162

I want to replace my CI bash scripts with swift. I can't figure out how to invoke normal terminal command such as ls or xcodebuild

#!/usr/bin/env xcrun swift

import Foundation // Works
println("Test") // Works
ls // Fails
xcodebuild -workspace myApp.xcworkspace // Fails

$ ./script.swift
./script.swift:5:1: error: use of unresolved identifier 'ls'
ls // Fails
^
... etc ....

17 Answers 17

221

If you would like to use command line arguments "exactly" as you would in command line (without separating all the arguments), try the following.

(This answer improves off of LegoLess's answer and can be used in Swift 5)

import Foundation

func shell(_ command: String) -> String {
    let task = Process()
    let pipe = Pipe()
    
    task.standardOutput = pipe
    task.standardError = pipe
    task.arguments = ["-c", command]
    task.launchPath = "/bin/zsh"
    task.standardInput = nil
    task.launch()
    
    let data = pipe.fileHandleForReading.readDataToEndOfFile()
    let output = String(data: data, encoding: .utf8)!
    
    return output
}

// Example usage:
shell("ls -la")

Updated / safer function calls 10/23/21: It's possible to run into a runtime error with the above shell command and if so, try swapping to the updated calls below. You'll need to use a do catch statement around the new shell command but hopefully this saves you some time searching for a way to catch unexpected error(s) too.

Explanation: Since task.launch() isn't a throwing function it cannot be caught and I was finding it to occasionally simply crash the app when called. After much internet searching, I found the Process class has deprecated task.launch() in favor of a newer function task.run() which does throw errors properly w/out crashing the app. To find out more about the updated methods, please see: https://eclecticlight.co/2019/02/02/scripting-in-swift-process-deprecations/

import Foundation

@discardableResult // Add to suppress warnings when you don't want/need a result
func safeShell(_ command: String) throws -> String {
    let task = Process()
    let pipe = Pipe()
    
    task.standardOutput = pipe
    task.standardError = pipe
    task.arguments = ["-c", command]
    task.executableURL = URL(fileURLWithPath: "/bin/zsh") //<--updated
    task.standardInput = nil

    try task.run() //<--updated
    
    let data = pipe.fileHandleForReading.readDataToEndOfFile()
    let output = String(data: data, encoding: .utf8)!
    
    return output
}

Examples:

// Example usage capturing error:
do {
    try safeShell("ls -la")
}
catch {
    print("\(error)") //handle or silence the error here
}

// Example usage where you don't care about the error and want a nil back instead
let result = try? safeShell("ls -la")

// Example usage where you don't care about the error or the return value
try? safeShell("ls -la")

Note: For the last case where you are using try? and aren't using the result, for some reason the compiler still warns you even though it's marked as @discardableResult. This only happens with try?, not try within a do-try-catch block or from within a throwing function. Either way, you can safely ignore it.

8
  • 14
    This answer should really be much higher up as it solves many of the issues of the previous ones. Commented Aug 7, 2018 at 21:38
  • 1
    +1. It should be noted for osx users that /bin/bash refers to bash-3.2. If you want to use bash's more advanced features, change the path (/usr/bin/env bash usually is a good alternative)
    – Aserre
    Commented Apr 12, 2019 at 14:15
  • Anyone can help with this? Arguments don't pass stackoverflow.com/questions/62203978/…
    – mahdi
    Commented Jun 5, 2020 at 0:32
  • 1
    Great snippet! One minor note: since the function already throws, you don't need the do .. try .. catch block, just use try task.run() Commented Feb 12, 2022 at 16:15
  • 2
    You should also add task.standardInput = nil before task.run() is called. This can be painfully hard to diagnose, since the kernel will silently stop the child process if it attempts to read from stdin. This can be subtle because the child can be doing useful work while monitoring stdin for input. The moment you type something on the keyboard, the child sees that there's input waiting and calls read(). The kernel responds by sending a SIGSTOP and the child freezes. I'm. kind of surprised that this isn't the default for Process().
    – Jim Hayes
    Commented Apr 28, 2022 at 6:15
161

