public void Configure(EntityTypeBuilder<QuestionAnswer> builder)
    {
      builder
        .HasKey(bc => new { bc.QuestionId, bc.AnswerId });
      builder
        .HasOne(bc => bc.Question)
        .WithMany(b => b.QuestionAnswers)
        .HasForeignKey(bc => bc.QuestionId);
      builder
        .HasOne(bc => bc.Answer)
        .WithMany(c => c.QuestionAnswers)
        .HasForeignKey(bc => bc.AnswerId);
    }
}
16

You can use reflection to do things very similarly to how they work in EF6, with a separate mapping class for each entity. This works in RC1 final:

First, create an interface for your mapping types:

public interface IEntityTypeConfiguration<TEntityType> where TEntityType : class
{
    void Map(EntityTypeBuilder<TEntityType> builder);
}

Then create a mapping class for each of your entities, e.g. for a Person class:

public class PersonMap : IEntityTypeConfiguration<Person>
{
    public void Map(EntityTypeBuilder<Person> builder)
    {
        builder.HasKey(x => x.Id);
        builder.Property(x => x.Name).IsRequired().HasMaxLength(100);
    }
}

Now, the reflection magic in OnModelCreating in your DbContext implementation:

protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder builder)
{
    base.OnModelCreating(builder);

    // Interface that all of our Entity maps implement
    var mappingInterface = typeof(IEntityTypeConfiguration<>);

    // Types that do entity mapping
    var mappingTypes = typeof(DataContext).GetTypeInfo().Assembly.GetTypes()
        .Where(x => x.GetInterfaces().Any(y => y.GetTypeInfo().IsGenericType && y.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == mappingInterface));

    // Get the generic Entity method of the ModelBuilder type
    var entityMethod = typeof(ModelBuilder).GetMethods()
        .Single(x => x.Name == "Entity" && 
                x.IsGenericMethod && 
                x.ReturnType.Name == "EntityTypeBuilder`1");

    foreach (var mappingType in mappingTypes)
    {
        // Get the type of entity to be mapped
        var genericTypeArg = mappingType.GetInterfaces().Single().GenericTypeArguments.Single();

        // Get the method builder.Entity<TEntity>
        var genericEntityMethod = entityMethod.MakeGenericMethod(genericTypeArg);

        // Invoke builder.Entity<TEntity> to get a builder for the entity to be mapped
        var entityBuilder = genericEntityMethod.Invoke(builder, null);

        // Create the mapping type and do the mapping
        var mapper = Activator.CreateInstance(mappingType);
        mapper.GetType().GetMethod("Map").Invoke(mapper, new[] { entityBuilder });
    }
}
2
  • What reference does the DataContext and .Where use? I made a separate project for this and don't seem to find the reference.
    – Ruchan
    Jun 1 '16 at 16:01
  • .Where is System.Linq, DataContext is the class where the code is added (my EF DbContext impl)
    – Cocowalla
    Mar 16 '19 at 14:26
6

This is what I am doing in a project I'm currently working on.

public interface IEntityMappingConfiguration<T> where T : class
{
    void Map(EntityTypeBuilder<T> builder);
}

public static class EntityMappingExtensions
{
     public static ModelBuilder RegisterEntityMapping<TEntity, TMapping>(this ModelBuilder builder) 
        where TMapping : IEntityMappingConfiguration<TEntity> 
        where TEntity : class
    {
        var mapper = (IEntityMappingConfiguration<TEntity>)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof (TMapping));
        mapper.Map(builder.Entity<TEntity>());
        return builder;
    }
}

Usage:

In your Context's OnModelCreating method:

    protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder builder)
    {
        base.OnModelCreating(builder);

        builder
            .RegisterEntityMapping<Card, CardMapping>()
            .RegisterEntityMapping<User, UserMapping>();
    }

Example mapping class:

public class UserMapping : IEntityMappingConfiguration<User>
{
    public void Map(EntityTypeBuilder<User> builder)
    {
        builder.ToTable("User");
        builder.HasKey(m => m.Id);
        builder.Property(m => m.Id).HasColumnName("UserId");
        builder.Property(m => m.FirstName).IsRequired().HasMaxLength(64);
        builder.Property(m => m.LastName).IsRequired().HasMaxLength(64);
        builder.Property(m => m.DateOfBirth);
        builder.Property(m => m.MobileNumber).IsRequired(false);
    }
}

One other thing I like to do to take advantage of the folding behavior of Visual Studio 2015 is for an Entity called 'User', you name your mapping file 'User.Mapping.cs', Visual Studio will fold the file in the solution explorer so that it is contained under the entity class file.

