I am writing some code that uses IP/UDP packets to communicate. I thus need to be able to calculate the checksum for both headers. My header structures are as follows:

/* Internet protocol v4 header */
typedef struct {
    uint8_t ip_ver_hl;      /* ip v4, header length = 5 32 bit words */
    uint8_t ip_tos;         /* type of service */
    uint16_t ip_len;        /* total length in bytes (ip header + data) */
    uint16_t ip_id;         /* identification */
    uint16_t ip_off;        /* fragment offset field */
#define IP_DF 0x4000        /* dont fragment flag */
#define IP_MF 0x2000        /* more fragments flag */
#define IP_OFFMASK 0x1fff   /* mask for fragmenting bits */
    uint8_t  ip_ttl;        /* time to live */
uint8_t  ip_proto;      /* layer 4 protocol */
uint16_t ip_checksum;   /* ip header checksum */
uint32_t ip_src;        /* ip source address */
uint32_t ip_dst;        /* ip destination addresss */
} ttev_ip_header_t;

/* Pseudo header used to calculate udp checksum */
typedef struct {
    uint32_t ip_src;        /* ip source address */
    uint32_t ip_dst;        /* ip destination addresss */
    uint8_t zero;           /* placeholder = 0 */
    uint8_t ip_proto;       /* layer 4 protocol = udp */
    uint16_t udp_len;       /* total length in bytes (header + data) */
} ttev_udp_pseudo_t;   

/* User datagram protocol header */
typedef struct {
    uint16_t udp_src_port;  /* source port */
    uint16_t udp_dst_port;  /* destination port */
    uint16_t udp_len;       /* total length in bytes (udp header + data) */
    uint16_t udp_checksum;  /* udp header/data checksum */
} ttev_udp_header_t;

Now my actual general checksum functions works great. However, since the structures are not packed, aren't I open to errors since when checksumming over on of the headers, there may be padding between the structure members? I'd like to avoid attribute((packed)) to maintain portability.

Is there an alternative besides checksumming each individual 16 bit group in a structure?

The UDP and IP packet headers are structured so that they match C's alignment. Thus, as long as uint8_t and uint16_t are actually 8-bits and 16-bits wide (respectively) then there will never be any added padding and word-wise checksum over the entire structure will be just fine.

Basically, alignment means that every field starts on a boundary matching its size or the natural word size of the machine (whichever is smaller). The structure itself is padded out to be a multiple of the largest alignment among all fields.

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