If you don't use command outputs in Swift code, following would be sufficient:

#!/usr/bin/env swift

import Foundation

@discardableResult
func shell(_ args: String...) -> Int32 {
    let task = Process()
    task.launchPath = "/usr/bin/env"
    task.arguments = args
    task.launch()
    task.waitUntilExit()
    return task.terminationStatus
}

shell("ls")
shell("xcodebuild", "-workspace", "myApp.xcworkspace")

Updated: for Swift3/Xcode8

13
  • 7
    'NSTask' has been renamed to 'Process'
    – Mateusz
    Commented Oct 18, 2016 at 13:53
  • 5
    Is Process() still in Swift 4? I'm getting an undefined symbol. :/ Commented Sep 22, 2017 at 15:22
  • 1
    @ArnaldoCapo It still works fine for me! Here's an example: #!/usr/bin/env swift import Foundation @discardableResult func shell(_ args: String...) -> Int32 { let task = Process() task.launchPath = "/usr/bin/env" task.arguments = args task.launch() task.waitUntilExit() return task.terminationStatus } shell("ls")
    – cor
    Commented Oct 5, 2017 at 8:21
  • 4
    I tried that I got : I tried that I got : i.imgur.com/Ge1OOCG.png
    – code-8
    Commented Dec 12, 2018 at 17:10
  • 7
    Process is available on macOS only Commented Aug 22, 2019 at 11:11
39

The problem here is that you cannot mix and match Bash and Swift. You already know how to run Swift script from command line, now you need to add the methods to execute Shell commands in Swift. In summary from PracticalSwift blog:

func shell(_ launchPath: String, _ arguments: [String]) -> String?
{
    let task = Process()
    task.launchPath = launchPath
    task.arguments = arguments

    let pipe = Pipe()
    task.standardOutput = pipe
    task.launch()

    let data = pipe.fileHandleForReading.readDataToEndOfFile()
    let output = String(data: data, encoding: String.Encoding.utf8)

    return output
}

The following Swift code will execute xcodebuild with arguments and then output the result.

shell("xcodebuild", ["-workspace", "myApp.xcworkspace"]);

As for searching the directory contents (which is what ls does in Bash), I suggest using NSFileManager and scanning the directory directly in Swift, instead of Bash output, which can be a pain to parse.

6
  • 1
    Great - I made a few edits to make this compile, however I am getting a runtime exception when trying to invoke shell("ls", []) - 'NSInvalidArgumentException', reason: 'launch path not accessible' Any ideas?
    – Robert
    Commented Nov 17, 2014 at 12:17
  • 6
    NSTask does not search the executable (using your PATH from the environment) as the shell does. The launch path must be an absolute path (e.g. "/bin/ls") or a path relative to the current working directory.
    – Martin R
    Commented Nov 17, 2014 at 12:33
  • stackoverflow.com/questions/386783/… PATH is basically a shell's concept and not reachable.
    – Legoless
    Commented Nov 17, 2014 at 12:47
  • Great - it works now. I posted the full script + a few modifications for completeness. Thank you.
    – Robert
    Commented Nov 17, 2014 at 13:01
  • 2
    Using shell("cd", "~/Desktop/") , I get: /usr/bin/cd: line 4: cd: ~/Desktop/: No such file or directory Commented Aug 29, 2017 at 23:51
24

Utility function In Swift 3.0

This also returns the tasks termination status and waits for completion.

func shell(launchPath: String, arguments: [String] = []) -> (String? , Int32) {
    let task = Process()
    task.launchPath = launchPath
    task.arguments = arguments

    let pipe = Pipe()
    task.standardOutput = pipe
    task.standardError = pipe
    task.launch()
    let data = pipe.fileHandleForReading.readDataToEndOfFile()
    let output = String(data: data, encoding: .utf8)
    task.waitUntilExit()
    return (output, task.terminationStatus)
}
2
  • 5
    import Foundation missing
    – Binarian
    Commented Oct 5, 2016 at 10:23
  • 4
    Sadly, not for iOS.
    – Raphael
    Commented Mar 27, 2017 at 8:26
18

Just to update this since Apple has deprecated both .launchPath and launch(), here's an updated utility function for Swift 4 that should be a little more future proof.