2
  • Thank you for your solution. I will optimize my solution code on the end of my project... I check it sure in future. Jul 8 '16 at 18:12
  • I can only assume 'IEntityTypeConfiguration<T>' and Configure(builder) didn't exist in 2016? With a slight change of wiring to point to TypeConfiguration, there's no need for the 'extra' interface.
    – WernerCD
    Jan 14 '20 at 20:00
3

I ended with this solution:

public interface IEntityMappingConfiguration
{
    void Map(ModelBuilder b);
}

public interface IEntityMappingConfiguration<T> : IEntityMappingConfiguration where T : class
{
    void Map(EntityTypeBuilder<T> builder);
}

public abstract class EntityMappingConfiguration<T> : IEntityMappingConfiguration<T> where T : class
{
    public abstract void Map(EntityTypeBuilder<T> b);

    public void Map(ModelBuilder b)
    {
        Map(b.Entity<T>());
    }
}

public static class ModelBuilderExtenions
{
    private static IEnumerable<Type> GetMappingTypes(this Assembly assembly, Type mappingInterface)
    {
        return assembly.GetTypes().Where(x => !x.IsAbstract && x.GetInterfaces().Any(y => y.GetTypeInfo().IsGenericType && y.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == mappingInterface));
    }

    public static void AddEntityConfigurationsFromAssembly(this ModelBuilder modelBuilder, Assembly assembly)
    {
        var mappingTypes = assembly.GetMappingTypes(typeof (IEntityMappingConfiguration<>));
        foreach (var config in mappingTypes.Select(Activator.CreateInstance).Cast<IEntityMappingConfiguration>())
        {
            config.Map(modelBuilder);
        }
    }
}

Sample Use:

public abstract class PersonConfiguration : EntityMappingConfiguration<Person>
{
    public override void Map(EntityTypeBuilder<Person> b)
    {
        b.ToTable("Person", "HumanResources")
            .HasKey(p => p.PersonID);

        b.Property(p => p.FirstName).HasMaxLength(50).IsRequired();
        b.Property(p => p.MiddleName).HasMaxLength(50);
        b.Property(p => p.LastName).HasMaxLength(50).IsRequired();
    }
}

and

protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    modelBuilder.AddEntityConfigurationsFromAssembly(GetType().Assembly);
}
3
  • I'm getting a compile-time error: "Operator '!x.IsAbstract' cannot be applied to operand of type 'method group'" on '!x.IsAbstract' (System.Type.IsAbstract) in ModelBuilderExtenions.GetMappingTypes(). Do I need to add a reference to mscorlib? How do I do that to a .NET Core 1.0 project? Sep 13 '16 at 17:39
  • for .net core projects (using netstandard) you need to use the extension GetTypeInfo() in the System.Reflection namespace. Use as x.GetTypeInfo().IsAbstract or x.GetTypeInfo().GetInterfaces() Mar 21 '17 at 9:02
  • I've used part of your solution on mine and it's worked nice. Thanks! Feb 9 '18 at 18:01
2

Just implement the IEntityTypeConfiguration

public abstract class EntityTypeConfiguration<TEntity> : IEntityTypeConfiguration<TEntity> where TEntity : class
{
    public abstract void Configure(EntityTypeBuilder<TEntity> builder);
}

and then add it to your entity Context

public class ProductContext : DbContext, IDbContext
{
    public ProductContext(DbContextOptions<ProductContext> options)
        : base((DbContextOptions)options)
    {
    }

    protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);
        modelBuilder.ApplyConfiguration(new ProductMap());
    }

    public DbSet<Entities.Product> Products { get; set; }
}
1

In ef core we have to impelement IEntityTypeConfiguration instead of EntityTypeConfiguration in this case we have full access to DbContext modelBuilder and we can use fluent api but in ef core this api is a litle bit diferent from previous versions. you can find more details on ef core model configuration on

https://www.learnentityframeworkcore.com/configuration/fluent-api

1

In Entity Framework Core 2.0:

I took Cocowalla's answer and adapted it for v2.0:

    public static class ModelBuilderExtenions
    {
        private static IEnumerable<Type> GetMappingTypes(this Assembly assembly, Type mappingInterface)
        {
            return assembly.GetTypes().Where(x => !x.IsAbstract && x.GetInterfaces().Any(y => y.GetTypeInfo().IsGenericType && y.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == mappingInterface));
        }

        public static void AddEntityConfigurationsFromAssembly(this ModelBuilder modelBuilder, Assembly assembly)
        {
            // Types that do entity mapping
            var mappingTypes = assembly.GetMappingTypes(typeof(IEntityTypeConfiguration<>));

            // Get the generic Entity method of the ModelBuilder type
            var entityMethod = typeof(ModelBuilder).GetMethods()
                .Single(x => x.Name == "Entity" &&
                        x.IsGenericMethod &&
                        x.ReturnType.Name == "EntityTypeBuilder`1");

            foreach (var mappingType in mappingTypes)
            {
                // Get the type of entity to be mapped
                var genericTypeArg = mappingType.GetInterfaces().Single().GenericTypeArguments.Single();

                // Get the method builder.Entity<TEntity>
                var genericEntityMethod = entityMethod.MakeGenericMethod(genericTypeArg);

                // Invoke builder.Entity<TEntity> to get a builder for the entity to be mapped
                var entityBuilder = genericEntityMethod.Invoke(modelBuilder, null);

                // Create the mapping type and do the mapping
                var mapper = Activator.CreateInstance(mappingType);
                mapper.GetType().GetMethod("Configure").Invoke(mapper, new[] { entityBuilder });
            }
        }


    }

And it's used in the DbContext like this:

    protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        modelBuilder.AddEntityConfigurationsFromAssembly(GetType().Assembly);
    }

And this is how you create an entity type configuration for an entity:

    public class UserUserRoleEntityTypeConfiguration : IEntityTypeConfiguration<UserUserRole>
    {
        public void Configure(EntityTypeBuilder<UserUserRole> builder)
        {
            builder.ToTable("UserUserRole");
            // compound PK
            builder.HasKey(p => new { p.UserId, p.UserRoleId });
        }
    }
2
  • Didn't work for me. Exception: Late bound operations cannot be performed on types or methods for which ContainsGenericParameters is true.
    – Tohid
    Jan 14 '19 at 15:42
  • PS: Found the solution: && !t.IsGenericType. Because I had a base class that is a generic one (class EntityTypeConfigurationBase<TEntity> : IEntityTypeConfiguration<TEntity>). You can't make an instance of this base class.
    – Tohid
    Jan 14 '19 at 15:54
1
      public class Student
    {
        public int Id { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public int RollNumber { get; set; }
        public string Address { get; set; }
    }
    
    public class StudentMapper : IEntityTypeConfiguration<Student>
    {
        public void Configure(EntityTypeBuilder<Student> builder)
        {
            builder.ToTable("tbl_Students");
            builder.HasKey(x => x.Id);
            builder.Property(x => x.Address)
                        .HasMaxLength(250);
            builder.Property(x => x.Name)
                     .HasMaxLength(50);

            builder.Property(x => x.Name).HasColumnName("varchar_name");
        }

        
    }
    
     public class DataContext : DbContext
    {
        public DataContext(DbContextOptions options): base(options)
        {
                
        }
        public DbSet<Student> Students { get; set; }
        //DbSets
        protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder) {
            //for fluent API approach and also we can create a separate mapper for each entity
            #region student
                        
          
            modelBuilder.ApplyConfiguration(new StudentMapper());
            #endregion
        }
    }
0

Am I right?

