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I've got div with date 2014-11-17 16:00 that I want to parse. This is how I do:

var beginDate = new Date((document.getElementById('beginDate').innerHTML))
            .getTime();

Chrome shows millis, but not Safari and Firefox:

NaN

What's wrong?

Second effort:

var beginDateStr = document.getElementById('beginDate').innerHTML;
beginDateStr = beginDateStr.split(' ').join('T');   
var beginDate = new Date(beginDateStr);

I've got an Invalid Date

Third effort:

var beginDateStr = document.getElementById('beginDate').innerHTML;
beginDateStr = beginDateStr.split(' ').join('T');
beginDateStr = beginDateStr.replace(/\s/g, "");
console.log(beginDateStr);
var beginDate = new Date(beginDateStr);
var currentDate = new Date().getTime();
console.log(beginDate);

In Chrome it's

2014-11-17T16:00
Mon Nov 17 2014 19:00:00 GMT+0300 (RTZ 2 (зима)) 

Wrong time.

In Firefox it's

2014-11-17T16:00
2014-11-17T13:00:00.000Z

Not even equal.

  • 1
    There is a difference between the browsers in how lenient they are in interpreting deviations in standard date formats. Chrome is more forgiving (or you could call it less compliant), FF less so. – user663031 Nov 17 '14 at 12:57
  • How to fix that? – Tony Nov 17 '14 at 13:01
  • Try putting a "T" between the date and the time instead of a space. – user663031 Nov 17 '14 at 13:04
  • The T will work. It does for me. You may have extra spaces or other junk in your input. Can you do a console log on beginDateStr? Also, try a simple test of new Date("2014-11-17T16:00") in your console. – user663031 Nov 17 '14 at 13:33
  • If I set a string you wrote, yes, everything is fine. If I set a string from div, no, 'Invalid Date' is result. – Tony Nov 17 '14 at 13:48
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new Date(dateString) (and its equivalent, Date.parse(), is not intended to be a general-purpose heuristic date parser. Fundementally, it parses dates only in standard forms. From the MDN page:

It accepts the RFC2822 / IETF date syntax (RFC2822 Section 3.3), e.g. "Mon, 25 Dec 1995 13:30:00 GMT".

and in ES5

The date time string may be in ISO 8601 format. For example, "2011-10-10" (just date) or "2011-10-10T14:48:00" (date and time)

Beyond that, browsers can do whatever they please:

The ECMAScript specification states: If the String does not conform to the standard format the function may fall back to any implementation–specific heuristics or implementation–specific parsing algorithm.

There is a difference between the browsers in how lenient they are in interpreting deviations in standard date formats. Chrome is more forgiving (or you could call it less compliant), FF less so.

In your case, 2014-11-17T16:00 would parse correctly in all conforming browsers.

However, as you have found, different browsers may make different assumptions about the time zone. Although the MDN page says

Given a date string of "March 7, 2014", parse() assumes a local time zone, but given an ISO format such as "2014-03-07" it will assume a time zone of UTC.

it appears that without an offset specified (such as +0530), FF appears to assume the local timezone, whereas Chrome assumes UTC:

FF:

new Date("2014-11-17T18:30")
Date 2014-11-17T13:00:00.000Z
toLocaleString: "11/17/2014, 6:30:00 PM"

Chrome:

new Date("2014-11-17T18:30")
Tue Nov 18 2014 00:00:00 GMT+0530 (India Standard Time)
toLocaleString: "11/18/2014, 12:00:00 AM"

The only way to be sure is to explicitly specify the offset.

  • 'Invalid Date'. Look at the topic again, pls – Tony Nov 17 '14 at 13:29
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You can look to http://momentjs.com/ It can be run different browsers.

  • 1
    great, thanks... – fatihk Oct 29 '15 at 9:01
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If you know the date parts order is fixed, use the unambiguous serial constructor:

var parts = "2014-11-17 16:00".split(/[-\s:]/);
var dt = new Date(parts[0], +parts[1] - 1, parts[2], parts[3], parts[4], 0, 0);
  • Thu Nov 30 1899 00:00:00 GMT+0300 – Tony Nov 17 '14 at 13:13
  • That does not match the input format specified in the question. – Alex K. Nov 17 '14 at 13:17
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I would recommend the jquery datepicker parseDate function. (If you are using jQuery UI)

But unfortunately i dont know if it can handle hours and minutes.

var beginDate = jQuery.datepicker.parseDate("yy-mm-dd", document.getElementById('beginDate').innerHTML).getTime();

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Try fourth effort with this script :

str  = (document.getElementById("beginDate").innerHTML).split(/\-|\s/);
dateString = new Date(str.slice(0,3).join('/')+' '+str[3]);
datetime = dateString.getTime();
document.write(datetime);

also note that there should not be extra spaces in the input.

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