Note: Apple's documentation on the replacements (run(), executableURL, etc) are basically empty at this point.

import Foundation

// wrapper function for shell commands
// must provide full path to executable
func shell(_ launchPath: String, _ arguments: [String] = []) -> (String?, Int32) {
  let task = Process()
  task.executableURL = URL(fileURLWithPath: launchPath)
  task.arguments = arguments

  let pipe = Pipe()
  task.standardOutput = pipe
  task.standardError = pipe

  do {
    try task.run()
  } catch {
    // handle errors
    print("Error: \(error.localizedDescription)")
  }

  let data = pipe.fileHandleForReading.readDataToEndOfFile()
  let output = String(data: data, encoding: .utf8)

  task.waitUntilExit()
  return (output, task.terminationStatus)
}


// valid directory listing test
let (goodOutput, goodStatus) = shell("/bin/ls", ["-la"])
if let out = goodOutput { print("\(out)") }
print("Returned \(goodStatus)\n")

// invalid test
let (badOutput, badStatus) = shell("ls")

Should be able to paste this directly into a playground to see it in action.

1
  • 2
    Works OK in a Swift 5 playground provided the Playground Settings Platform is "macOS". The "iOS" playground platform gets a "Cannot find 'Process' in scope" error message. Commented Jun 23, 2021 at 7:24
17

If you'd like to use the bash environment for calling commands use the following bash function which uses a fixed up version of Legoless. I had to remove a trailing newline from the shell function's result.

Swift 3.0:(Xcode8)

import Foundation

func shell(launchPath: String, arguments: [String]) -> String
{
    let task = Process()
    task.launchPath = launchPath
    task.arguments = arguments

    let pipe = Pipe()
    task.standardOutput = pipe
    task.launch()

    let data = pipe.fileHandleForReading.readDataToEndOfFile()
    let output = String(data: data, encoding: String.Encoding.utf8)!
    if output.characters.count > 0 {
        //remove newline character.
        let lastIndex = output.index(before: output.endIndex)
        return output[output.startIndex ..< lastIndex]
    }
    return output
}

func bash(command: String, arguments: [String]) -> String {
    let whichPathForCommand = shell(launchPath: "/bin/bash", arguments: [ "-l", "-c", "which \(command)" ])
    return shell(launchPath: whichPathForCommand, arguments: arguments)
}

For example to get the current working git branch of the current working directory:

let currentBranch = bash("git", arguments: ["describe", "--contains", "--all", "HEAD"])
print("current branch:\(currentBranch)")
0
14

Full script based on Legoless's answer

#!/usr/bin/env swift

import Foundation

func printShell(launchPath: String, arguments: [String] = []) {
    let output = shell(launchPath: launchPath, arguments: arguments)

    if (output != nil) {
        print(output!)
    }
}

func shell(launchPath: String, arguments: [String] = []) -> String? {
    let task = Process()
    task.launchPath = launchPath
    task.arguments = arguments

    let pipe = Pipe()
    task.standardOutput = pipe
    task.launch()

    let data = pipe.fileHandleForReading.readDataToEndOfFile()
    let output = String(data: data, encoding: String.Encoding.utf8)

    return output
}

// > ls
// > ls -a -g
printShell(launchPath: "/bin/ls")
printShell(launchPath: "/bin/ls", arguments:["-a", "-g"])
0
8

Updating for Swift 4.0 (dealing with changes to String)

func shell(launchPath: String, arguments: [String]) -> String
{
    let task = Process()
    task.launchPath = launchPath
    task.arguments = arguments

    let pipe = Pipe()
    task.standardOutput = pipe
    task.launch()

    let data = pipe.fileHandleForReading.readDataToEndOfFile()
    let output = String(data: data, encoding: String.Encoding.utf8)!
    if output.count > 0 {
        //remove newline character.
        let lastIndex = output.index(before: output.endIndex)
        return String(output[output.startIndex ..< lastIndex])
    }
    return output
}

func bash(command: String, arguments: [String]) -> String {
    let whichPathForCommand = shell(launchPath: "/bin/bash", arguments: [ "-l", "-c", "which \(command)" ])
    return shell(launchPath: whichPathForCommand, arguments: arguments)
}
1
7

After trying some of the solutions posted here, I found that the best way to execute commands was using the -c flag for the arguments.