public class SmartModelBuilder<T> where T : class         {

    private ModelBuilder _builder { get; set; }
    private Action<EntityTypeBuilder<T>> _entityAction { get; set; }

    public SmartModelBuilder(ModelBuilder builder, Action<EntityTypeBuilder<T>> entityAction)
    {
        this._builder = builder;
        this._entityAction = entityAction;

        this._builder.Entity<T>(_entityAction);
    }
}   

I can Pass config:

 protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder builder)
    {
        base.OnModelCreating(builder);
        // Customize the ASP.NET Identity model and override the defaults if needed.
        // For example, you can rename the ASP.NET Identity table names and more.
        // Add your customizations after calling base.OnModelCreating(builder);



        new SmartModelBuilder<Blog>(builder, entity => entity.Property(b => b.Url).Required());

    } 
1
  • The accepted answer seems better than this. Both have the same negative side-effect of having a massively cluttered OnModelCreating() but the accepted answer doesn't require any helper classes. Is there something I'm missing that your answer improves? Nov 6 '15 at 22:20
0

I followed a similar approach to the way Microsoft implemented ForSqlServerToTable

using extension method...

the partial flag is required if you want to use the same class name in multiple files

public class ConsignorUser
{
    public int ConsignorId { get; set; }

    public string UserId { get; set; }

    public virtual Consignor Consignor { get; set; }
    public virtual User User { get; set; }

}

public static partial class Entity_FluentMappings
{
    public static EntityTypeBuilder<ConsignorUser> AddFluentMapping<TEntity> (
        this EntityTypeBuilder<ConsignorUser> entityTypeBuilder) 
        where TEntity : ConsignorUser
    {
       entityTypeBuilder.HasKey(x => new { x.ConsignorId, x.UserId });
       return entityTypeBuilder;
    }      
}

Then in the DataContext OnModelCreating make your call for each extension...

 public class DataContext : IdentityDbContext<User>
{

    protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder builder)
    {
        base.OnModelCreating(builder);
        // Customize the ASP.NET Identity model and override the defaults if needed.
        // For example, you can rename the ASP.NET Identity table names and more.
        // Add your customizations after calling base.OnModelCreating(builder);

        builder.Entity<ConsignorUser>().AddFluentMapping<ConsignorUser>();
        builder.Entity<DealerUser>().AddFluentMapping<DealerUser>();           

    }

This way we are following the same pattern used by the other builder methods.

What do you thing?

0

Well here is the issue for the enhancement on the EF7 Github repo: https://github.com/aspnet/EntityFramework/issues/2805

You can track the issue directly there, altough its is still only in backlog without designated priority.

1
  • There should be an issue like "Stop breaking well designed things".
    – Kamil
    Nov 26 '19 at 16:18
0

I have a project that allows you to configure entities outside of the DbContext.OnModelCreating You configure each entity in a seperate class which inherits from StaticDotNet.EntityFrameworkCore.ModelConfiguration.EntityTypeConfiguration

First you need to create a class which inherits from StaticDotNet.EntityFrameworkCore.ModelConfiguration.EntityTypeConfiguration<TEntity> where TEntity is the class you want to configure.

using StaticDotNet.EntityFrameworkCore.ModelConfiguration;
using Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Metadata.Builders;

public class ExampleEntityConfiguration
    : EntityTypeConfiguration<ExampleEntity>
{
    public override void Configure( EntityTypeBuilder<ExampleEntity> builder )
    {
        //Add configuration just like you do in DbContext.OnModelCreating
    }
}

Then in your Startup class you just need to tell Entity Framework where to find all of your configuration classes when you are configuring your DbContext.

using StaticDotNet.EntityFrameworkCore.ModelConfiguration;

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    Assembly[] assemblies = new Assembly[]
    {
        // Add your assembiles here.
    };

    services.AddDbContext<ExampleDbContext>( x => x
        .AddEntityTypeConfigurations( assemblies )
    );
}

There is also an option for adding type configurations using a provider. The repo has complete documentation on how to use it.

https://github.com/john-t-white/StaticDotNet.EntityFrameworkCore.ModelConfiguration

1
  • Please do not post the same answer to multiple questions. If the same information really answers both questions, then one question (usually the newer one) should be closed as a duplicate of the other. You can indicate this by voting to close it as a duplicate or, if you don't have enough reputation for that, raise a flag to indicate that it's a duplicate. Otherwise, be sure you tailor your answer to this question and don't just paste the same answer in multiple places.
    – elixenide
    Nov 29 '16 at 15:59

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