3

I am experimenting with F# and as such have decided to use F# as the service layer for a new project. Now I am trying to map an entity to an F# type but am getting nowhere! Problem seems to be the Select clause.

In the below example IDataContext is an entity framework unit of work with a person DbSet (defined in a C# project)

interface IDataContext
{
     DbSet<Person> Persons { get; }
}

Method one

[<CLIMutable>]
type Person = {
    Id: int
    Name: string
}

type PersonService(context: IDataContext)
    member this.GetPerson(personId) = 
        let person = context.Persons
                            .Where(fun p -> p.Id = personId)
                            .Select(fun p -> { Id = p.Id; Name = p.Name })
                            .FirstOrDefaultAsync()
        person

Problem that seems to occur here is that linq complains that a parameterless constructor is required. So I tried another way

type public Person() =
    [<DefaultValue>] val mutable Id : int
    [<DefaultValue>] val mutable Name : string

type PersonService(context: IDataContext)
    member this.GetPerson(personId) = 
        let person = context.Persons
                            .Where(fun p -> p.Id = personId)
                            .Select(fun p -> new Person(Id = p.Id, Name = p.Name))
                            .FirstOrDefaultAsync()
        person

and now I get

could not convert the following f# quotation to a linq expression tree

Do I have to convert the fun into an expression? I thought F# 3.0 already did that?

Edit

In the last example I just tried Select(fun p -> new Person()) and it works. So the way it is initializing the properties is bad? What would the corresponding C# of fun p -> new Person(Id = p.Id, Name = p.Name) be?

  • F#: fun p -> new Person(Id = p.Id, Name = p.Name), C#: p => new Person { Id = p.Id, Name = p.Name } – Christopher Stevenson Nov 17 '14 at 8:49
  • If that is the case then why is it complaining when I try to initialize the person record with properties? Thats just standard object property initialization which of course LINQ supports. – Umair Nov 17 '14 at 9:47
  • Because the 'properties' of records are read-only in F# Sharp, even with the CLIMutable attribute. – Christopher Stevenson Nov 17 '14 at 10:56
  • The upshot if this is you have two choices: keep the record, and use a async workflow to transfer the entity to the record after it comes back; or use a normal class type with get and set properties to pass to Entity Framework. (Well, someone could extend Entity Framework to understand F# Quotations, I suppose.) – Christopher Stevenson Nov 17 '14 at 11:00
1

If you want to use LINQ and asynchronous queries, you need a work around since LINQ select doesn't support records, and you need to use an async workflow:

type PersonService(context: IDataContext)
member this.GetPerson(personId) = 
    async {
        // get the actual context object
        let! person = Async.AwaitTask  
                         (context.Persons
                                 .Where(fun p -> p.Id = personId)
                                 .FirstOrDefaultAsync()))

        // map context object, if it's not null
        if obj.ReferenceEquals(person, null)
            then return None
            else return Some ({ Id = person .Id; Name = person .Name })
    } |> Async.StartAsTask

It's worth noting that LINQ and query expressions can have null returns, you have to handle the nulls at some point. I prefer translating them to options as soon as possible. Also, I'm converting the Async object to a hot Task, with Async.StartAsTask.

Edit:

For restricting the size of the return entity, I think this would work (I don't have the time right now to test this fully):

type PersonService(context: IDataContext) =
    member this.GetPerson(personId) = 
        async {
            // get the actual context object
            let! person = Async.AwaitTask
                           (query { for p in context.Persons do
                                    where (p.Id = personId)
                                    select (p.Id, p.Name)
                            }).FirstOrDefaultAsync()

            // map context object, if it's not null
            if obj.ReferenceEquals(person, null)
                then return None
                else return person |> (fun (id, name) -> Some ({ Id = id; Name = name }))
        } |> Async.StartAsTask
  • The problem I have here is that I would have to load up the entire person entity and then map it to the F# Person record. Can I use an anonymous type? – Umair Nov 17 '14 at 9:44
  • Are you using SQL Server? If so, take a look at FSharp.Data.SqlClient. – Christopher Stevenson Nov 17 '14 at 15:11
  • Thanks Christopher (for all your help). Yes I am using SQL. I will take a look at that :) – Umair Nov 17 '14 at 18:17
  • @ChristopherStevenson: The FSharp.Data.SqlClient is fine for disposable scripts but it is bad for production code. With it our compile times grew to over 5 minutes for a few hundred lines of code so we've stripped it out of all production code now. I believe there is a better unofficial type provider called SqlProvider that is supposed to fix these kinds of bugs but I haven't tried it. – Jon Harrop Sep 24 '17 at 2:27
  • Generally, with type providers, the size of the input data determines how long the type provider takes to compile. I would recommend having a minimal database for efficient compilation. – Christopher Stevenson Oct 13 '17 at 20:22
0

Have you tried defining Person like this, with properties instead of fields:

type Person() =
    member val Id = Unchecked.defaultof<int> with get, set    
    member val Name = Unchecked.defaultof<String> with get, set

You can use F# query expression for querying against EF, like this:

let person =
    query {
        for p in context.Persons do
        where (p.Id = personId)
        select p }
    |> Seq.head

(You may have to fiddle with the above to get it to work, but that should be the gist of it.)

  • Properties throw the same error when used with the Select function above. I haven't tried the query block, the only problem I have with that is I will lose the linq asynchronous extension methods? – Umair Nov 16 '14 at 20:45

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