@discardableResult func shell(_ command: String) -> (String?, Int32) {
    let task = Process()

    task.launchPath = "/bin/bash"
    task.arguments = ["-c", command]

    let pipe = Pipe()
    task.standardOutput = pipe
    task.standardError = pipe
    task.launch()

    let data = pipe.fileHandleForReading.readDataToEndOfFile()
    let output = String(data: data, encoding: .utf8)
    task.waitUntilExit()
    return (output, task.terminationStatus)
}


let _ = shell("mkdir ~/Desktop/test")
4
import Foundation

enum Commands {
  struct Result {
    public let statusCode: Int32
    public let output: String
  }
  
  static func run(_ command: String,
                  environment: [String: String]? = nil,
                  executableURL: String = "/bin/bash",
                  dashc: String = "-c") -> Result {
    // create process
    func create(_ executableURL: String,
                dashc: String,
                environment: [String: String]?) -> Process {
      let process = Process()
      if #available(macOS 10.13, *) {
        process.executableURL = URL(fileURLWithPath: executableURL)
      } else {
        process.launchPath = "/bin/bash"
      }
      if let environment = environment {
        process.environment = environment
      }
      process.arguments = [dashc, command]
      return process
    }
    // run process
    func run(_ process: Process) throws {
      if #available(macOS 10.13, *) {
        try process.run()
      } else {
        process.launch()
      }
      process.waitUntilExit()
    }
    // read data
    func fileHandleData(fileHandle: FileHandle) throws -> String? {
      var outputData: Data?
      if #available(macOS 10.15.4, *) {
        outputData = try fileHandle.readToEnd()
      } else {
        outputData = fileHandle.readDataToEndOfFile()
      }
      if let outputData = outputData {
        return String(data: outputData, encoding: .utf8)?.trimmingCharacters(in: .whitespacesAndNewlines)
      }
      return nil
    }
    
    let process = create(executableURL, dashc: dashc, environment: environment)
    
    let outputPipe = Pipe()
    process.standardOutput = outputPipe
    
    let errorPipe = Pipe()
    process.standardError = errorPipe
    
    do {
      try run(process)
      
      let outputActual = try fileHandleData(fileHandle: outputPipe.fileHandleForReading) ?? ""
      let errorActual = try fileHandleData(fileHandle: errorPipe.fileHandleForReading) ?? ""
      
      if process.terminationStatus == EXIT_SUCCESS {
        return Result(statusCode: process.terminationStatus, output: outputActual)
      }
      return Result(statusCode: process.terminationStatus, output: errorActual)
    } catch let error {
      return Result(statusCode: process.terminationStatus, output: error.localizedDescription)
    }
  }
}

Usage

let result = Commands.run("ls")
debugPrint(result.output)
debugPrint(result.statusCode)

or using swift-commands

import Commands

Commands.Bash.system("ls")
0

Mixing rintaro and Legoless's answers for Swift 3

@discardableResult
func shell(_ args: String...) -> String {
    let task = Process()
    task.launchPath = "/usr/bin/env"
    task.arguments = args

    let pipe = Pipe()
    task.standardOutput = pipe

    task.launch()
    task.waitUntilExit()

    let data = pipe.fileHandleForReading.readDataToEndOfFile()

    guard let output: String = String(data: data, encoding: .utf8) else {
        return ""
    }
    return output
}
0

Small improvement with the support for env variables:

func shell(launchPath: String,
           arguments: [String] = [],
           environment: [String : String]? = nil) -> (String , Int32) {
    let task = Process()
    task.launchPath = launchPath
    task.arguments = arguments
    if let environment = environment {
        task.environment = environment
    }

    let pipe = Pipe()
    task.standardOutput = pipe
    task.standardError = pipe
    task.launch()
    let data = pipe.fileHandleForReading.readDataToEndOfFile()
    let output = String(data: data, encoding: .utf8) ?? ""
    task.waitUntilExit()
    return (output, task.terminationStatus)
}
0

Example of using Process class to run a Python script.

Also:

 - added basic exception handling
 - setting environment variables (in my case I had to do it to get Google SDK to authenticate correctly)
 - arguments 







 import Cocoa

func shellTask(_ url: URL, arguments:[String], environment:[String : String]) throws ->(String?, String?){
   let task = Process()
   task.executableURL = url
   task.arguments =  arguments
   task.environment = environment

   let outputPipe = Pipe()
   let errorPipe = Pipe()

   task.standardOutput = outputPipe
   task.standardError = errorPipe
   try task.run()

   let outputData = outputPipe.fileHandleForReading.readDataToEndOfFile()
   let errorData = errorPipe.fileHandleForReading.readDataToEndOfFile()

   let output = String(decoding: outputData, as: UTF8.self)
   let error = String(decoding: errorData, as: UTF8.self)

   return (output,error)
}

func pythonUploadTask()
{
   let url = URL(fileURLWithPath: "/usr/bin/python")
   let pythonScript =  "upload.py"

   let fileToUpload = "/CuteCat.mp4"
   let arguments = [pythonScript,fileToUpload]
   var environment = ProcessInfo.processInfo.environment
   environment["PATH"]="usr/local/bin"
   environment["GOOGLE_APPLICATION_CREDENTIALS"] = "/Users/j.chudzynski/GoogleCredentials/credentials.json"
   do {
      let result = try shellTask(url, arguments: arguments, environment: environment)
      if let output = result.0
      {
         print(output)
      }
      if let output = result.1
      {
         print(output)
      }

   } catch  {
      print("Unexpected error:\(error)")
   }
}
1
  • where do you place the file "upload.py' Commented Nov 19, 2019 at 22:46
0

I've built SwiftExec, a small library for running such commands:

import SwiftExec

var result: ExecResult
do {
    result = try exec(program: "/usr/bin/git", arguments: ["status"])
} catch {
    let error = error as! ExecError
    result = error.execResult
}

print(result.exitCode!)
print(result.stdout!)
print(result.stderr!)

It's a single-file library which can easily be copy-pasted into projects or installed using SPM. It's tested and simplifies error handling.

There's also ShellOut, which additionally supports a variety of pre-defined commands.

0

I saw many apps running a terminal command like:

cd /Applications/Theirappname.app/Contents/Resources && do sth here

This command is not different from running a shell script and if the app is not in Applications folder, it won't be executed correctly because this error will occur: No such file or directory: /Applications/Theirappname.app. Therefore, if you want to run an executable file in your Resources folder, you should use this code:

func runExec() -> Int32 {
   let task = Process()
   task.arguments = [Bundle.main.url(forResource: "YourExecutablefile", withExtension: "its_extension", subdirectory: "if_exists/")!.path]
   //If it does not have an extension then you just leave it empty
   //You can remove subdirectory if it does not exist
   task.launch()
   task.waitUntilExit()
   return task.terminationStatus
}

If your executable file requires an/some argument(s), the code will look like this:

func runExec() -> Int32 {
        let task = Process()
        task.launchPath = "/bin/bash"
        task.launchPath = Bundle.main.url(forResource: "YourExecutablefile", withExtension: "its_extension", subdirectory: "if_exists")?.path
   //If it does not have an extension then you just leave it empty
   //You can remove subdirectory if it does not exist
        task.arguments = ["arg1","arg2"]
        task.launch()
        task.waitUntilExit()
        return task.terminationStatus
}
0

I'm in the process of re-factoring some existing Objective-C code that used NSTask to Swift, and one key thing missing in other answers is how you should be handling large quantities of stdout/stderr output. Failure to do this seems to result in hangs in the launched process.

One of the commands I commonly launch can produce hundreds of KB of output to both stdout and stderr.

To deal with this, I buffer the output thusly:

    import Foundation
    
    struct ShellScriptExecutor {
    
        static func runScript(_ script: ShellScript) -> ShellScriptResult {
            var errors: String = ""
            let tempFile = copyToTempFile(script)
            let process = Process()
            let stdout = Pipe()
            let stderr = Pipe()
            var stdoutData = Data.init(capacity: 8192)
            var stderrData = Data.init(capacity: 8192)
    
            process.standardOutput = stdout
            process.standardError = stderr
            process.executableURL = URL(fileURLWithPath: "/bin/zsh")
            process.arguments = [tempFile]
    
            do {
                try process.run()
    
                // Buffer the data while running
                while process.isRunning {
                    stdoutData.append(pipeToData(stdout))
                    stderrData.append(pipeToData(stderr))
                }
    
                process.waitUntilExit()
    
                stdoutData.append(pipeToData(stdout))
                errors = dataToString(stderrData) + pipeToString(stderr)
            }
    
            catch {
                print("Process failed for " + tempFile + ": " + error.localizedDescription)
            }
    
            // Clean up
            if !tempFile.isEmpty {
                do {
                    try FileManager.default.removeItem(atPath: tempFile)
                }
    
                catch {
                    print("Unable to remove " + tempFile + ": " + error.localizedDescription)
                }
            }
    
            return ShellScriptResult(stdoutData, script.resultType, errors)
        }
    
        static private func copyToTempFile(_ script: ShellScript) -> String {
            let tempFile: String = URL(fileURLWithPath: NSTemporaryDirectory())
                .appendingPathComponent(ProcessInfo.processInfo.globallyUniqueString + ".sh", isDirectory: false).path
    
            if FileManager.default.createFile(atPath: tempFile, contents: Data(script.script.utf8), attributes: nil) {
                return tempFile;
            }
            else {
                return ""
            }
        }
    
        static private func pipeToString(_ pipe: Pipe) -> String {
            return dataToString(pipeToData(pipe))
        }
    
        static private func dataToString(_ data: Data) -> String {
            return String(decoding: data, as: UTF8.self)
        }
    
        static private func pipeToData(_ pipe: Pipe) -> Data {
            return pipe.fileHandleForReading.readDataToEndOfFile()
        }
    }

ShellScript and ShellScriptResult are just simple wrapper classes, e.g.

import Foundation

struct ShellScript {

    var script: String {
        return _script
    }

    var resultType: String {
        return _resultType
    }

    private var _script: String
    private var _resultType: String

    init(_ script: String, _ resultType: String) {
        _script = script
        _resultType = resultType
    }
}
import Foundation

struct ShellScriptResult {

    var resultType: String {
        return _resultType
    }

    var output: Data {
        return _output
    }

    var errors: String {
        return _errors
    }

    var status: Int32 {
        return _status;
    }

    private var _resultType: String
    private var _output: Data
    private var _errors: String
    private var _status: Int32
    
    init(_ output: Data, _ resultType: String, _ errors: String, _ status: Int32) {
        _output = output
        _resultType = resultType
        _errors = errors
        _status = status
    }
}
2
  • The best answer so far...but...where are the "simple wrapper classes"? Specifically for ShellScript which has "resultType" property but no indication what it is supposed to be. Enumeration of some sort? Commented Jul 19, 2023 at 12:25
  • @user1318024, as requested. Commented Jul 21, 2023 at 17:26
0
func swiftSyncFileExec() -> String {
    let process = Process()
    process.executableURL = URL(fileURLWithPath: "/usr/bin/swift")
    process.arguments = ["/yourpath/path/swift.swift"]
    let pipe = Pipe()
    process.standardOutput = pipe
    process.standardError = pipe
    try! process.run()
    let data = try! pipe.fileHandleForReading.readToEnd()
    let outputString = String(data: data!, encoding: .utf8)!
    return outputString
}

Usage:

runSwiftShellWithArgs()

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